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Graphics: Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha and RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • weston 6.0.91
    This is the alpha release for weston 7.0.  A lot of new features and
    fixes are shipped in this release, including:
    
    - New internal debug scopes and logging framework
    - Improved documentation
    - HDCP support
    - A new PipeWire plugin
    
    Thanks to all contributors!
    
    We've moved to Meson as our only build system, autotools support has
    been removed.  Package maintainers: please report any issues you have
    with Meson before the stable release.
    
    Full commit history below.
    
  • Weston 7.0 Reaches Alpha With PipeWire, HDCP, EGL Partial Updates & Mores

    Wayland release manager Simon Ser announced the alpha release of the Weston 7.0 reference compositor on Friday that also marks the feature freeze for this Wayland compositor update.

    Some of the major changes to Weston 7.0 include HDCP content protection support, better documentation, new debugging and logging framework support, and the just-added PipeWire plug-in for remote streaming. There are also less prominent additions like EGL partial update support, various DRM compositor back-end restructuring, build system updates, and a variety of libweston updates.

  • RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support

    One of the new features to the RDNA architecture with Navi is support for single cycle issue Wave32 execution on SIMD32. Up to now the RadeonSI code was using just Wave64 but now there is support in this AMD open-source Linux OpenGL driver for Wave32.

    Well known AMD open-source developer Marek Olšák landed this Wave32 support on Friday for the RadeonSI driver. The Wave32 support landed over several commits to Mesa 19.2-devel and is enabled for vertex, geometry, and tessellation shaders. Wave32 isn't enabled for pixel shaders but rather Wave64. Additionally, Wave32 isn't yet enabled for compute shaders due to Piglit OpenGL test case failures.

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Cryptojacking Code Found in 11 Open Libraries, Thousands Infected

    A cryptojacking code was found in 11 open-source code libraries written in Ruby, which have been downloaded thousands of times. Hackers downloaded the software, infected it with malware, and subsequently reposted it on the RubyGems platform, industry news outlet Decrypt reported on Aug. 21.

  • Malicious cryptojacking code found in 11 Ruby libraries

    Cryptojacking software has been found in 11 code libraries for the programming language Ruby—exposing thousands of people. The latest heist, discovered yesterday on code repository Github made use of a package manager called RubyGems, a popular program that allows developers to upload and share improvements on existing pieces of software.

  • Cryptojacking Scripts Found in 11 Open-Source Code Libraries

    According to a Decrypt report, the malware was discovered on Tuesday inside Github code repository, infecting the language manager called RubyGems.

  • First‑of‑its‑kind spyware sneaks into Google Play
  • Open-source spyware bypasses Google Play defenses — twice

    Radio Balouch — the app in question — is a legitimate radio application serving Balouchi music enthusiasts, except that it also included AhMyth, a remote access espionage tool that has been available on GitHub as an open-source project since late 2017. Lukas Stefanko, ESET researcher who uncovered the campaign, said the app was uploaded twice on Google Play — once on July 2 and a second time on July 13 — only to be swiftly removed by Google within 24 hours upon being alerted by the security team. It continues to be available on third-party app stores. While the service’s dedicated website “radiobalouch.com” is no longer accessible, the attackers also seem to have promoted the app on Instagram and YouTube. The app, in total, attracted over 100 installs.

  • 61 impacted versions of Apache Struts left off security advisories

    Security researchers have reviewed security advisories for Apache Struts and found that two dozen of them inaccurately listed affected versions for the open-source development framework. The advisories have since been updated to reflect vulnerabilities in an additional 61 unique versions of Struts that were affected by at least one previously disclosed vulnerability but left off the security advisories for those vulnerabilities.

  • Sectigo Sponsors Automated Certificate Issuance and Renewal in Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Certbot Open Source Software Tool

    Sectigo, the world’s largest commercial Certificate Authority (CA) and a provider of purpose-built and automated PKI management solutions, today announced its sponsorship of Electronic Frontier Foundation’s (EFF) free, open source software tool, Certbot, to support efforts to encrypt the entire internet and build a network that is more structurally private, safe, and protected against censorship.

GNU Parallel 20190822 ('Jesper Svarre') released [stable]

GNU Parallel 20190822 ('Jesper Svarre') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/ No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release. GNU Parallel is 10 years old next year on 2020-04-22. You are here by invited to a reception on Friday 2020-04-17. Read more

KDE ISO Image Writer – Release Announcement

My GSoC project comes to an end and I am going to conclude this series of articles by announcing the release of a beta version of KDE ISO Image Writer. Read more Also: How I got a project in Labplot KDE

Linux Foundation: Automotive Grade Linux Announcement and Calling Surveillance Operations "Confidential Computing"

  • Automotive Grade Linux Announces New Instrument Cluster Expert Group and UCB 8.0 Code Release

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), an open source project developing a shared software platform for in-vehicle technology, today announced a new working group focused on Instrument Cluster solutions, as well as the latest code release of the AGL platform, the UCB 8.0. The AGL Instrument Cluster Expert Group (EG) is working to reduce the footprint of AGL and optimize the platform for use in lower performance processors and low-cost vehicles that do not require an entire infotainment software stack. Formed earlier this year, the group plans to release design specifications later this year with an initial code release in early 2020. “AGL is now supported by nine major automotive manufacturers, including the top three producers by worldwide volume, and is currently being used in production for a range of economy and luxury vehicles” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “The new Instrument Cluster Expert Group, supported by several of these automakers, will expand the use cases for AGL by enabling the UCB platform to support solutions for lower-cost vehicles, including motorcycles.”

