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Linux 5.3 Features and the Linux Foundation's (Openwashing) Work for Surveillance Giants

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  • Linux 5.3 Picks Up Utilization Clamping - Ensuring GUI Threads Get Maximum Frequency

    The scheduler changes for the Linux 5.3 kernel are as busy as ever.

    One of the most interesting scheduler changes for Linux 5.3 was made by Arm's Patrick Bellasi. The addition is introducing utilization clamping support as an extension of their work on the Energy Aware Scheduling framework in order to boost some workloads while capping background workloads. Energy Aware Scheduling factors in the CPU topology of modern hardware -- particularly Arm big.LITTLE designs -- with differing power and performance characteristics in order to better schedule what CPU cores should be used for a given workload.

  • Linux 5.3 Continues Advancing Intel's Sound Open Firmware

    Linux sound subsystem maintainer Takashi Iwai sent in the big set of audio driver changes for Linux 5.3.

    Linux 5.3 is continuing where Linux 5.2 left off when it added a lot of their Sound Open Firmware kernel code that has been in development for over one year as the Intel-led effort for having open-source audio DSP firmware and SDK. Sound Open Firmware is used by the newest and future Google Chromebooks among other use-cases to come about.

  • The Linux Foundation Breathes New Life into Osquery

    Anyone who has been tasked with monitoring the security of server instances in a data center or cloud knows how laborious and time-consuming it can be. Osquery, a project started by Facebook, aims to lessen this burden by reframing how developers engage with their infrastructures. DevOps professionals can use Osquery to expose an operating system as a high-performance relational database, making it possible to use SQL commands to access data about a system, just as they would for a database. 

    Osquery works on Mac, Linux and Windows systems and is provided as an open source download via GitHub. Although Osquery was developed by Facebook to monitor and safeguard the security of its own platform, the social media giant quickly realized the utility of the platform would extend to other enterprises that depend upon insight into the low-level behavior of operating systems. 

Linux's Perf Subsystem Begins Prepping For Snow Ridge

  • Linux's Perf Subsystem Begins Prepping For Snow Ridge, Other New Intel Hardware Support

    Snow Ridge is the SoC Intel announced last December as a 10nm product intended for 5G products. With the in-development Linux 5.3 kernel is initial "perf" subsystem support for Snow Ridge.

    The perf subsystem support for the Snow Ridge bring-up has uncore support so far. There is also a number of PMU/uncore driver updates for Intel's Icelake, Kabylake, Amberlake, and Whiskeylake processors.

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