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Ubuntu 19.10 Dropping 32-bit Support Leaves Developers Fuming

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There will be no 32-bit support at all in Ubuntu 19.10. This is problematic for developers of Wine and Steam and gaming on Ubuntu might be in trouble.
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Devs unhappy with Ubuntu for dropping 32bit

All this whining over playing games?? How about you grow up and use a computer for productivity and communications and buy a game machine to play games on. The PS4 runs on linux and appears to have no shortage of great gaming.

It's well past time to put the 32bit architecture behind us. Wine seems useful for running MSOffice on a linux box and many other productivity softwares. And they're available in 64bit versions.

I don't see why, after more than a decade of 64bit growth, devs should have to maintain both platforms.

The developers

I think it's them who are most upset.

Steam will not support Ubuntu 19.10 onwards

  • Steam will not support Ubuntu 19.10 onwards

    It is only a few days since Canonical announced that it was dropping support for 32-bit packages as of Ubuntu 19.10. The fall out from this is now being felt.

    While there were many developers who were not happy with the decision, Linux-based gamers are now likely to be more than slightly annoyed. Steam has announced that "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users".

Ubuntu Developer Talks Down Impact Of 32-Bit

  • Ubuntu Developer Talks Down Impact Of 32-Bit Changes For Ubuntu 19.10

    Following Valve saying they won't be officially supporting Ubuntu 19.10 and Wine developers questioning their Ubuntu 32-bit builds following the announcement this week of not providing new 32-bit packages for new Ubuntu releases, longtime Ubuntu developer and Canonical employee Steve Langasek is trying to provide some clarity into the situation.

Steam Is About to Drop Official Support for Ubuntu

  • Steam Is About to Drop Official Support for Ubuntu

    Valve is dropping official support for Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases for its mega-popular Steam video game distribution platform, per Engadget, as the upcoming version of the OS will eliminate updates to 32-bit x86 components. According to Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais, the company will “evaluate ways to minimize breakage for existing users,” though it will also be focusing on “a different distribution, currently TBD.”

A couple more

  • Steam will stop supporting Ubuntu Linux over 32-bit compatibility
  • Canonical’s Decision To Drop 32-Bit Support In Ubuntu Upsets The Linux Gaming Community

    The future of Linux gaming sure is going to be interesting, as Canonical has announced this week that it’s going to be scrapping 32-bit support with Ubuntu 19.10. This was something considered last year, and clearly, even after all of the debate about whether or not it should happen, Canonical feels it’s best to pull the plug and look to the future.

    There are some problems with that, but before we go further, we do want to make clear that this decision is Canonical’s own. The myriad spins based on Ubuntu could take it upon themselves to continue supporting 32-bit libraries. For gamers, what this move means is that Ubuntu is no longer going to be the de facto “simple” choice for Linux gaming.

This could be the start of the fall of Ubuntu as de facto distro

  • Ubuntu is dropping support for 32-bit apps and games, so Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu

    Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system is one of the biggest names in desktop GNU/Linux. But if you plan to play PC games on Linux, you might want to start looking around for a different Linux distro.

    Ubuntu developer Steve Langasek announced last week that starting with Ubuntu 19:10, which comes out in October, Canonical would no longer provide 32-bit builds of applications and libraries. This being Linux, there will be workarounds — but many existing apps may not work out of the box anymore.

    Case in point: a number of games from GOG cannot be installed on a pre-release version of Ubuntu 19:10. So it’s not all that surprising that a developer for Valve says that now that Canonical is dropping support for 32-bit software, Valve’s Steam game client is dropping support for Ubuntu.

Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?

  • Rumour: Ubuntu NOT Dropping 32-bit App Support After All?

    That’s according to Canonical’s Steve Langasek, the author of the original “end of 32-bit support” mailing list post that led to a colourful parade of opinions from users, developers and software projects over the past few days..

    Reaction to the mailing list post’s implication that Ubuntu will no longer support 32-bit apps culminated in a dramatic decision by Valve, who say Steam for Linux will not support Ubuntu 19.10.

