Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PineBook Pro Arm Linux Laptop now up for pre-order for $199.99

Filed under
Linux

Pine64 unveiled a Pinebook Pro laptop prototype at FOSDEM 2019 as an update to the original Allwinner A64 powered Pinebook laptop, but instead of just being a toy to play with, Pinebook Pro aimed to be used as a daily driver thanks to a relatively powerful Rockchip RK3399 processor combined with 4GB RAM, and 64/128GB storage, and equipped with a 14″ Full HD display all for a target price of $200.

Last May, we noticed some good progress on the software development side with a demo showcasing Ubuntu & Debian with MATE desktop, 4K video playback, 3D graphics acceleration, and USB-C video output. The good news is that Pinebook Pro has just launched and can be pre-ordered for $199.99 on Pine64 store. [Update: If you are an existing forum member, you may want to redeem your coupon here]

Read more

Pinebook Pro Lap goes on pre-order for $199 with new twist

  • Pinebook Pro Lap goes on pre-order for $199 with new twist: privacy switches

    Pine64 has opened $199 pre-orders on its open-spec, 14-inch Pinebook Pro laptop, which runs Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 and features 3x privacy switches. The Rock64 Rev 3, PineTab tablet, PinePhone should follow shortly.

    As promised in a July 5 blog announcement, Pine64 has opened pre-orders for $199 on its 14-inch Pinebook Pro laptop, the follow-on to the original 11.6-inch Pinebook. No ship date was listed, and although Pine64 billed the Pinebook Pro as a commercial product compared to the small batch, developer-focused Pinebook, the company warns that the first batch is likely to have some rough edges.

$200 Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro is Available for Pre-order

  • $200 Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro is Available for Pre-order

    Pinebook Pro is an inexpensive Linux laptop with modest configuration and a price tag of just $200. Pre-order for this device is open now.

    Pine64 is a popular name among the single board computer enthusiasts. It gained its fame with its $15 PINE A 64 Raspberry Pi alternative device. Since then it has formed a substantial open source community around its products.

    A couple of years ago, Pine64 launched a low-end Linux laptop called Pinebook. It was basically a single board computer inside a plastic laptop body. The experimental device cost just $89.

    Pine64 has now improved the specification of this inexpensive Linux laptop with the launch of Pinebook Pro.

Pinebook Pro Linux laptop goes up for pre-order for $200

  • Pinebook Pro Linux laptop goes up for pre-order for $200

    What you get for that price is a 2.8 pound laptop with a 14.1 inch full HD display, an Rockchip RK3399 processor, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of eMMC storage (although members of the Pine64 forum who registered early can get a free 128GB upgrade).

New Raspberry Pi laptop rival

  • New Raspberry Pi laptop rival: $200 Linux-based Pinebook Pro available to pre-order

    Pine64, the makers of a popular Raspberry Pi rival, have kicked off pre-orders for a $200 Linux laptop, the Pinebook Pro.

    In an age when smartphone owners are balking at $1,000 price tags on super-powered smartphones, the single-board computer world, championed by the Raspberry Pi, is producing capable machines at the other end of the price spectrum using Arm-based hardware.

    There are Intel-based Windows 10 laptops from the likes of Chuwi that are available for around $200, and plenty of choices when it comes to DIY Raspberry Pi-based laptops.

    But the Pinebook Pro Laptop, which uses the popular Rockchip RK3399, is for fans of different section of the developer board market, those who favor higher-performing devices based on ARM64.

    With the Pinebook Pro, Pine64 has doubled down on the first-generation $99 Pinebook, which featured a quad-core Allwinner A64 system-on-a-chip (SoC), 2GB of RAM, and 16GB of eMMC storage.

New Atlas coverage

Late update

  • You Can Buy the $199 Pinebook Pro Linux Laptop Right Now

    Members of the Pine64 messaging board have been able to buy the 13-inch notebook over the course of the past few weeks. But, as of August 25, the company is widening allocation to “public” pre-orders too.

    No special “coupons” or membership criteria are required; anyone with $199 (plus whatever shipping costs apply) can buy a Pinebook Pro.

