Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

PineBook Pro Arm Linux Laptop now up for pre-order for $199.99

Filed under
Linux

Pine64 unveiled a Pinebook Pro laptop prototype at FOSDEM 2019 as an update to the original Allwinner A64 powered Pinebook laptop, but instead of just being a toy to play with, Pinebook Pro aimed to be used as a daily driver thanks to a relatively powerful Rockchip RK3399 processor combined with 4GB RAM, and 64/128GB storage, and equipped with a 14″ Full HD display all for a target price of $200.

Last May, we noticed some good progress on the software development side with a demo showcasing Ubuntu & Debian with MATE desktop, 4K video playback, 3D graphics acceleration, and USB-C video output. The good news is that Pinebook Pro has just launched and can be pre-ordered for $199.99 on Pine64 store. [Update: If you are an existing forum member, you may want to redeem your coupon here]

Read more

Pinebook Pro Lap goes on pre-order for $199 with new twist

  • Pinebook Pro Lap goes on pre-order for $199 with new twist: privacy switches

    Pine64 has opened $199 pre-orders on its open-spec, 14-inch Pinebook Pro laptop, which runs Linux on a Rockchip RK3399 and features 3x privacy switches. The Rock64 Rev 3, PineTab tablet, PinePhone should follow shortly.

    As promised in a July 5 blog announcement, Pine64 has opened pre-orders for $199 on its 14-inch Pinebook Pro laptop, the follow-on to the original 11.6-inch Pinebook. No ship date was listed, and although Pine64 billed the Pinebook Pro as a commercial product compared to the small batch, developer-focused Pinebook, the company warns that the first batch is likely to have some rough edges.

$200 Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro is Available for Pre-order

  • $200 Linux Laptop Pinebook Pro is Available for Pre-order

    Pinebook Pro is an inexpensive Linux laptop with modest configuration and a price tag of just $200. Pre-order for this device is open now.

    Pine64 is a popular name among the single board computer enthusiasts. It gained its fame with its $15 PINE A 64 Raspberry Pi alternative device. Since then it has formed a substantial open source community around its products.

    A couple of years ago, Pine64 launched a low-end Linux laptop called Pinebook. It was basically a single board computer inside a plastic laptop body. The experimental device cost just $89.

    Pine64 has now improved the specification of this inexpensive Linux laptop with the launch of Pinebook Pro.

Pinebook Pro Linux laptop goes up for pre-order for $200

  • Pinebook Pro Linux laptop goes up for pre-order for $200

    What you get for that price is a 2.8 pound laptop with a 14.1 inch full HD display, an Rockchip RK3399 processor, 4GB of RAM, and 64GB of eMMC storage (although members of the Pine64 forum who registered early can get a free 128GB upgrade).

New Raspberry Pi laptop rival

  • New Raspberry Pi laptop rival: $200 Linux-based Pinebook Pro available to pre-order

    Pine64, the makers of a popular Raspberry Pi rival, have kicked off pre-orders for a $200 Linux laptop, the Pinebook Pro.

    In an age when smartphone owners are balking at $1,000 price tags on super-powered smartphones, the single-board computer world, championed by the Raspberry Pi, is producing capable machines at the other end of the price spectrum using Arm-based hardware.

    There are Intel-based Windows 10 laptops from the likes of Chuwi that are available for around $200, and plenty of choices when it comes to DIY Raspberry Pi-based laptops.

    But the Pinebook Pro Laptop, which uses the popular Rockchip RK3399, is for fans of different section of the developer board market, those who favor higher-performing devices based on ARM64.

    With the Pinebook Pro, Pine64 has doubled down on the first-generation $99 Pinebook, which featured a quad-core Allwinner A64 system-on-a-chip (SoC), 2GB of RAM, and 16GB of eMMC storage.

New Atlas coverage

Late update

  • You Can Buy the $199 Pinebook Pro Linux Laptop Right Now

    Members of the Pine64 messaging board have been able to buy the 13-inch notebook over the course of the past few weeks. But, as of August 25, the company is widening allocation to “public” pre-orders too.

