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The VR Linux desktop is on its way

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Linux

Virtual reality (VR) is moving from games to work, but on the Linux desktop it's had a hard row to hoe. While many VR peripherals and head-mounted display (HMD) support Linux, some "supported" games have trouble running on Linux. VR gaming on Linux is getting better. But if you wanted to use a Linux desktop via VR, you were out of luck. Your luck may be turning now with the xrdesktop.

Xrdesktop is an open-source project. It's designed to let you work with traditional desktop environments, such as GNOME and KDE, in VR. It does this by making window managers aware of VR. It then uses VR runtimes to render desktop windows in 3D space. Once there, you'll be able to work on the desktop using VR controllers in place of a mouse and keyboard.

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Valve proposes game-friendly changes to the Linux kernel

  • Valve proposes game-friendly changes to the Linux kernel

    Linux has never been a hot gaming platform. Valve, creator of the Steam game engine and network, has long wanted Linux to replace Windows as the PC gaming platform. Indeed, Gabe Newell, Valve's CEO, once said, "Linux is the future of gaming." That didn't happen, but Valve didn't give up on Linux. Now, Valve is doubling down on Linux, by proposing changes to the Linux kernel to make it more gaming-friendly.

    To give you some background, Newell turned sour on Windows, with the release of Windows 8, declaring, "Windows 8 is a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space." By the next year, Newell said, "Linux is the future of gaming for gamers on the client as well, because, besides Microsoft moving to a more locked-in style of computing . . . Closed systems are at odds with the evolution of gaming."

Valve-backed Xrdesktop Brings Linux Desktop Environments Into VR

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today's leftovers

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