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Ubuntu: NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04, Pick, Departure From i386 and Pop!_OS 19.04 Overview

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Ubuntu
  • How to install the latest version of NGINX on Ubuntu Server 18.04

    NGINX is one of the most popular web servers on the planet. It's reliable, scalable, and easy to use. But did you know, if you install NGINX from the default Ubuntu Server 18.04 repositories, the version you get is out of date? You don't want that. In fact, you probably want the most up-to-date stable release of the software.

  • Pick – A Color Picker for Ubuntu with History Support

    For Ubuntu 18.04 and higher, you can easily install the tool from Ubuntu Software as it has been made as snap package.

  • Ubuntu Confirms It’s Dropping All 32-bit Support Going Forward

    Ubuntu has confirmed plans to drop all support for 32-bit (i386) systems going forward, beginning with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release.

    The decision will mean that the distro no longer builds, packages or distributes any 32-bit software, libraries or tools on newer versions of Ubuntu.

    Users of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 32-bit are not affected by today’s announcement and will (should?) continue to work as normal, with access to the existing 32-bit archive.

    But the move will mean they are unable to upgrade to a newer Ubuntu release — nope, not even the next LTS!

    Will such a major sounding change have much of an impact?

    Eh, no, not really.

    Ubuntu says it’s stranding a mere 1% of its current user base on 32-bit version Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (which isn’t terrible place to stay, as it is supported until 2023).

  • i386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan (Ubuntu 19.10)
    Last year, the Ubuntu developer community considered the question of whether
    to continue carrying forward the i386 architecture in the Ubuntu archive for
    future releases.[1]  The discussion at the time was inconclusive, but in
    light of the strong possibility that we might not include i386 as a release
    architecture in 20.04 LTS, we took the proactive step to disable upgrades
    from 18.04 to 18.10 for i386 systems[2], to avoid accidentally stranding
    users on an interim release with 9 months of support instead of letting them
    continue to run Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with its 5 years of standard support.
    
    
    
    
    In February of this year, I also posted to communicate the timeline in which
    we would take a final decision about i386 support in 20.04 LTS[3], namely,
    that we would decide in the middle of 2019.
    
    
    
    
    The middle of 2019 has now arrived.   The Ubuntu engineering team has
    reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to
    carry i386 forward as an architecture.   Consequently, i386 will not be
    included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin
    the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu
    infrastructure.
    
    
    
    
    While this means we will not provide 32-bit builds of new upstream versions
    of libraries, there are a number of ways that 32-bit applications can
    continue to be made available to users of later Ubuntu releases, as detailed
    in [4].   We will be working to polish the 32-bit support story over the
    course of the 19.10 development cycle.  To follow the evolution of this
    support, you can participate in the discourse thread at [5].
  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Drop 32-bit x86 Packages

    Ubuntu and their downstream flavors all stopped shipping x86 32-bit images and now for the 19.10 cycle they have decided to stop their i386 support entirely. Beginning with Ubuntu 19.10, the archive/packages will not be built for x86 32-bit. 

    Longtime Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced their decision today that the i386 architecture will be dropped starting with Ubuntu 19.10, affecting all Ubuntu-based platforms / those relying upon the official Ubuntu Eoan archives. 

  • Pop!_OS 19.04 overview | Unleash your potential

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Pop!_OS 19.04 and some of the applications pre-installed.

Marius Nestor on Canonical Abandoning Old(er) PCs

  • Canonical Will Drop Support for 32-bit Architectures in Future Ubuntu Releases

    Canonical announced today that it finally decided to completely drop support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future releases of its popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.
    Last year, during the development cycle of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, Canonical announced that they won't offer 32-bit installation images (ISOs), a trend that was shortly followed by all official Ubuntu Linux flavors with the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release. However, Ubuntu's 32-bit repositories were still available.

    As Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) will be supported for the next five years, Canonical disabled upgrades from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS to Ubuntu 18.10 for 32-bit systems to avoid leaving users on a short-lived release, and now, they announced that starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) release, support for 32-bit system will no longer be provided.

Marius Nestor on the latest Linux patches for Ubuntu

  • Canonical Outs Important Linux Kernel Security Update for All Ubuntu Releases

    Canonical has released an important Linux kernel security update for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address two critical security vulnerabilities that could crash users' systems.

    In a recent security advisory, Canonical details two recently discovered security vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-11477 and CVE-2019-11478) affecting Linux kernel's TCP retransmission queue implementation when handling some specific TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACKs).

