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Games: Steam Client for Linux, Tank Maniacs, Gladiabots, Total War: THREE KINGDOMS

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  • The latest Steam Client Beta fixes Rumble support on Linux with Steam Input

    Seems Valve are on a bit of a roll lately fixing up some long-standing issues in the Steam Client for Linux.

    They've been released quite a number of Beta client updates recently with Linux improvements, like the one last week which had a fix for a this two year old issue where you were unable to move games around if they had files bigger than 2GB.

    The latest Beta, released today fixes another long-standing issue with gamepad Rumble support. Valve said they "Added support for rumble pass-through for virtual controllers. This fixes missing rumble support for any controllers opted into Steam Input, and rumble emulation support for the Steam controller.".

  • We have some keys for 'Tank Maniacs' for those willing to test and give feedback

    Tank Maniacs, a crazy local multiplayer game that's all about blowing each other up is coming to Linux "soon" and we have keys for those willing to provide the developer with feedback.

    For those who haven't seen it before, check out the trailer below first to see if you would actually be interested:

  • Create your AI, pick your robots and prepare for battle as Gladiabots has left Early Access

    Gladiabots makes me feel dumb, very dumb. It asks you to create various AI and assign them to robots, to face off against another team of robots in a battle arena.

    It's a strategy game of sorts, while also being a logic puzzle programming game at its heart as well. It offers up a single-player campaign, which realistically is just a (quite good) extended tutorial to get you ready to compete against other real people. This is where it really gets interesting, as it offers online play but it's of the asynchronous sort so you're not playing at the same time, meaning it doesn't actually need people online to play which makes it pretty sweet.

  • Total War: THREE KINGDOMS is out and it comes with same-day Linux support

    Total War: THREE KINGDOMS, possibly one of the biggest Total War games yet is officially out. Developed by Creative Assembly and published by SEGA, it was ported by Feral Interactive and they managed to get Linux support in right away.

Total War: Three Kingdoms Sees Same-Day Linux Release

  • Total War: Three Kingdoms Sees Same-Day Linux Release

    Feral Interactive has managed to deliver a same-day release of their Linux and macOS ports to coincide with today's Windows release of Total War: Three Kingdoms.

    This turn-based real-time tactics video game was developed by Creative Assembly and published by Sega. Today marks the Windows release of this latest Total War game and surprisingly Feral has managed a same-day Linux/macOS release.

Total War: THREE KINGDOMS Is Out on Linux

Original and Softpedia (Total War)

  • A new era of conquest — Total War: THREE KINGDOMS out now for macOS and Linux

    The year is AD 190. China, a great but fractured country, calls out for new leadership. Now is the time to unite it under your rule, forge the next great dynasty, and build a legacy that will last through the ages.

  • Total War: Three Kingdoms Out Now for Linux and Mac, Ported by Feral Interactive

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today that the Total War: Three Kingdoms turn-based strategy real-time tactics video game is now available for Linux and macOS platforms.

    Developed by Creative Assembly and published by SEGA, the Total War: Three Kingdoms video game was actually launched today, May 23rd, 2019, for Microsoft Windows, but Feral Interactive made it possible to sync their Linux and Mac ports with the Window release, so you can play it on your favorite platform.

    As its name suggests, the game is set in the Three Kingdoms period, where players will have to control one of the twelve legendary Warlords in their attempt to eliminate other factions and unify China. The goal of the Total War: Three Kingdoms video game is to become the ultimate ruler of the kingdom.

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