  • Shhh! Microsoft, Intel, Google and more sign up to the Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Linux Foundation has signed up the likes of Microsoft and Google for its Confidential Computing Consortium, a group with the laudable goal of securing sensitive data. The group – which also includes Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, IBM, Intel, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent – will be working on open-source technologies and standards to speed the adoption of confidential computing. The theory goes that while approaches to encrypting data at rest and in transit have supposedly been dealt with, assuming one ignores the depressingly relentless splurts of user information from careless vendors, keeping it safe while in use is quite a bit more challenging. Particularly as workloads spread to the cloud and IoT devices.

  • Tech giants come together to form cloud security watchdog

    Some of the world’s biggest technology companies are joining forces to improve the security of files in the cloud. This includes Google, IBM, Microsoft, Intel, and many others. The news first popped up on the Linux Foundation, where it was said that the Confidential Computing Consortium will work to bring industry standards and identify the proper tools to encrypt data used by apps, devices and online services. At the moment, cloud security solutions focus to protect data that’s either resting, or is in transit. However, when the data is being used is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.”

  • Tech firms join forces to boost cloud security

    Founding members of the group – which unites hardware suppliers, cloud providers, developers, open source experts and academics – include Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent. [...] “The earliest work on technologies that have the ability to transform an industry is often done in collaboration across the industry and with open source technologies,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation. “The Confidential Computing Consortium is a leading indicator of what is to come for security in computing and will help define and build open technologies to support this trust infrastructure for data in use.”

  • Google, Intel and Microsoft form data protection consortium
  • Intel Editorial: Intel Joins Industry Consortium to Accelerate Confidential Computing

    Leaders in information and infrastructure security are well versed in protecting data at-rest or in-flight through a variety of methods. However, data being actively processed in memory is another matter. Whether running on your own servers on-prem, in an edge deployment, or in the heart of a cloud service provider’s data center, this “in-use” data is almost always unencrypted and potentially vulnerable.

  • Confidential Computing: How Big Tech Companies Are Coming Together To Secure Data At All Levels

    Data today moves constantly from on-premises to public cloud and the edge, which is why it is quite challenging to protect. While there are standards available that aim to protect data when it is in rest and transit, standards related to protecting it when in use do not exist. Protecting data while in use is called confidential computing, which the Confidential Computing Consortium is aiming to create across the industry. The Confidential Computing Consortium, created under the Linux Foundation, will work to build up guidelines, systems and tools to ensure data is encrypted when it’s being used by applications, devices and online services. The consortium says that encrypting data when in use is “the third and possibly most challenging step to providing a fully encrypted lifecycle for sensitive data.” Members focused on the undertaking are Alibaba, ARM, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom and Tencent.

  • IT giants join forces for full-system data security

    Apple is conspiciously missing from the consortium, despite using both Intel hardware and inhouse designed ARM-based processors. Of the first set of commitments, Intel will release its Software Guard Extensions (SGX) software development kit as open source through the CCC.

  • Google, Intel, and Microsoft partner to improve cloud security

    Some of the biggest names in tech have banded together in an effort to promote industry-wide security standards for protecting data in use.

  • Alibaba, Baidu, Google, Microsoft, Others Back Confidential Computing Consortium

    The Confidential Computing Consortium aims to help define and accelerate open-source technology that keeps data in use secure. Data typically gets encrypted by service providers, but not when it’s in use. This consortium will focus on encrypting and processing the data “in memory” to reduce the exposure of the data to the rest of the system. It aims to provide greater control and transparency for users.

  • Microsoft, Intel and others are doubling down on open source Linux security

    In other words, the operating system could be compromised by some kind of malware, but the data being used in a program would still be encrypted, and therefore safe from an attacker.

  • Microsoft, Intel, and Red Hat Back Confidential Computing

    The Linux Foundation’s latest project tackles confidential computing with a group of companies that reads like a who’s who of cloud providers, chipmakers, telecom operators, and other tech giants. Today at the Open Source Summit the Linux Foundation said it will form a new group called the Confidential Computing Consortium. Alibaba, Arm, Baidu, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Red Hat, Swisscom, and Tencent all committed to work on the project, which aims to accelerate the adoption of confidential computing.