    Both security vulnerabilities were discovered by Jonathan Looney and could allow a remote attacker to crash the affected system by causing a denial of service. Known as SACK Panic, they affect all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

Ubuntu says i386 to be 86'd with Eoan 19.10 release

  • Ubuntu says i386 to be 86'd with Eoan 19.10 release: Ageing 32-bit x86 support will be ex-86

    Ubuntu is set to drop support for the i386 processor architecture beginning with its next release.

    Canonical, developer of the iconic Linux distro, said on Tuesday the 19.10 release, code named Eoan Ermine, will drop 32-bit i386 from its supported architectures, which include 64-bit AMD64 (x86-64) and 64-bit Armv8.

    "The Ubuntu engineering team has reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture," said Ubuntu desktop team member Will Cooke.

Ubuntu 19.10 To Completely Drop Support For 32-bit Architecture

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Completely Drop Support For 32-bit Architecture

    The 32-bit architecture used in Intel and other compatible CPUs is referred to as “i386” in the Debian and other communities of Linux distributions. However, as the legacy hardware that only runs a 32-bit operating system isn’t popular anymore, the major Linux distributions and software vendors are shifting away from it. To put things in perspective, there is a good chance that most of the computers made during the last decade only support 64-bit instructions.

    Ubuntu, the world’s most popular open source operating system, decided to ditch its plans to offer 32-bit installation images during its Ubuntu 17.10 development cycle. However, different 32-bit packages were still available to support existing users. Now, Canonical has announced it plans to completely drop support for such 32-bit packages.

By LWN

  • Ubuntu dropping i386 support

    Starting with the upcoming "Eoan Ermine" (a.k.a. 19.10) release, the Ubuntu distribution will not support 32-bit x86 systems.

Canonical won't release the next version of Ubuntu in 32-bit

  • Canonical won't release the next version of Ubuntu in 32-bit

    CANONICAL HAS ANNOUNCED that it will drop 32-bit support for Ubuntu in a forthcoming release.

    Starting with the forthcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine, apparently), Ubuntu builds will be available in 64-bit versions only, tapping another nail into the coffin of the ageing architecture.

    The move is an extension of last year's rollout of the recently-patched Ubuntu 18.04 LTS. Because that will be supported for five years, Ubuntu decided not to release a 32-bit edition, and prevented those on a previous 32-bit build from upgrading - a fresh install was required in 64-bit.

    Canonical is keen to point out that unless you have a creaky old lappy, it won't really change anything - 32-bit apps won't run in 64-bit Ubuntu directly, but many of the most popular apps that don't have a native 64-bit version are either already Ubuntu Snaps, or can be easily turned into them.

    The company will release details of what users need to do to be ready for version 19.10 ahead of its release in October 2019. Once the beta is ready, there'll be a lot more detail, in case anyone fancies updating early.

Ubuntu has decided to drop i386 (32-bit) architecture from...

  • Ubuntu has decided to drop i386 (32-bit) architecture from Ubuntu 19.10 onwards

    Yesterday the Ubuntu engineering team announced their decision to discontinue i386 (32-bit) as an architecture, from Ubuntu 19.10 onwards. In a post to the Ubuntu Developer Mailing List, Canonical’s Steve Langasek explains that “i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure.”

    Langasek also mentions that the specific distributions of builds, packages or distributes of the 32-bit software, libraries or tools will no longer work on the newer versions of Ubuntu. He also mentions that the Ubuntu team will be working on the 32-bit support, over the course of the 19.10 development cycle.

Canonical planning to drop 32bit support with Ubuntu 19.10

  • Canonical planning to drop 32bit support with Ubuntu 19.10 onwards

    As you might have heard by now, Canonical has made the decision to drop 32bit support from Ubuntu 19.10 onwards.

    Writing on the mailing list, as well as this post on Ubuntu's Community Hub, Canonical gave a reminder that the decision isn't coming without warning. It was proposed last year and it was followed up with another post detailing a final decision to be made in the middle of 2019. So here we are, the decision seems to have been made.

    The problem isn't hardware, as likely around 99% of people nowadays have a 64bit capable computer. Going by our own statistics, from what 2,254 users told us only 4 are using a 32bit Linux distribution. The issue then, is mainly software and libraries needed to actually run 32bit applications. This is where it sounds like there's going to be plenty of teething issues, with a number of people not too happy about the decision.

