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Mozilla: BigInt, WebRender, Mozilla Localization, Firefox 67 Release and More

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Moz/FF
  • Andy Wingo: bigint shipping in firefox!

    I am delighted to share with folks the results of a project I have been helping out on for the last few months: implementation of "BigInt" in Firefox, which is finally shipping in Firefox 68 (beta).

  • Mozilla GFX: WebRender newsletter #45

    Hi there! I first published this newsletter episode on May 21st and hitting the publish button at the same time as Jessie who wrote an excellent announcement post about WebRender on the stable channel. We decided to unpublish the newsletter for a couple of days to avoid shadowing the other post.

    WebRender is a GPU based 2D rendering engine for web written in Rust, currently powering Mozilla’s research web browser servo and on its way to becoming Firefox‘s rendering engine.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n report: May edition

    Firefox 68 has officially entered Beta. The deadline to ship localization updates into this version is June 25. It’s important to remember that 68 is going to be an ESR version too: if your localization is incomplete on Jun 26, or contains errors, it won’t be possible to fix them later on for ESR.

    A lot of content has landed in Firefox 68 towards the end of the cycle. In particular, make sure to test the new stub installer in the coming weeks, and the redesigned about:welcome experience. Detailed instructions are available in this thread on dev-l10n. You should also check out this post on how to localize the new “Join Firefox” message.

    Partially related to Firefox Desktop: Facebook Container is quickly approaching version 2.0, adding several informative panels to the initial bare UI.

  • Firefox 67 Released With Improved Performance

    Mozilla team has released Firefox 67 (May 21, 2019) today. In this article, we will show you what’s new in Firefox 67.

    Mozilla Firefox (known as Firefox) is a free and open-source web browser developed by the Mozilla Foundation.

    Firefox is available for Windows, OS X, Linux and mobile for Android.

  • Emblematic Group and Mozilla Team Up to Showcase Next Generation of Storytelling on the Web

    Everything you share on the internet is a story. You read blog posts and watch videos that make you feel connected to people across the world. Virtual Reality has made these experiences even stronger, but it wasn’t available to most people as a storytelling tool, until now.

    This breakthrough in accessibility comes from VR pioneer and award winning journalist, Nonny de la Peña, who is founder & CEO of the immersive technology company Emblematic Group. Their newest initiative was to launch a browser based platform that allows anyone to tap into the immersive power of virtual reality, regardless of their technical background. That is exactly what they did with REACH. With support from like minded partners such as Mozilla and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, de la Peña launched the platform at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. REACH completely simplifies authorship and distribution of virtual reality experiences using a simple drag and drop interface which anyone can access from any device, including a laptop, tablet, or smartphone.

More on BigInt

  • Firefox 68 Integrates BigInt Support

    In addition to Firefox 68's WebRender slated to deliver much better performance, another headlining feature of this next Mozilla Firefox web-browser update is BigInt support.

    BigInts are a new JavaScript primitive for integers that are suffixed with an n and can handle values up to 253 in value. BigInt supports interoperability with systems using 64-bit numbers and has been supported similarly by Google's Chrome web browser since last year.

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Mozilla: The Rust Programming Language and Firefox Releases

  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Upcoming docs.rs changes

    On September 30th breaking changes will be deployed to the docs.rs build environment. docs.rs is a free service building and hosting documentation for all the crates published on crates.io. It's open source, maintained by the Rustdoc team and operated by the Infrastructure team.

  • Flatulence, Crystals, and Happy Little Accidents

    The recording of my Rust Conf talk on algorithmic art and pen plotters is up on YouTube! [...] I really enjoyed giving this talk, and I think it went well. I want more creative coding, joy, surprise, and silliness in the Rust community. This talk is a small attempt at contributing to that, and I hope folks left inspired.

  • You'll get a new Firefox each month in 2020 as Mozilla speeds up releases

    Mozilla will turn the Firefox crank faster in 2020, releasing a new version of its web browser every four weeks instead of every six. If you're using the browser, the change should deliver new features to you faster since there will be less waiting between when developers build them and when they arrive. "In recent quarters, we've had many requests to take features to market sooner. Feature teams are increasingly working in sprints that align better with shorter release cycles. Considering these factors, it is time we changed our release cadence," Firefox team members Ritu Kothari and Yan Or said in a blog post Tuesday. "Shorter release cycles provide greater flexibility to support product planning and priority changes due to business or market requirements."

GNU lightning 2.1.3 released!

GNU lightning is a library to aid in making portable programs 
that compile assembly code at run time. 
Development: 
http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/lightning.git 
Download release: 
ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/lightning/lightning-2.1.3.tar.gz 
  2.1.3 main features are the new RISC-V port, currently supporting 
only Linux 64 bit, and a major rewrite of the register live and 
unknown state logic, so that a long standing issue with a live 
register not accessed for several consecutive blocks could be 
incorrectly assumed dead. 
The matrix of built and tested environments is: 
aarch64	 Linux (Linaro, Foundation_v8pkg) 
alpha	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7l	 Linux (QEMU) 
armv7hl	 Linux (QEMU) 
hppa	 Linux (32 bit, QEMU) 
i686	 Linux and Cygwin 
ia64	 Linux 
mips	 Linux (32 bit) 
powerpc32	Linux 
powerpc64	Linux and AIX 
powerpc64le	Linux 
riscv	 Linux (64 bit, QEMU) 
s390	 Linux (Hercules) 
s390x	 Linux (Hercules) 
sparc	 Linux (QEMU) 
sparc64	 Linux (QEMU) 
x32	 Linux (QEMU) 
x86_64	 Linux and Cygwin 

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Programming: Python and C++

  • Python alternative to Docker

    Deploying a Python app to a server is surprisingly hard. Without blinking, you’ll be dealing with virtual environments and a host of other complications. The landscape of deployment methods is huge. What if I told you that there is a way to build your app into a single file and it isn’t a Docker container? In this article, we’re going to look at common ways of deploying Python apps. We’ll explore the touted benefits of Docker containers to understand why containers are so popular for web apps. Finally, we’ll look at an alternative to Docker that may be a lot simpler for your Python web app and compare and contrast this alternative against Docker.

  • How to Convert a Python String to int

    Integers are whole numbers. In other words, they have no fractional component. Two data types you can use to store an integer in Python are int and str. These types offer flexibility for working with integers in different circumstances. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how you can convert a Python string to an int. You’ll also learn how to convert an int to a string.

  • Free Coaching For PyGotham Speakers

    I help organize PyGotham, NYC’s annual conference about the Python programming language. For the third year in a row, we’re giving our speakers free sessions with a professional speaking coach, opera singer Melissa Collom. In the past we’ve limited coaching to first-time speakers, but we’re now able to coach everyone.

  • 8 Excellent C++ Natural Language Processing Tools

    Natural language processing (NLP) is a set of techniques for using computers to detect in human language the kinds of things that humans detect automatically. Natural language processing (NLP) is an exciting field of computer science, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics concerned with the interactions between computers and human (natural) languages. It includes word and sentence tokenization, text classification and sentiment analysis, spelling correction, information extraction, parsing, meaning extraction, and question answering.

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