Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GNOME and Fedora/Red Hat: Translation, Rust, Sysprof and EPEL

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Why translation platforms matter

    In my opinion, the GNOME platform offers the best translation platform for the following reasons:

    Its site contains both the team organization and the translation platform. It's easy to see who is responsible and their roles on the team. Everything is concentrated on a few screens.
    It's easy to find what to work on, and you quickly realize you'll have to download files to your computer and send them back once you modify them. It's not very sexy, but the logic is easy to understand.
    Once you send a file back, the platform can send an alert to the mailing list so the team knows the next steps and the translation can be easily discussed at the global level (rather than commenting on specific sentences).
    It has 297 languages.
    It shows clear percentages on progress, both on basic sentences and advanced menus and documentation.
    Coupled with a predictable GNOME release schedule, everything is available for the community to work well because the tool promotes community work.

    If we look at the Debian translation team, which has been doing a good job for years translating an unimaginable amount of content for Fedora (especially news), we see there is a highly codified translation process based exclusively on emails with a manual push in the repositories. This team also puts everything into the process, rather than the tools, and—despite the considerable energy this seems to require—it has worked for many years while being among the leading group of languages.

    My perception is that the primary issue for a successful translation platform is not based on the ability to make the unitary (technical, translation) work, but on how it structures and supports the translation team's processes. This is what gives sustainability.

    The production processes are the most important way to structure a team; by putting them together correctly, it's easy for newcomers to understand how processes work, adopt them, and explain them to the next group of newcomers.

    To build a sustainable community, the first consideration must be on a tool that supports collaborative work, then on its usability.

    This explains my frustration with the Zanata tool, which is efficient from a technical and interface standpoint, but poor when it comes to helping to structure a community. GIven that translation is a community-driven process (possibly one of the most community-driven processes in open source software development), this is a critical problem for me.

  • Federico Mena-Quintero: Bzip2 in Rust - Basic infrastructure and CRC32 computation

    I have started a little experiment in porting bits of the widely-used bzip2/bzlib to Rust. I hope this can serve to refresh bzip2, which had its last release in 2010 and has been nominally unmaintained for years.

    I hope to make several posts detailing how this port is done. In this post, I'll talk about setting up a Rust infrastructure for bzip2 and my experiments in replacing the C code that does CRC32 computations.

  • Sysprof Developments

    Earlier this month, Matthias and I teamed up to push through some of our profiling tooling for GTK and GNOME. We took the occasional work I had done on Sysprof over the past few years and integrated that into the GTK-4.x tree.

    Sysprof uses a binary log file to store information about execution in a matter that is easy to write-buffer and read-back using positioned reads. It helps keep the sampling overhead of sysprof low. But it’s too detail oriented for each application supporting the format to write. To make this stuff reusable I created a libsysprof-capture-3.a static library we embed from various layers of the platform.

    GTK-4.x is now using this. Builder itself uses it to log internal statistics, tracing data, and counters for troubleshooting. I’ve also put forward patches for GJS to integrate with it. Georges revamped and pushed forward a prototype by Jonas to integrate with Mutter/Shell and get us frame timings and Cogl pipeline data. With some work we can finish off the i915 data sources that Eric Anholt did to correlate GPU commands too.

    What this means for developers is that soon we’ll be able to capture system information from various layers in the stack and correlate them using similar clocks. We’re only scratching the surface right now, but it’s definitely promising. It’s already useful to quantify the true performance improvements of merge-requests in Mutter and Shell.

  • Sysprof Making Progress For Improved GNOME Profiling

    Christian Hergert of GNOME Builder IDE fame has been working on a round of improvements recently to the Sysprof tool he also leads development on for system profiling in determining the hot functions of a program and related profiling mostly around GNOME components.

    One of the main additions has been adding support to GTK4 for Sysprof's new engine and he is planning on plumbing that new engine support through to at least Mutter and GJS while potentially back-porting it to the likes of GTK3.

  • EPEL Proposal: EPEL Wagontrain (aka Steve Gallagher's EPEL 8 Branch Strategy)

More in Tux Machines

Apache: Self Assessment and Security

  • The Apache® Software Foundation Announces Annual Report for 2019 Fiscal Year

    The Apache® Software Foundation (ASF), the all-volunteer developers, stewards, and incubators of more than 350 Open Source projects and initiatives, announced today the availability of the annual report for its 2019 fiscal year, which ended 30 April 2019.

  • Open Source at the ASF: A Year in Numbers

    332 active projects, 71 million lines of code changed, 7,000+ committers… The Apache Software Foundation has published its annual report for fiscal 2019. The hub of a sprawling, influential open source community, the ASF remains in rude good health, despite challenges this year including the need for “an outsized amount of effort” dealing with trademark infringements, and “some in the tech industry trying to exploit the goodwill earned by the larger Open Source community.” [...] The ASF names 10 “platinum” sponsors: AWS, Cloudera, Comcast, Facebook, Google, LeaseWeb, Microsoft, the Pineapple Fund, Tencent Cloud, and Verizon Media

  • Apache Software Foundation Is Worth $20 Billion

    Yes, Apache is worth $20 billion by its own valuation of the software it offers for free. But what price can you realistically put on open source code? If you only know the name Apache in connection with the web server then you are missing out on some interesting software. The Apache Software Foundation ASF, grew out of the Apache HTTP Server project in 1999 with the aim of furthering open source software. It provides a licence, the Apache licence, a decentralized governance and requires projects to be licensed to the ASF so that it can protect the intellectual property rights.