Original: I386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan

  • I386 architecture will be dropped starting with eoan (Ubuntu 19.10)

    Last year, the Ubuntu developer community considered the question of whether to continue carrying forward the i386 architecture in the Ubuntu archive for future releases. The discussion at the time was inconclusive, but in light of the strong possibility that we might not include i386 as a release architecture in 20.04 LTS, we took the proactive step to disable upgrades from 18.04 to 18.10 for i386 systems, to avoid accidentally stranding users on an interim release with 9 months of support instead of letting them continue to run Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with its 5 years of standard support.

    In February of this year, I also posted to communicate the timeline in which we would take a final decision about i386 support in 20.04 LTS, namely, that we would decide in the middle of 2019.

    The middle of 2019 has now arrived. The Ubuntu engineering team has reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture. Consequently, i386 will not be included as an architecture for the 19.10 release, and we will shortly begin the process of disabling it for the eoan series across Ubuntu infrastructure.

Wine developers worry

  • Wine Developers Concerned With Ubuntu Dropping 32-bit Support With Ubuntu 19.10

    Ubuntu's solution for using Wine on 32-bit going forward, which is to publish applications as snaps, or use an Ubuntu 18.04 LTS based LXD container that has full access to multiarch 32-bit WINE and related libraries, was also discussed by the Wine developers, with Vincent Povirk of CodeWeavers saying that there's no point putting much effort into this temporary solution. The maintainer of the Wine OBS repository also mentioned that he has no interest in maintaining so many libraries.

    So what's the solution for all of this? Not building Wine packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and later releases, or using the Steam runtime for the Wine packages seem to be the answers, but no final decision has been made yet.

    Ubuntu is not the first Linux distribution to go with 64-bit only releases. openSUSE leap did this as well, but it continues to provide all the 32-bit libraries needed to build and run Wine. From what the Ubuntu announcement and FAQ says about dropping the 32-bit x86 architecture, it's looks like there are no plans for doing something similar in Ubuntu.

On goes the i386 saga

  • Ubuntu Officially Announced it’s Dropping Support for 32-bit Packages Going Forward

    Ubuntu has officially announced about dropping the support for 32-bit (i386) systems going forward, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release.

    The 32-bit architecture is used in many Intel and Intel-compatible CPUs. It’s refereed as i386 in Ubuntu, Debian and some other Linux distributions.

    Many peoples prefer to use the more generic name called “x86” for 32-bit.

    32-bit packages were designed especially for legacy hardware’s that only runs a 32-bit operating system, which isn’t popular anymore.

    No manufacturers have produced any 32-bit computer hardware for desktop / laptop for last 10 years and it was made during the last decade.

    Most of the major Linux distributions (Red Hat) and software vendors (lack of support in the upstream Linux kernel, toolchains, and web browsers) were already dropped support for 32-bit.

  • Canonical Developer Tries Running GOG Games On 64-Bit-Only Ubuntu 19.10 Setup

    In response to the decision to drop 32-bit x86 support beginning in Ubuntu 19.10, Alan Pope of Canonical and longtime Ubuntu member decided to try running some GOG games under an Ubuntu 19.10 daily build that he configured to remove the 32-bit packages ahead of the actual removal. Unfortunately, his experience didn't go so smoothly.

    While Valve has the resources to come up with an effective solution to bypass the Ubuntu archives doing away with 32-bit packages on Ubuntu 19.10, the smaller outfits like GOG may have a more difficult time especially with not being as centralized as Steam. Pains could be involved at least in the short-term for those wanting to enjoy their 32-bit-focused games on newer Ubuntu releases.

  • Results of testing games on 64-bit only eoan (19.10)

    These don’t seem to be true for the limited testing I did. I would urge more testing and feedback. I’m also keen to hear if my testing strategy is flawed in any way. Bear in mind I’m trying to approach this from a “normal user” point of view who wants to download and run a game they already had in their collection, or a new title they just bought.

    I have a few (50) games in GOG that I have purchased over the years. I only had time to select a few at ~random. I picked 5 which gave me a representative sample of relatively modern stuff mixed with retro games, and a good mix between native Linux and native Windows titles.

Ubuntu is dropping i386 support and WINE developers are irked

  • Ubuntu is dropping i386 support and WINE developers are irked

    As of version 19.10, Ubuntu will no longer support i386. With the arrival of Eoan Ermine, Ubuntu is severing 32-bit ties, and some developers are concerned.

    The move is not entirely unexpected. The Ubuntu developers had previously said it would make an i386 decision in the middle of 2019. That time having rolled around, the Ubuntu engineering team says that it "has reviewed the facts before us and concluded that we should not continue to carry i386 forward as an architecture". WINE developers are among those unhappy with the decision.

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