    Now, in a forum reply on the Ubuntu Discourse, Langasek appears to row back on the notion that 32-bit libraries will be removed wholesale in the ‘Eoan Ermine’, writing:

    “I’m sorry that we’ve given anyone the impression that we are ‘dropping support for i386 applications‘. It is simply not the case. What we are dropping is updates to the i386 libraries, which will be frozen at the 18.04 LTS versions.”

  • Would Steam Losing Ubuntu Support Make You Switch Distro? [Poll]

    Gamers the globe over were left open-mouthed by a Valve developer’s tweet that Steam for Linux is dropping support for Ubuntu as of the next release, Ubuntu 19.10.

    That snippet of shock followed an announcement by Canonical developers that there’d be no traditional access to 32-bit libraries in the next short-term release of the famed Linux distro.

    While confusion remains as to Canonical’s exact plans for the 32-bit Ubuntu archive — going away entirely? Just being frozen? Something else? — many Ubuntu users have taken to social media to state that if Steam goes from Ubuntu, so will they.

    Would a lack of official support for using the world’s biggest games distribution platform and shop store front on Ubuntu be enough to make YOU switch distro?

Steam Will No Longer Support Ubuntu : Valve

  • Steam Will No Longer Support Ubuntu : Valve

    Ubuntu users are having a bad week as now Valve says that steam won’t support Ubuntu any more. Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais revealed this shocking news in this tweet.

Valve Says Steam for Linux Won't Support Ubuntu 19.10

  • Valve Says Steam for Linux Won't Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

    Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases.

    The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users.

Steam Won’t Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

  • Steam Won’t Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

    Do you use Steam on Ubuntu? You may have to switch to a new Linux distro in the future. A Valve developer announced that Steam won’t officially support Ubuntu 19.10 or future releases. Ubuntu-based Linux distributions are also affected.

    This is all because Canonical announced plans to drop 32-bit packages and libraries from Ubuntu 19.10. These packages enable 32-bit software to run on 64-bit versions of Ubuntu.

    While most Linux applications will get along just fine, this is a huge blow to Valve’s Steam. Many Linux games on Steam are only available in 32-bit form—they work on 64-bit Linux distributions, but only with the 32-bit libraries. As Phoronix recently pointed out, this also affects the Wine compatibility layer that allows running Windows software on Linux—Wine won’t be able to run 32-bit Windows software anymore. Steam’s compatibility layer for running Windows games on Linux would also not work for 32-bit games.

Steam To Drop Support For Ubuntu Linux

  • Steam To Drop Support For Ubuntu Linux

    While the number of gaming titles being made available on Linux is increasing each month, it’s widely accepted that gaming remains one of the weakest points of all Linux based operating systems. There are options like Pop!_OS, Manjaro, etc., that deliver considerably better performance, but they’re also heavily dependent on the Valve-owned Steam game distribution platform.

    Just recently, we reported Ubuntu’s plans to completely drop the support for 32-bit packages. Earlier, during the Ubuntu 17.10 development cycle, Canonical announced its plans to ditch the 32-bit installation images. Along the similar lines, Canonical had also disabled the upgrades from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS to Ubuntu 18.10.

Another Response From Canonical/Ubuntu

  • I am running Steam/Wine on Ubuntu 19.10 (no 32-bit on the host)

    I like to take care of my desktop Linux and I do so by not installing 32-bit libraries. If there are any old 32-bit applications, I prefer to install them in a LXD container. Because in a LXD container you can install anything, and once you are done with it, you delete it and poof it is gone forever!

    In the following I will show the actual commands to setup a LXD container for a system with an NVidia GPU so that we can run graphical programs. Someone can take these and make some sort of easy-to-use GUI utility. Note that you can write a GUI utility that uses the LXD API to interface with the system container.

