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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • A [Windows] virus has thrown Philadelphia’s court system into chaos

     

    Since May 21st, a virus has shut down Philadelphia’s online court system, bringing network access to a standstill. The problems started unexpectedly: suddenly, no one could seem to access the system to file documents. “It wasn’t working,” says Rachel Gallegos, a senior staff attorney with the civil legal aid organization Community Legal Services. “I thought it was my computer.”

  • Linux Command-Line Editors Vulnerable to High-Severity Bug

     

    Vim and Neovim have both released patches for the bug (CVE-2019-12735) that the National Institute of Standards and Technology warns, “allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary OS commands via the :source! command in a modeline.”
     

    “Beyond patching, it’s recommended to disable modelines in the vimrc (set nomodeline), to use the securemodelinesplugin, or to disable modelineexpr (since patch 8.1.1366, Vim-only) to disallow expressions in modelines,” the researcher said.

  • Beware Linux users! Vulnerability in Vim or Neovim Editor could compromise your Linux
  • The bits and bytes of PKI

    In two previous articles—An introduction to cryptography and public key infrastructure and How do private keys work in PKI and cryptography?—I discussed cryptography and public key infrastructure (PKI) in a general way. I talked about how digital bundles called certificates store public keys and identifying information. These bundles contain a lot of complexity, and it's useful to have a basic understanding of the format for when you need to look under the hood.

  • Update Uncertainty | TechSNAP 405

    We explore the risky world of exposed RDP, from the brute force GoldBrute botnet to the dangerously worm-able BlueKeep vulnerability.

    Plus the importance of automatic updates, and Jim’s new backup box.

  • Microsoft's June 2019 Patch Tuesday fixes many of SandboxEscaper's zero-days

    Microsoft has published today its monthly roll-up of security updates, known as Patch Tuesday. This month, the OS maker has patched 88 vulnerabilities, among which 21 received a rating of "Critical," the company's highest severity ranking.

    Furthermore, the May 2019 Patch Tuesday also included fixes for four of the five zero-days that a security researcher and exploit seller by the name of SandboxEscaper published online over the course of the last month.

  • Researchers use Rowhammer bit flips to steal 2048-bit crypto key [Ed: Mass slanderer and FUDmeister from Ars Technica (he got sued for his style) recalls Rowhammer (which is more theoretical a risk then a real one)]
  • RAMBleed Attack Can Steal Sensitive Data From Computer Memory[Ed: Rowhammer was mentioned by another site of FUDmeisters (one of whom CBS hired for clickbait)]

More in Tux Machines

Networking SBCs run Linux on quad -A53 and -A72 NXP LS chips

Forlinx’s sandwich-style OK1043A-C and OK1046A SBCs run Linux on NXP’s quad -A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively, and offer a 10GbE port and up to 6x GbE ports with optional SFP. Forlinx has posted product pages for two similar COM Express modules and carrier boards that run Linux on NXP’s networking focused LS series processors. The FET1043A-C module taps the up to 1.6GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A while the FET1046A-C uses the up to 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 LS1046A. All the processors are headless — without GPUs. Read more

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).

Android Leftovers

Xfce4-Panel Adds Dark Mode Preference

Landing this week in xfce4-panel was this commit providing a dark mode preference for Xfce4, similar to the growing trend with other desktops/UIs for those wanting a "dark mode" interface. Enabling this option will request the GTK dark theme variant of capable themes. For a long time now GTK has exposed a property (gtk-application-prefer-dark-theme) for preferring dark themes while now is being tapped by xfce4-panel. Read more