    No special “coupons” or membership criteria are required; anyone with $199 (plus whatever shipping costs apply) can buy a Pinebook Pro.

    Orders made in the current window are expected to be fulfilled in mid-October. But Pine64 say to not panic if you miss out on the first batch as a second pre-order window will be available in mid-September.

    (Unlike traditional devices which are manufactured and then sold, Pinebook’s are — seemingly — sold and then manufactured in batches).

    Uniquely, the Pinebook Pro is also not sold with a massive markup attached. Pine64 say they sell this device, like its $99 predecessor, virtually at cost.

Pinebook Pro ($199) Linux Laptop Pre-Orders are Available

  • Pinebook Pro ($199) Linux Laptop Pre-Orders are Available to Everyone

    Pine64 was launched Pinebook in April 2017. Pinebook is a lightweight and low cost Linux notebook, which is based on the Pine A64 single board computer and it costs 89 or 99 USD for the 11,6″ and 14″ model respectively.

    It is very lightweight and comes equipped with a full-sized keyboard and large multi-touch trackpad. It runs numerous mainline Linux distributions as well as *BSDs and Android.

Pinebook Pro Linux laptop launches from $199

  • Pinebook Pro Linux laptop launches from $199

    After opening preorders back in July 2019 for the new Pinebook Pro Linux laptop, creator and manufacturer PINE64 has this week started shipping out the new Lenox laptop to customers. Powered by a 64-Bit Dual-Core ARM 1.8GHz Cortex A72 and Quad-Core ARM 1.4GHz Cortex A53 supported by Quad-Core MALI T-860 graphics and 4 GB LPDDR4 Dual Channel System DRAM Memory the Linux laptop is available to purchase priced at $199. Check out the video below for a quick overview of what you can expect from the PINE64 Pinebook Pro Linux laptop.

The Second Window of the Pinebook Pro Pre-Order

  • The Second Window of the Pinebook Pro Pre-Order has been Announced

    The Pinebook Pro is not like other computer manufacturers, they are not stacked in a warehouse for regular sale.

    They are produced in batches based on sales. So don’t miss the sale if you really want to buy it.

    The Pinebook Pro costs $199.99 with additional shipping charges.

    The pre-orders are estimated dispatch in December 2019.

    In some bad cases, don’t worry if you missed it or sold it, the next pre-order window will be available in early 2020.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines, Snapcraft & Ubuntu, Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix and EndeavourOS

  • apt install arch-linux | LINUX Unplugged 331

    We're myth-busting this week as we take a perfectly functioning production server and switch it to Arch. Is this rolling distro too dangerous to run in production, or can the right approach unlock the perfect server? We try it so you don't have to.

  • 2019-12-10 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft releases Teams for Linux, SiFive enters the education market, the Eclipse Foundation champions open source on edge computing, and xs:code wants to help improve open source funding models.

  • Brunch with Brent: Alan Pope | Jupiter Extras 38

    Brent sits down with Alan Pope (popey), who shares his knack for fuzzy-testing, the beginnings of Ubuntu Podcast, insights into Ubuntu Touch and Unity, the joys and perils of being “Internet Famous”, and how to contribute meaningfully to your favorite Linux distributions. popey is a Developer Advocate at Canonical working on Snapcraft & Ubuntu, co-host of User Error and Ubuntu Podcast.

  • Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 19.10 - First Look

    Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 19.10 is the very first version of a potential new member of the Ubuntu family of Linux distributions.

  • EndeavourOS 2019.12.03 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at EndeavourOS 2019.12.03. Enjoy!

today's howtos

ARM and AMD: GNU/Linux on Board

  • ARM Again in 2019 or 2020

    The assertion that nobody cares about SBSA is rather interesting. Obviously, nobody in the embedded area does. They just fork Linux, clone a bootloader, flash it and ship, and then your refrigerator sends spam and your TV is used to attack your printer, while they move on the next IoT product. But I do care. I want to download Fedora and run it, like I can on x86. Is that too much to ask?