Steam to Soon Drop Support of Ubuntu

  • Steam to Soon Drop Support of Ubuntu

    The all-powerful folks over at Valve have announced that Steam will soon not support the Linux-based operating system Ubuntu. Starting from the upcoming version 19.10, all future versions of Ubuntu will not be supported and also won’t be recommended to users as a compatible OS.

Valve to drop Steam support for Ubuntu Linux

  • Valve to drop Steam support for Ubuntu Linux

    Valve has announced it is pulling support for its Steam digital distribution platform on Canonical's Ubuntu Linux operating system, after the company revealed plans to drop 32-bit support.

    Valve's interest in Linux is storied and ongoing: While the company focused, naturally enough, on Windows for the launch of its now-ubiquitous Steam digital distribution platform, the company announced Linux support in 2012 and launched in in 2013 via Canonical's Ubuntu Software Centre. When Valve announced its own Linux-based gaming operating system in 2013, it extended its efforts with the operating system; Steam Play, launched late last year, allowed Steam for Linux to play Windows games through a compatibility shim dubbed Proton.

    Now, though, Valve has indicated that it is to drop support for the popular Ubuntu Linux distribution - though not Linux in general - over maintainer Canonical's decision to stop developing 32-bit libraries.

  • Steam will no longer be officially supporting Ubuntu for future updates

    Valve‘s video game megastore Steam will no longer be supported for Linux operating systems after October of this year.

    Announced by Valve’s Pierre-Loup Griffais on Twitter, the company will officially be dropping support for future versions of the Linux distro.

    Those who frequently use Ubuntu will have until the OS’ next update, 19.10, to move another OS before Valve’s services become unsupported. The update is planned to release on October 17th, just four months away.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 looks DOA for gamers, with Valve dropping support for the OS

    Apple, Canonical and Microsoft may have switched to distributing 64-Bit OSs a few years ago, but Mac OS X, Ubuntu and Windows all still support the 32-bit architecture. Microsoft integrates Windows 32-bit on Windows 64-bit (WoW64) for example, while the current version of Ubuntu still supports 32-bit. That is, until now.

    Starting with 19.10 Ubuntu will contain only 64-bit code, with Canonical removing all 32-bit support. In short, no 32-bit applications will run on future versions of Ubuntu. This may not seem noteworthy considering that developers have had years to upgrade their software to 64-bit. However, Ubuntu 19.10 and newer will prevent even 64-bit applications from executing any 32-bit libraries or packages.

  • Steam is boiling as Ubuntu turns half its library into vapourware

    GAMING PORTAL Steam has announced it will ditch official support for Linux Ubuntu starting with the next release.

    Last week, Canonical announced it would not be offering 32-bit builds of its software in future, and Steam responded with an almighty "erm - no".

    Steam has pledged to do everything it can to avoid leaving anyone in the lurch but will be moving its attention to a yet-to-be-determined alternative Linux flavour soon.

    The big problem for Steam is that so many of its classic games were only ever made available in 32-bit. By dropping support for the ageing architecture, it is essentially putting Steam in a position of borking half of the games in its library, whether that be by hiding them in the GUI or having them throw up an error code. Either way, it's not a good look.

    Although there are lots of options, alternative operating systems, custom builds, emulators and so on, it's not the same as having an out-of-the-box experience.

  • Steam Linux likely to not support future versions of Ubuntu

    Steam’s Linux version will not support future versions of popular and newbie-friendly distribution Ubuntu, Valve have said. The news came after Ubuntu’s makers said they’d drop 32-bit as of the next big release in October, which sounded like it would leave the great many 32-bit Steam games unplayable. Valve said they were now planning to “switch our focus” to another Linux distro. Ubuntu have since pivoted to say they’re not dropping 32-bit, they’re just going to stop updating it, which is better but still a bit of a dead end.

  • Steam is Dropping Support of Ubuntu Soon

    If you use Linux-based operating system Ubuntu to play games on Steam, you might want to think about an alternative solution. As per a tweet from Valve coder Pierre-Loup Griffais over the weekend, future versions of Ubuntu will not be officially supported by Steam, nor will it be recommended to users as a compatible OS.

