Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Programming: Rust, Python, sphinxcontrib-spelling and More

Filed under
Development
  • How to generate a usable map file for Rust code - and related (f)rustrations

    Cargo does not produce a .map file, and if it does, mangling makes it very unusable. If you're searching for the TLDR, read from "How to generate a map file" on the bottom of the article.

  • Converting a Python data into a ReStructured Text table

    This probably exist but I couldn’t find it. I wanted to export a bunch of data from a Python/Django application into something a non-coder could understand. The data was not going to be a plain CSV, but a document, with various tables and explanations of what each table is. Because ReStructured Text seems to be the winning format in the Python world I decided to go with that.

  • Python Anywhere: Using MongoDB on PythonAnywhere with MongoDB Atlas

    Lots of people want to use MongoDB with PythonAnywhere; we don't have support for it built in to the system, but it's actually pretty easy to use with a database provided by MongoDB Atlas -- and as Atlas is a cloud service provided by Mongo's creators, it's probably a good option anyway Smile

    If you're experienced with MongoDB and Atlas, then our help page has all of the details you need for connecting to them from our systems.

    But if you'd just like to dip your toe in the water and find out what all of this MongoDB stuff is about, this blog post explains step-by-step how to get started so that you can try it out.

  • Toward a “Kernel Python”

    Prompted by Amber Brown’s presentation at the Python Language Summit last month, Christian Heimes has followed up on his own earlier work on slimming down the Python standard library, and created a proper Python Enhancement Proposal PEP 594 for removing obviously obsolete and unmaintained detritus from the standard library.

    PEP 594 is great news for Python, and in particular for the maintainers of its standard library, who can now address a reduced surface area. A brief trip through the PEP’s rogues gallery of modules to deprecate or remove1 is illuminating. The python standard library contains plenty of useful modules, but it also hides a veritable necropolis of code, a towering monument to obsolescence, threatening to topple over on its maintainers at any point.

    However, I believe the PEP may be approaching the problem from the wrong direction. Currently, the standard library is maintained in tandem with, and by the maintainers of, the CPython python runtime. Large portions of it are simply included in the hope that it might be useful to somebody. In the aforementioned PEP, you can see this logic at work in defense of the colorsys module: why not remove it? “The module is useful to convert CSS colors between coordinate systems. [It] does not impose maintenance overhead on core development.”

  • EuroPython: EuroPython 2019: Warning - Spoiler alert!

    The device was created and designed by Radomir Dopieralski, a long time EuroPython regular and enthusiastic Python device and robotics builder.

    The PewPew is a simplified game console, programmable with CircuitPython, a variant of MicroPython. It comes with a 64 LED display and a set of small buttons to drive the console.

    We will have one device per attendee with training or conference ticket and plan to give them out together with the badges.

  • sphinxcontrib-spelling 4.3.0

    sphinxcontrib-spelling is a spelling checker for Sphinx-based documentation. It uses PyEnchant to produce a report showing misspelled words.

  • Run-Length Encoding

More in Tux Machines

BlueStar Linux 5.2.1

Today we are looking at BlueStar Linux 5.2.1. This release of BlueStar is an Arch rolling distro and comes with Linux Kernel 5.2.1 and KDE Plasma 5.16.3 and uses about 700MB of ram when idling. Bluestar Linux is a beautiful Arch/KDE distro that works great out of the box and is receiving a lot of love from their very active developer. Read more Direct/video: BlueStar Linux 5.2.1 Run Through

GNU Parallel 20190722 ('Ryugu') released

GNU Parallel 20190722 ('Ryugu') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ GNU Parallel is 10 years old next year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17. Read more

today's howtos

Audiocasts/Shows: This Week in Linux, Command Line Heroes, DevNation Live Introducing Kogito and Python Podcast

  • Episode 75 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of Distro News with the first stable release of EndeavourOS, and we’ve also got new releases from Proxmox, deepin and FerenOS. Dropbox has decided to revert their weird decision of blocking various Linux Filesystems so we’ll talk about that. We’ve got some App News with KDE Connect now being available for macOS and a new release for the Foliate, ebook reader. Later in the show, we’ll cover some Linux Security news regarding a recently found piece of malware targeting the Linux Desktop. Then we’ll round out the show with some Linux Gaming news from Epic Games, Valve, Google Stadia and a new Humble Bundle. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • JavaScript's surprising rise from the ashes of the browser wars on Command Line Heroes

    The third season of the Command Line Heroes podcast continues its look at the history of the programming languages we depend on every day. Episode 3, released today, investigates the origin of JavaScript. Here's the unlikely story of how it happened.

  • DevNation Live: Introducing Kogito

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Quarkus, Kogito, and GraalVM from Red Hat’s Mario Fusco, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist. These days rule engines are often overlooked, possibly because people think that they are only useful inside heavyweight enterprise software products. However, this is not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraints from the main application flow. Drools is the rule engine of Red Hat, and our goal is to make it ready to be used in serverless environments.

  • Protecting The Future Of Python By Hunting Black Swans

    The Python language has seen exponential growth in popularity and usage over the past decade. This has been driven by industry trends such as the rise of data science and the continued growth of complex web applications. It is easy to think that there is no threat to the continued health of Python, its ecosystem, and its community, but there are always outside factors that may pose a threat in the long term. In this episode Russell Keith-Magee reprises his keynote from PyCon US in 2019 and shares his thoughts on potential black swan events and what we can do as engineers and as a community to guard against them.