  • EEPD Launches AMD Ryzen Embedded NUC Boards & Mini PCs

Programming: Rust, Haskell, Qt and Python

  • Sonja Heinze: What this blog is about

    In order to ask for an Outreachy grant for a certain open-source project, applicants first have to contribute to that project for about a month. When choosing a project, I didn’t know any Rust. But the fact that Fractal is written in Rust was an important point in favor due to curiosity. But I also expected to have a hard time at the beginning. Fortunately, that wasn’t really the case. For those who haven’t used Rust, let me give two of the reasons why: If you just start coding, the compiler takes you by the hand giving you advice like “You have done X. You can’t do that because of Y. Did you maybe mean to do Z?”. I took those pieces of advice as an opportunity to dig into the rules I had violated. That’s definitely a possible way to get a first grip on Rust. Nevertheless, there are pretty good sources to learn the basics, for example, the Rust Book. Well, to be precise, there’s at least one (sorry, I’m a mathematician, can’t help it, I’ve only started reading that one so far). It’s not short, but it’s very fast to read and easy to understand. In my opinion, the only exception being the topics on lifetimes. But lifetimes can still be understood by other means.

  • Joey Hess: announcing the filepath-bytestring haskell library

    filepath-bytestring is a drop-in replacement for the standard haskell filepath library, that operates on RawFilePath rather than FilePath.

  • Parsing XML with Qt: Updates for Qt 6

    This module provides implementations for two different models for reading and writing XML files: Document Object Model (DOM) and Simple API for XML (SAX). With DOM model the full XML file is loaded in memory and represented as a tree, this allows easy access and manipulation of its nodes. DOM is typically used in applications where you don't care that much about memory. SAX, on the other hand, is an event based XML parser and doesn't load the whole XML document into memory. Instead it generates events for tokens while parsing, and it's up to the user to handle those events. The application has to implement the handler interfaces (fully, or partially by using QXmlDefaultHandler). A lot of people find this inconvenient as it forces them to structure their code around this model. Another problem is that the current implementation of SAX (and as a consequence DOM, since it's implemented using SAX) is not fully compliant with the XML standard. Considering these downsides, Qt does not recommend using SAX anymore, and the decision has been made to deprecate those classes starting from Qt 5.15.

  • pathlib and paths with arbitrary bytes

    The pathlib module was added to the standard library in Python 3.4, and is one of the many nice improvements that Python 3 has gained over the past decade. In three weeks, Python 3.5 will be the oldest version of Python that still receive security patches. This means that the presence of pathlib can soon be taken for granted on all Python installations, and the quest towards replacing os.path can begin for real. In this post I’ll have a look at how pathlib can be used to handle file names with arbitrary bytes, as this is valid on most file systems.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #398 (Dec. 10, 2019)
  • Variables in Python

    If you want to write code that is more complex, then your program will need data that can change as program execution proceeds.

  • Creating an email service for my son’s childhood memories with Python

    This was very flexible as it allowed me to keep anything else I wanted in this document – and it was portable (to anyone who have access to some way of reading Word documents) – and accessible to non-technical people such as my son’s grandparents. After a while though, I wondered if I’d made the right decision: shouldn’t I have put it into some other format that could be accessed programmatically? After all, if I kept doing this for his entire childhood then I’d have a lot of interesting data in there… Well, it turns out that a Word table isn’t too awful a format to store this sort of data in – and you can access it fairly easily from Python. Once I realised this, I worked out what I wanted to create: a service that would email me every morning listing the things I’d put as diary entries for that day in previous years. I was modelling this very much on the Timehop app that does a similar thing with photographs, tweets and so on, so I called it julian_timehop.

  • Executing Shell Commands with Python

    Repetitive tasks are ripe for automation. It is common for developers and system administrators to automate routine tasks like health checks and file backups with shell scripts. However, as those tasks become more complex, shell scripts may become harder to maintain. Fortunately, we can use Python instead of shell scripts for automation. Python provides methods to run shell commands, giving us the same functionality of those shells scripts. Learning how to run shell commands in Python opens the door for us to automate computer tasks in a structured and scalable way. In this article, we will look at the various ways to execute shell commands in Python, and the ideal situation to use each method.