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KDE and GNOME: Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo, KDE GSoC Projects, Kate & C++ Developer Survey and Sumaid Syed's GSoC Work on GNOME

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KDE
GNOME
  • Nextcloud Login Plugin for PlaMo

    With the completion of my first milestone for my GSoC project: Nextcloud Integration on Plasma Mobile, plasma mobile accounts settings now enables the users to add their nextcloud accounts via webview.

    Well! didn’t accounts setting already provide the method to add nextcloud/owncloud accounts? Yes, this functionality was already implemented by the owncloud plugin in kaccounts-providers project. Then, why did I re-implement the same thing?

    As I mentioned, now accounts can be added via webview.

  • First week of GSOC, Piece Table Implement

    Hi! Last week was start of the GSOC coding period. So I started my project. Also I opened my code on the KDE git. https://cgit.kde.org/scratch/songeon/kmarkdownparser.git/

    If you are interested in my project feel free to look and give me some advices.

  • KIOFuse: 32-bit Support

    The first two weeks of the GSoC coding period are now over.

    Firstly, a mapping between KIO errors and FUSE errors has now been established. Previously all KIO Job errors were simply sent back to FUSE as EIO, which isn’t entirely accurate. The mapping now provides more accurate error replies.

    A major new addition is 32-bit support. KIOFuse did not compile on 32-bit but these compilation errors have now been alleviated. They mostly stemmed from the fact that size_t has a different size on different architectures, and that file sizes should always be represented as off_t anyway.

  • Kate & C++ Developer Survey

    While browsing the ISO C++ homepage I stumbled over the results PDF of the Second Annual C++ Foundation Developer Survey “Lite”.

    I was astonished that Kate made it into the “Which development environments (IDEs) or editors do you use for C++ development?” results.

    ;=) Seems not only I use it as my normal editor for working on C++ code.

  • Sumaid Syed: First Two Weeks

    Jean Felder ( My mentor for GSoC project) and Marinus Schraal (GNOME Music Maintainer) suggested that I propose a plan of the whole project. Now trust me! This is the much more difficult than actual coding!
    I usually work on my personal projects and start working from scratch, but here the project involves so many different libraries, so I really struggled with making a plan with a proper timeline.

  • What is my Project?

    In this case, all we need to do is extract those mbids and store them in tracker. Tracker is a file indexing and search framework, which GNOME Music relies on. Hence it’s necessary to extract and index mbids in tracker from file.

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