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Fedora 28 End of Life

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Red Hat

With the recent release of Fedora 30, Fedora 28 officially enters End Of Life (EOL) status effective May 28, 2019. This impacts any systems still on Fedora 28. If you’re not sure what that means to you, read more below.

At this point, packages in the Fedora 28 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, the community adds no new packages to the Fedora 28 collection starting at End of Life. Essentially, the Fedora 28 release will not change again, meaning users no longer receive the normal benefits of this leading-edge operating system.

There’s an easy, free way to keep those benefits. If you’re still running an End of Life version such as Fedora 28, now is the perfect time to upgrade to Fedora 29 or to Fedora 30. Upgrading gives you access to all the community-provided software in Fedora.

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Fedora 28 Linux OS Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Upgrade

  • Fedora 28 Linux OS Reached End of Life, Users Urged to Upgrade to Fedora 30

    Released more than a year ago, on May 1st, 2018, the Fedora 28 operating system shipped with the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment, a new Modular repository, automatic updates for Fedora Atomic Host, and other cool features. But, as good things must come to an end, Fedora 28 has now reached end of life and it will no longer be supported with software and security updates.

    "At this point, packages in the Fedora 28 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, the community adds no new packages to the Fedora 28 collection starting at End of Life," said Paul W. Frields in an announcement. "Essentially, the Fedora 28 release will not change again, meaning users no longer receive the normal benefits of this leading-edge operating system."

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