    Orders made in the current window are expected to be fulfilled in mid-October. But Pine64 say to not panic if you miss out on the first batch as a second pre-order window will be available in mid-September.

    (Unlike traditional devices which are manufactured and then sold, Pinebook’s are — seemingly — sold and then manufactured in batches).

    Uniquely, the Pinebook Pro is also not sold with a massive markup attached. Pine64 say they sell this device, like its $99 predecessor, virtually at cost.

Pinebook Pro ($199) Linux Laptop Pre-Orders are Available

  • Pinebook Pro ($199) Linux Laptop Pre-Orders are Available to Everyone

    Pine64 was launched Pinebook in April 2017. Pinebook is a lightweight and low cost Linux notebook, which is based on the Pine A64 single board computer and it costs 89 or 99 USD for the 11,6″ and 14″ model respectively.

    It is very lightweight and comes equipped with a full-sized keyboard and large multi-touch trackpad. It runs numerous mainline Linux distributions as well as *BSDs and Android.

Pinebook Pro Linux laptop launches from $199

  • Pinebook Pro Linux laptop launches from $199

    After opening preorders back in July 2019 for the new Pinebook Pro Linux laptop, creator and manufacturer PINE64 has this week started shipping out the new Lenox laptop to customers. Powered by a 64-Bit Dual-Core ARM 1.8GHz Cortex A72 and Quad-Core ARM 1.4GHz Cortex A53 supported by Quad-Core MALI T-860 graphics and 4 GB LPDDR4 Dual Channel System DRAM Memory the Linux laptop is available to purchase priced at $199. Check out the video below for a quick overview of what you can expect from the PINE64 Pinebook Pro Linux laptop.

The Second Window of the Pinebook Pro Pre-Order

  • The Second Window of the Pinebook Pro Pre-Order has been Announced

    The Pinebook Pro is not like other computer manufacturers, they are not stacked in a warehouse for regular sale.

    They are produced in batches based on sales. So don’t miss the sale if you really want to buy it.

    The Pinebook Pro costs $199.99 with additional shipping charges.

    The pre-orders are estimated dispatch in December 2019.

    In some bad cases, don’t worry if you missed it or sold it, the next pre-order window will be available in early 2020.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux-Compatible Devices and Open Hardware

  • Microchip SAMD21 Machine Learning Evaluation Kits Work with Cartesiam, Edge Impulse and Motion Gestures Solutions

    While it all started in the cloud Artificial Intelligence is now moving at the very edge is ultra-low power nodes, and Microchip has launched two SAMD21 Arm Cortex-M0+ machine learning evaluation kits that now work with AI/ML solutions from Cartesiam, Edge Impulse, and Motion Gestures. Bot machine learning evaluation kits come with SAMD21G18 Arm Cortex-M0+ 32-bit MCU, an on-board debugger (nEDBG), an ATECC608A CryptoAuthentication secure element, ATWINC1510 Wi-Fi network controller, as well as Microchip MCP9808 high accuracy temperature sensor and a light sensor. But EV45Y33A development kit is equipped with an add-on board featuring Bosch’s BMI160 low-power Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), while EV18H79A features an add-on board with TDK InvenSense ICM-42688-P 6-axis MEMS.

  • 3µA/MHz Ambiq Apollo 4 MCU Targets Battery-powered IoT Devices with Voice Processing

    Ambiq Micro is using sub-threshold voltages under 0.5V to offer ultra-low-power Arm microcontrollers. In 2015, the company launch the Apollo Cortex-M4F MCU with 30µA/MHz power consumption in active mode, which was followed in 2016 by Apollo 2 in consuming just 10µA/MHz, and Apollo 3 (Blue) dropped power consumption to as low as 6µA/MHz against using a Cortex-M4F @ 48 MHz in active mode.

  • SBC and HMI starter kit run Linux on i.MX6 ULL

    Artila’s “SBC-7530” runs Linux 5.4 on an i.MX6 ULL with WiFi, 2x 10/100 LAN, 3x USB, 2x RS-485, 2x CAN, mini-PCIe with micro-SIM, and an optional starter kit with 7-inch touchscreen. Taiwan-based Artila Electronics, which is known for its Matrix line of low-power, compact IoT gateways, has launched its first SBC in 12 years. The i.MX6 ULL-equipped SBC-7530 follows its circa-2008 M-508 SBC, which is based on an ARM9-based Atmel (now Microchip) AT91RM9200.

