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Linux Foundation Keynotes and Puff Pieces (Linode and ONS)

  • Linode Puts Powerful Nvidia GPUs In Its Linux Cloud

    Linode today launched new GPU-optimized cloud computing instances tailored specifically for developers and businesses requiring massive parallel computational power. The new instances are built on NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 GPU cards with all three major types of processing cores (CUDA, Tensor, and Real-Time Ray Tracing) available to users. Linode is one of the first cloud providers to deploy NVIDIA’s latest GPU architecture.

  • Linode Brings Commercial Grade GPUs to the Masses
  • Linode Brings Commercial Grade GPUs to the Masses

    Linode has launched new GPU-optimized cloud computing instances tailored specifically for developers and businesses requiring massive parallel computational power. These new GPU instances give scientists, artists, and engineers working on artificial intelligence, graphic visualization, and complex modeling a cost-competitive alternative to hyperscale cloud providers.

  • Linux Foundation and LF Networking Announce Keynote Highlights for Open Networking Summit Europe

    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open networking projects, today announced the initial line-up of keynote speakers and panelists for Open Networking Summit Europe. The event takes place September 23-25 in Antwerp, Belgium.

    Open Networking Summit (ONS) is the industry’s premier open networking event, enabling collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers and cloud providers. The event provides a platform for discussing the future of Open Networking, including how networking and adjacent technologies like 5G, SDN/NFV, VNF/CNF, Cloud Native Networking, Network Automation, Edge, AI, Access and IOT, Access & IoT services. Following 2018’s inaugural event outside of North America, ONS Europe 2019 continues to provide expanded opportunities for more individuals to share, learn and collaborate on these important and emerging technologies.

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today's howtos

Audiocasts/Shows: This Week in Linux, Command Line Heroes, DevNation Live Introducing Kogito and Python Podcast

  • Episode 75 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got a lot of Distro News with the first stable release of EndeavourOS, and we’ve also got new releases from Proxmox, deepin and FerenOS. Dropbox has decided to revert their weird decision of blocking various Linux Filesystems so we’ll talk about that. We’ve got some App News with KDE Connect now being available for macOS and a new release for the Foliate, ebook reader. Later in the show, we’ll cover some Linux Security news regarding a recently found piece of malware targeting the Linux Desktop. Then we’ll round out the show with some Linux Gaming news from Epic Games, Valve, Google Stadia and a new Humble Bundle. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • JavaScript's surprising rise from the ashes of the browser wars on Command Line Heroes

    The third season of the Command Line Heroes podcast continues its look at the history of the programming languages we depend on every day. Episode 3, released today, investigates the origin of JavaScript. Here's the unlikely story of how it happened.

  • DevNation Live: Introducing Kogito

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about Quarkus, Kogito, and GraalVM from Red Hat’s Mario Fusco, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist. These days rule engines are often overlooked, possibly because people think that they are only useful inside heavyweight enterprise software products. However, this is not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraints from the main application flow. Drools is the rule engine of Red Hat, and our goal is to make it ready to be used in serverless environments.

  • Protecting The Future Of Python By Hunting Black Swans

    The Python language has seen exponential growth in popularity and usage over the past decade. This has been driven by industry trends such as the rise of data science and the continued growth of complex web applications. It is easy to think that there is no threat to the continued health of Python, its ecosystem, and its community, but there are always outside factors that may pose a threat in the long term. In this episode Russell Keith-Magee reprises his keynote from PyCon US in 2019 and shares his thoughts on potential black swan events and what we can do as engineers and as a community to guard against them.

Community Snapcrafter on MicroK8s, summits and the evolving nature of snaps

In January 2018, Dan Llewellyn joined his first Snapcraft Summit in Seattle in his role as a community Snapcrafter. At that event, we discussed his views on everything snap related from most requested snaps, new feature requests and popular discussion topics. Since then, snaps has grown across every metric and seen numerous new high profile snaps enter the store including Microsoft Visual Studio Code, a suite from JetBrains, Opera and more. We took the opportunity at the most recent Snapcraft Summit in Montreal to get Dan’s insider perspective 18 months on. “Snaps are reaching ubiquity. People using or building snaps no longer think of themselves as early adopters, but more adhering to the status quo,” Dan observes. There has been a “natural progression” in the growth trajectory that snaps have experienced. Dan believes part of this is driven by developers seeing the likes of Microsoft, Amazon and Google publishing software in the Snap Store. Similarly, Dan has noticed an increase in commercial interest in the format compared to individual developers in the earlier days. Dan also suggests two additional factors for the increased adoption. Firstly, the availability in the Ubuntu store with desktop users being served snaps first over other formats. Secondly, the crossover with the Docker container story – users like the throwaway nature. They can do their work, delete and start again with the next build. Such trends are evident in the nature of the forum conversation as well with less discussion around how to build snaps and far more around the management of existing snaps. He has also seen less around the automatic update feature which he believes is due to the message resonating and it is now a given. “People are comfortable with the feature and expect automatic updates when originally they may have been sceptical if it would work on a desktop or IoT device,” Dan adds. Talking of IoT, Dan has seen an uplift in topics around the internet of things given the benefits snaps can bring to embedded devices. Read more