    The first version of Ubuntu to not be supported will be 19.10, which is scheduled to release on 17th October. That means Ubuntu users have just shy of four months to enjoy official Steam support before it's a thing of the past.

  • Steam to drop support for Ubuntu but Linux users shouldn’t panic yet

    The majority of the time that Linux gets dragged in the spotlight is when there are high-profile security bugs that remind people how Linux practically runs the world behind the scenes. This time, however, the controversy is ironically around one of the operating system’s weakest points: gaming. A Valve developer just “announced” on Twitter that the company will be dropping support for future releases of Ubuntu and, as expected, it has driven Linux users into a slight frenzied panic.

  • Out of Steam, Wine draining away? Ubuntu's 64-bit only decision is causing problems

    Canonical's decision to cease development of 32-bit libraries in Ubuntu 19.10 "eoan" means it won't support Steam gaming runtime and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be little use.

    The Steam news was reported on Twitter by Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais, who said "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users."

    Ubuntu has caused anxiety with its announcement that "the i386 architecture will be dropped" in the next release. Some presumed this meant i386 libraries would not be shipped at all, meaning that no 32-bit applications would run.

Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10

  • Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

    Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely deprecate support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, due for release later this fall on October 17th. However, the company mentioned the fact that while 32-bit support is going away, there will still be ways to run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS.

    As Canonical didn't give more details on the matter at the time of the announcement, many users started complaining about how they will be able to run certain 32-bit apps and games on upcoming Ubuntu releases. Valve was also quick to announce that their Steam for Linux client won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases, so now Canonical has clarified the situation a bit saying only updates to 32-bit libraries are dropped.

Statement on 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS

  • Statement on 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS

    Thanks to the huge amount of feedback this weekend from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community, we will change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS.

    We will put in place a community process to determine which 32-bit packages are needed to support legacy software, and can add to that list post-release if we miss something that is needed.

    Community discussions can sometimes take unexpected turns, and this is one of those. The question of support for 32-bit x86 has been raised and seriously discussed in Ubuntu developer and community forums since 2014. That’s how we make decisions.

More of 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS

  • Ubuntu To Provide Select 32-Bit Packages For Ubuntu 19.10 & 20.04 LTS

    It looks like my info from this weekend was accurate, "I'm hearing that Canonical may revert course and provide limited 32-bit support." Canonical issued a statement today that they indeed will provide "selected" 32-bit packages for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 as well as Ubuntu 20.04 LTS.

    Canonical announced that as a result of feedback, they "changed our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS...We will put in place a community process to determine which 32-bit packages are needed to support legacy software, and can add to that list post-release if we miss something that is needed."

  • Canonical returning 32-bit Ubuntu Linux support after gaming uproar

    At first glance, Canonical dropping support for 32-bit Ubuntu Linux libraries looked to be interesting -- the end of an era -- but of no real importance. Then, Canonical announced that, beginning with October's Ubuntu 19.10 release, 32-bit -computer support would be dropped. And both developers and users screamed their objections.

    Canonical listened and has changed course. "Thanks to the huge amount of feedback this weekend from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community, we will change our plan and build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS."

Ubuntu Changed their stand

  • Ubuntu Changed their stand in dropping support of 32-bit i386 Packages

    Ubuntu gave a press release about their stand for 32-bit i386 packages. They will be building selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. But not a full one.

    Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely dropping support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system.

    After this announcement, many of the users started complaining about how they will be able to run the 32-bit apps and games on upcoming Ubuntu releases.

    At the same time, after three days. Valve announced that Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to their users.

    They will evaluate ways to minimize breakage for existing users, but they will switch to a different distribution, currently TBD.

    Ubuntu has reversed their decision based on the community response.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu

Additional coverage of Ubuntu's reversal on i386

  • Canonical backtracks on pulling 32-bit support from Ubuntu Linux

    Last week, Ubuntu announced it would end support for 32-bit applications, starting with its next release.