  • Industrial panel PC is an IP69 neat freak

    Adlink’s IP69-protected “Titan-AL” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on Apollo Lake and is available with 15.6-, 21.5-, and 23.8-inch HD capacitive touchscreens in either VESA with M12 or pipe-mount configurations. Adlink has added an Intel Apollo Lake based panel PC to its Titan Panel Computer series that adheres to IP69 water and dust-proofing protections. The Titan-AL follows Adlink’s similarly IP69-protected Penta Food-C15/C17/C19 IP69K, which is aimed specifically at food processing operations and runs on an older Atom D2550. Other IP69 protected panel PCs include TechNexion’s i.MX6 based, 10.1-inch TWP-1010-IMX6 and Wincomm’s Skylake-based, 15-, 19-, and 22-inch WTP-9E66.

  • Compact module runs on Ryzen V1000

    Axiomtek’s Linux-ready “CEM130” COM Express Compact Type 6 module provides a Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC with up to 32GB DDR4 and support for quad displays, 2x SATA, 7x PCIe, 9x USB, and -20 to 60°C operation. Axiomtek, which has previously tapped AMD’s Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC in a 3.5-inch CAPA13R SBC and DSP600-211 signage player, has now returned with a COM Express Compact Type 6 module. The CEM130 joins other V1000-equipped, 95 x 95mm Compact Type 6 modules such as Arbor’s EmETXe-a10M0 and Kontron’s COMe-cVR6.

  • New COM Express Type 6 Compact Module Compatible with Windows 10 and Linux Operating Systems
  •        
  • Monitor water quality anywhere in the world with WaterAid

    Clean water is one of our most precious resources, but identifying sources of pollution often means expensive equipment. This can also mean taking multiple water quality readings and somehow aggregating them together to be easily usable. As a solution to both problems, Andrei Florian has developed WaterAid — which was recently named a finalist in this year’s Hackaday Prize. WaterAid consists of a measurement unit that senses water pH, turbidity, and temperature, as well as atmospheric temperature and humidity. Data is relayed to the system’s backend via a cellular connection, using an onboard MKR GSM 1400. Collected information from one or more devices is then displayed on a Soracom Lagoon dashboard for water monitoring from anywhere in the world! Not only can a fleet of WaterAids be used to continuously track a river, lake, or any other body of water, but individuals looking to get immediate feedback on quality can utilize the portable tool’s NeoPixel ring for color-coded judgement.

  •        
  • A MKR ZERO-based volume controller for your PC

    While some keyboards provide media keys or even knobs to adjust your overall computer sound up and down, often what you really want is the ability to tune program volumes separately. To make this extremely easy, SNR Tech Bytes has come up with a beautifully-designed controller, which runs on the MKR ZERO. The device features five encoders to individually tune the master volume, Discord, Chrome, gaming, and Spotify, with the help of software on the PC itself. Encoder button mutes each channel as needed, using NeoPixels below to indicate each status.

  •                
  • How is computing taught in schools around the world?
             
  •      
  • Build an arcade cabinet | Hackspace 35
             
  •      
  •  
    nut – testing shutdown and startup
                     
                       

    Based on this, I’m confident the rack will properly shutdown when the power fails. Just as important, it will come back when the power returns.

