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Fedora: Google Code-in, Python and NeuroFedora

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Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: GCI 2018 mentor’s summit @ Google headquarters

    Google Code-in is a contest to introduce students (ages 13-17) to open source software development. Since 2010, 8,108 students from 107 countries have completed over 40,100 open source tasks Because Google Code-in is often the first experience many students have with open source, the contest is designed to make it easy for students to jump right in. I was one of the mentors in this first time for Fedora program. We had 125 students participating in Fedora and the top 3 students completed 26, 25 and 22 tasks each.

    Every year Google invites the Grand-Prize winners and their parents, and a mentor to it’s headquarters in San Francisco, California for a 4 days trip. I was offered the opportunity to go and represent Fedora in the summit and meet these 2 brilliant folks in person. This report covers activities and other things that happened there.

  • Fedora mulls its "python" version

    There is no doubt that the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 has been a difficult one, but Linux distributions have been particularly hard hit. For many people, that transition is largely over; Python 2 will be retired at the end of this year, at least by the core development team. But distributions will have to support Python 2 for quite a while after that. As part of any transition, the version that gets run from the python binary (or symbolic link) is something that needs to be worked out. Fedora is currently discussing what to do about that for Fedora 31.

    Fedora program manager Ben Cotton posted a proposal to make python invoke Python 3 in Fedora 31 to the Fedora devel mailing list. The proposal, titled "Python means Python 3", is also on the Fedora wiki. The idea is that wherever "python" is used it will refer to version 3, including when it is installed by DNF (i.e. dnf install python) or when Python packages are installed, so installing "python-requests" will install the Python 3 version of the Requests library. In addition, a wide array of associated tools (e.g. pip, pylint, idle, and flask) will also use the Python 3 versions.

    The "Requests" link above does point to a potential problem area, however. It shows that Requests for Python 3 III is not fully finished, with an expected release sometime "before PyCon 2020" (mid-April 2020), which is well after the expected October 2019 release of Fedora 31. The distribution already has a python3-requests package, though, so that will be picked up as python-requests in Fedora 31 if this proposal is adopted. There may be other packages out there where Python 3 support is not complete but, at this point, most of the major libraries have converted.

  • NeuroFedora poster at CNS*2019

    With CNS*2019 around the corner, we worked on getting the NeuroFedora poster ready for the poster presentation session. Our poster is P96, on the first poster session on the 14th of July.

    [...]

    Unfortunately, this time, no one from the team is able to attend the conference, but if you are there and want to learn more about NeuroFedora, please get in touch with us using any of our communication channels.

    To everyone that will be in Barcelona for the conference, we hope you have a fruitful one, and of course, we hope you are able to make some time to rest at the beach too.

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