  • Ubuntu Reverses Decision, Says It Will Continue To Support 32-bit Apps

    Canonical has issued a statement on Ubuntu’s 32-bit future — and gamers, among others, are sure to relieved!

    The company says Ubuntu WILL now continue to build and maintain a 32-bit archive going forward — albeit, not a full one.

    In a response emailed to me (but presumably posted online somewhere) the company cite “the huge amount of feedback this weekend from gamers, Ubuntu Studio, and the WINE community” for persuading them to change track.

    That outcry, almost unparalleled in Ubuntu’s history, resulted in Valve, makers of the hugely popular games distribution service Steam, announcing that it would not support future Ubuntu releases.

    This, combined with worries from users relaying on legacy applications or Windows-only software ran through WINE, has resulted in a change of plans.

    Accordingly, Canonical says it “…will build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS,” they say.

    Notice the word “selected” there. It seems the full 32-bit archive we enjoy now wont stick around, but a curated collection of libraries, tooling and other packages will be made available.

  • Raspberry Pi 4 on Sale Now, SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 Released, Instaclustr Service Broker Now Available, Steam for Linux to Drop Support for Ubuntu 19.10 and Beyond, and Linux 5.2-rc6 Is Out

    Valve developer announces that Steam for Linux will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release and future Ubuntu releases. Softpedia News reports that "Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases. The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users."

  • Canonical foolishly backpedals on 32-bit packages in Ubuntu Linux

    Having an open mind and admitting when you are wrong is a noble quality. Those that are stubborn and continue with bad ideas just to save face are very foolish. With all of that said, sometimes you have to stick with your decisions despite negative feedback because you know they are right. After all, detractors can often be very loud, but not necessarily large in numbers. Not to mention, you can't please everyone, so being indecisive or "wishy-washy" in an effort to quash negativity can make you look weak. And Canonical looks very weak today.

    When the company announced it was planning to essentially stop supporting 32-bit packages beginning with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10, I was quite impressed. Look, folks, it is 2019 -- 64-bit processors have been commonplace for a long time. It's time to pull the damn 32-bit band-aid off and get on with things. Of course, there was some negativity surrounding the decision -- as is common with everything in the world today. In particular, developers of WINE were upset, since their Windows compatibility layer depends on 32-bit, apparently. True Linux users would never bother with WINE, but I digress.

  • Ubuntu Reverses Decision, Says It Will Continue To Support 32-bit Packages

    Canonical has issued a statement on Ubuntu's 32-bit future, saying it will continue to build and maintain a 32-bit archive going forward.

More coverage: Valve and Ubuntu

  • Steam is dropping support for Ubuntu, but not Linux entirely
  • Steam ending support for Ubuntu over 32-bit compatibility
  • Out of Steam? Wine draining away? Ubuntu's 64-bit-only x86 decision is causing migraines

    Canonical's decision to effectively ditch official support for 32-bit x86 in Ubuntu 19.10 means the Steam gaming runtime is likely to run aground on the Linux operating system – and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be of little use.

    As a result of the changes, Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais confirmed on Twitter: "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users." This is because Steam relies on 32-bit x86, aka i386, support for running older games that are 32-bit-only. Without official 32-bit x86 support in Ubuntu, Valve is walking away from the Linux distro.

  • Ubuntu Compromises on 32-Bit App Support

    Canonical, the developer of Ubuntu, has backtracked on an earlier announcement that Ubuntu 19.10 will no longer update 32-bit packages and applications, announcing today that Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 will support select 32-bit apps.

    The news follows Valve and the developers of Wine, an open source compatibility layer for running Windows apps on other operating systems, saying they would stop supporting Ubuntu completely.

  • Steam to End Support for Ubuntu

    Canonical's decision to stop updating 32-bit libraries has seen Valve react by stating Ubuntu will no longer be officially supported from Ubuntu 19.10 onwards.

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