Adventures of porting postmarketOS to the Librem 5

I’ve been longing to drop the shackles of Android ever since I made the decision to stop using my Nokia N900. Nokia had given up on Linux phones, and it was clear that there would be no further security patches for my favorite smartphone of all time. Shaking Google out of Android had been my mission for years, and I had resorted to running my own builds of “de-Googled” LineageOS. I was longing for something better. I was out of the country when I first read about postmarketOS (“pmOS”) in May 2017. postmarketOS is a Linux distribution based on Alpine Linux, that strives to provide a Linux distribution running the mainline Linux kernel, as a means to revive old smartphones long forgotten by their manufacturers. My beloved N900 was one device with (rough) support! I quickly jumped on eBay to order a second N900 to meet me at home when I arrived back, because obviously two are needed. Obviously… Thus began my relationship with postmarketOS, one that continues to this day. Things were not all rosy though… After some time it became clear that the older N900 CPU wasn’t going to get any faster for running “modern” applications and that there would never be a free userspace graphics driver for its GPU, so I was quite excited when I first learned about the Librem 5. Sure, it didn’t have a physical slide-out keyboard, but the promise of a device from a company that would treat Linux support as a first-class citizen was too good to pass up. I promptly pre-ordered a developer kit (“devkit”) and phone, with the full intention of porting postmarketOS to the device and eventually using it full time to replace the heaping pile of Android in my pocket. Read more

LibreOffice: Yaru, Promotion and Locale-independent Writer Templates

  • The best LibreOffice extensions. Yaru icon theme

    Paul Kepinski made a new nice LibreOffice icon theme. Its name is Yaru. He wanted include it into LibreOffice source code, but then he made an extension and now you can download it by the link. Just enjoy!

  • Spread the word – add LibreOffice to your email signature!

    Love LibreOffice? Want to let more people know about it? An effective (and easy) way is to add a mention of the software to your email signature. This is the piece of text that’s automatically added to emails that you send, and typically includes some information about your job, or other contact details. Many people also use their email signatures (aka “sigs”) to spread the word about causes they support – such as free and open source software projects. So, you could use your signature to raise awareness about LibreOffice, for instance! When people read your emails, if they also check out the signature, they’ll learn something.

  • Locale-independent Writer templates

    Users create new documents in various ways. When they do so in Online or via Windows Explorer’s context menu (New → …) then actual templates are not involved in the process, technically. What happens instead is that there is a plain empty Writer (or Calc, Impress) document that gets copied. The reason for this is that by the time the document gets created, the WOPI-like protocol or Windows Explorer doesn’t have a running soffice process to create a document instance from a template: it’ll just copy a file.

Screencasts and Audiocasts/Shows

  • Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition overview | #FREE OPERATING SYSTEM.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Manjaro 20.1 XFCE Edition and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #27: Preparing for an Interview With Python Practice Problems

    What is an effective way to prepare for a Python interview? Would you like a set of problems that increase in difficulty to practice and hone your Python skills? This week on the show, we have Jim Anderson to talk about his new Real Python article, “Python Practice Problems: Get Ready for Your Next Interview.” This article provides several problems, which include skeleton code, unit tests, and solutions for you to compare your work. David Amos also joins us this week, and he has brought another batch of PyCoder’s Weekly articles and projects from the Python community. We cover these topics: Structural Pattern Matching, Common Python Data Structures, A Tax Attorney Uses Python, Discover the Role of Python in Space Exploration, and Five Pairs of Magic Methods in Python That You Should Know.

  • Force Students To Run Spyware To Stop Cheating In Online Exams

    Ever since everyone started working remotely more of these online exam proctoring tools and monitoring tools have been popping up and I thought wouldn't it be fun to go and see how they plan to stop cheating and even better how fundamentally flawed this plan actually is. Almost 100% of people who do an online exam will cheat, and cheating should be expected if you don't like that then don't hold an online exam.

  • Normalizing Surveillance

    Doc Searls, Katherine Druckman, and Petros Koutoupis talk about Amazon's Alexa for landlords program. Show notes: 00:00:23 For starters, let's begin with Normalization of Surveillance. 00:50:00 Amazon Alexa for landlords. 00:10:15 Is this really jus another way to discover new markets? 00:19:03 Doc the mechanic?! 00:27:49 If you're young do you really not care about privacy? 00:30:49 A couple of things that will clue people on privacy, are: Health data, and political issues

  • "Hey, DT. You Need A Better Studio!" (Plus Other Comments I Get)

    In this lengthy rant video, I address a few questions and comments that I've been receiving from viewers. I discuss alternatives to the Ubuntu Software Center, alternatives to the term "proprietary garbage", what software you should install alongside your window managers in Arch Linux, VirtualBox versus Virt-Manager, and my recording setup and why I need a proper studio.