  • Apache Security Advisories Red Flag Wrong Versions in Patching Gaffe

    Researchers have pinpointed errors in two dozen Apache Struts security advisories, which warn users of vulnerabilities in the popular open-source web app development framework. They say that the security advisories listed incorrect versions impacted by the vulnerabilities. The concern from this research is that security administrators in companies using the actual impacted versions would incorrectly think that their versions weren’t affected – and would thus refrain from applying patches, said researchers with Synopsys who made the discovery, Thursday. “The real question here from this research is whether there remain unpatched versions of the newly disclosed versions in production scenarios,” Tim Mackey, principal security strategist for the Cybersecurity Research Center at Synopsys, told Threatpost. “In all cases, the Struts community had already issued patches for the vulnerabilities so the patches exist, it’s just a question of applying them.”

Google and Android Code

  • Google releases source code for I/O 2019 app with Android Q gesture nav, dark theme

    The Google I/O companion app for Android often takes advantage of the latest design stylings and OS features. It demoed Android Q’s gesture navigation and dark theme this year, with the company today releasing the I/O 2019 source code.

  • Introducing Coil, an open-source Android image loading library backed by Kotlin Coroutines

    Yesterday, Colin White, a Senior Android Engineer at Instacart, introduced Coroutine Image Loader (Coil). It is a fast, lightweight, and modern image loading library for Android backed by Kotlin.

  • Google open-sources Live Transcribe’s speech engine

    Google today open-sourced the speech engine that powers its Android speech recognition transcription tool Live Transcribe. The company hopes doing so will let any developer deliver captions for long-form conversations. The source code is available now on GitHub. Google released Live Transcribe in February. The tool uses machine learning algorithms to turn audio into real-time captions. Unlike Android’s upcoming Live Caption feature, Live Transcribe is a full-screen experience, uses your smartphone’s microphone (or an external microphone), and relies on the Google Cloud Speech API. Live Transcribe can caption real-time spoken words in over 70 languages and dialects. You can also type back into it — Live Transcribe is really a communication tool. The other main difference: Live Transcribe is available on 1.8 billion Android devices. (When Live Caption arrives later this year, it will only work on select Android Q devices.)

FOSS in Crypto: Bots, Audius, and "Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs"

  • Best Free and Open-Source Crypto Trading Bots, Rated and Reviewed

    Crypto trading bots have become an increasingly popular tool for experienced bitcoin traders who want to deploy automated bitcoin trading strategies. As a result, there are now over a dozen trading bots (with ranging subscription prices) that digital currency traders can use. Fortunately, for traders who want to test out algorithmic trading before committing funds toward a specific bot, there are several free trading bots from which to choose. Here’s an introduction to the most popular free, open-source bitcoin trading bots available in 2019.

  • Blockchain Music Streaming Startup Unveils Source Code, Incentives

    Audius, a blockchain startup that aims to disrupt the music streaming industry, has uploaded its public beta version.

  • Blockchain music-streaming service Audius gears up for public beta

    A new streaming service with its sights set on making the middlemen of the music biz obsolete is inching closer toward its goal of disrupting the Spotifys and SoundClouds of the world. After a year of development, and armed with $5 million in investment capital from VC firms General Catalyst, Lightspeed, and Pantera Capital, blockchain startup Audius is finally ready to show the world what it's been working on.

  • Crypto Code Commits Remain Near All-Time Highs, Despite Price Declines

    The least committed contributors were the first to leave as cryptocurrency market caps went south. That’s the main finding from Electric Capital’s second “Developer Report,” which was published Monday. The report analyzes code activity in all the open-source repositories in crypto and follows the venture capital firm’s first such report from March. While there’s a sense that protocols and projects have been losing code contributors, the majority of developers that left crypto during the market correction in the first half of 2019 (77 percent of them) were the least committed contributors to the least promising projects.

Sharing/Collaboration/Open Data/Open Access

  • 3D printing organs may soon be a reality via a new open-source technique – Future Blink

    Bioengineers at Rice University created entangled cardiovascular networks similar to the body's natural passageways.

  • Global reinsurance experts urge investment in open-source risk models

    Strategic management experts say greater collaboration between the insurance industry and state policy makers, including investment in open-source risk models, could improve society's ability to recover from disasters linked to climate change.

  • Flume Kicks Off Open Source FlumeSounds Project

    Australian #1 bad boy of EDM Flume made a surprise project announcement FlumeSounds yesterday. He uploaded a near 8-minute video of samples to all his socials for fans and creators to manipulate.

  • Flume announces open-source sample series for producers

    Hot off the release of his new EP, 'Quits', Australian producer Flume has revealed Flume Sounds, an open-source audio loop series for producers.

  • First global open-source database for spinal cord injury research will be a ‘game-changer,’ say experts

    Experts from the University of Alberta and two universities of California are teaming up to launch the world’s first open-source database for spinal cord injury research. The Open Data Commons for preclinical Spinal Cord Injury research (ODC-SCI) will improve research and treatment worldwide by making data more accessible, according to researchers and patients. “The database has the potential to improve treatment for up to half a million people suffering from spinal cord injuries worldwide, and also enhance research in other areas of health, science and rehabilitation,” said Randy Goebel, associate vice-president of research at the U of A.

  • Nationwide project provides free science materials to meet California’s new standards

    While California students began taking a new statewide science test this past spring, school districts were still struggling to get teaching materials aligned to the state’s new science standards into classrooms. A new nationwide effort is trying to speed up that process by offering free, open source science materials to teachers and schools. In 2017, philanthropists, state leaders and curriculum writers formed OpenSciEd to get materials to teachers implementing the Next Generation Science Standards, new academic standards that emphasize hands-on projects and integrate several scientific disciplines. California adopted the new standards in 2013 and this past spring began administering a new state science test. But it wasn’t until last November that the State Board of Education approved a list of recommended textbooks and materials aligned to the new standards for kindergarten through 8th grade.