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Nils Brauckmann, SUSE's CEO, Steps Down (The first of many goodbyes)

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SUSE

I have recently made the decision to retire as the SUSE CEO and subsequently to leave SUSE. I care very deeply for the SUSE business and its employees, and this difficult decision is based entirely on personal reasons. My step down from the SUSE CEO role will be effective August 5.
My decision comes at a positive point in time for SUSE, where the business has completed its journey to becoming standalone and has a solid foundation to continue to accelerate its success and growth as an independent company.
For me personally this means I will have more time to devote myself to other important things in my life.
In FY18, the SUSE business saw record-breaking revenues. This level of growth has only been realized through the whole SUSE Team showing huge commitment to working together to deliver great outcomes. I am extremely proud of what we have achieved collectively over the last eight years, and I have every confidence that SUSE will exceed all future expectations. I will naturally be following the SUSE journey closely during my retirement, and my positive wishes will always be with the company and all connected with it.
As we look to the future I am delighted and, of course, reassured to be passing the SUSE CEO baton to such a talented and accomplished leader as Melissa Di Donato. Melissa has an outstanding track record of growth, leadership and transformation in the tech sector, having enjoyed enormous success as the chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP. Prior to SAP, she held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contribution to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management.

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Melissa Di Donato Appointed CEO of SUSE

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    Melissa Di Donato has been appointed CEO of SUSE. From the press release: "Accomplished technology executive and former SAP leader, Melissa Di Donato, has been named chief executive officer of SUSE in a move that will herald the next phase of growth and momentum for the world's largest independent open source software company....Di Donato is highly regarded for her forward-thinking leadership style and is a passionate advocate for workplace diversity. This includes her role as Technology Group chair of the 30% Club—an organization with the goal of achieving 30 percent female directors on S&P 100 boards by 2020. She also holds prominent positions in other organizations, including Notion Capital, and is a trustee for charity Founders4Schools."

  • Melissa Di Donato Appointed CEO of SUSE

    Accomplished technology executive and former SAP leader, Melissa Di Donato, has been named chief executive officer of SUSE® in a move that will herald the next phase of growth and momentum for the world’s largest independent open source software company.
    Di Donato has a proven track record in sales, business operations and leadership focused on high growth and transformation. Prior to SUSE, Di Donato was chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP where she was responsible for the worldwide revenue, profit and customer satisfaction of the company’s digital core solutions. She also held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contributions to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management.

New SUSE CEO: Daring to be different

  • Daring to be different

    It is an incredible honor to join SUSE as the new CEO and to be part of an inspiring group of innovators, challengers and disruptors. As I reflect on the proud history of this great company, I am excited and energized.
    As one of the trailblazing companies to recognize the power of open source, SUSE was first in the 90s to bring Linux to enterprise customers. With each milestone – from launching SUSE Linux Enterprise Server to forming breakthrough alliances with the world’s leading technology vendors – SUSE has remained steadfastly true to its mission of innovation and open source. This company never stopped daring to be different. As I have spoken with customers, users and partners in the community, they have talked about SUSE’s innovative products and passion for open, open source as being the core on which this company has been built. This will continue to drive our success.
    I have Nils to thank for such a strong foundation. Today, SUSE is the world’s largest independent open source software company. We’ve had eight years of continuous growth. We hit record revenues in FY18, and we are now, as an independent company, in a position to accelerate our growth and move at a speed like never before.

TFIR Puff Piece

  • SUSE Gets Its First Female CEO – Melissa Di Donato

    Prior to SUSE, Di Donato was chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP where she was responsible for the worldwide revenue, profit and customer satisfaction of the company’s digital core solutions. She also held senior executive positions at Salesforce and was recognized for her contributions to growing global organizations by winning the 2018 Digital Masters Award for Excellence in Commercial Management.

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols the latest to cover this

SAP and SUSE

  • SUSE Appoints First Female CEO

    SUSE has appointed Melissa Di Donato as the next CEO of the company to succeed, Nils Brauckmann, who will be retiring and leaving SUSE.

    “I am incredibly proud of SUSE’s progress and growth over the last eight years, which has culminated in it securing independent status,” Brauckmann said.

    Prior to SUSE, Di Donato was chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP where she was responsible for the worldwide revenue, profit and customer satisfaction of the company’s digital core solutions.

Quick Change in CEO's at SUSE Linux

  • Quick Change in CEO's at SUSE Linux

    In two weeks, a new chief executive officer will be taking the reins at SUSE, the Germany-based software company best known for its SUSE Linux Enterprise line...

Quick Change in CEOs at SUSE Linux

  • Quick Change in CEOs at SUSE Linux

    The company behind SUSE Linux Enterprise Server and related software suddenly announced a new CEO, just months after becoming independent.

SAP official Di Donato to be next CEO of SUSE

  • SAP official Di Donato to be next CEO of SUSE

    Germany-based open source company SUSE has appointed former SAP official Melissa Di Donato as its chief executive in a move it claims will mark "the next phase of growth and momentum" for the firm.

    A statement from the company said Di Donato had a proven record in sales, business operations and leadership, having been the chief operating officer and chief revenue officer at SAP where she was responsible for global revenue, profit and customer satisfaction.

The Register

  • SUSE taps SAP exec Melissa Di Donato to become open-source biz's first female CEO

    Di Donato replaces Nils Brauckmann, who is scheduled to retire in August, having spent eight years at SUSE, including three in the top job.

    "I am incredibly proud of SUSE's progress and growth over the last eight years, which has culminated in it securing independent status," he said, referring to the $2.5bn deal that saw the company leave the auspices of British software museum MicroFocus, bankrolled by private equity fund EQT.

    "With this chapter of SUSE's corporate development complete, I could not be more pleased to hand off the leadership of SUSE to Melissa."

    SUSE is the world's largest independent open-source software company, primarily known for its distributions of Linux and OpenStack.

    London-based Di Donato spent almost three years as SAP's chief revenue officer, before being promoted to the COO position in July 2018. Before SAP, she worked at Salesfoce, IBM and Oracle. Her CV also includes a stint as managing director of Uccelli, a business consulting firm in London.

    On Twitter, Di Donato describes herself as a mother, wife and drone pilot. In her spare time, she chairs the Technology Group of the 30% Club – an organization with the lofty goal of achieving 30 per cent female representation on S&P 100 boards of directors by 2020.

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