Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security: Small Airplanes, Hutchins, Updates, Windows XP and WireGuard

Filed under
Security
  • US issues hacking security alert for small planes [iophk: as planes become networked, attacks will no longer require physical access, such a thing has happened in cars.]

    The cybersecurity firm, Rapid7, found that an attacker could potentially disrupt electronic messages transmitted across a small plane’s network, for example by attaching a small device to its wiring, that would affect aircraft systems.

    Engine readings, compass data, altitude and other readings “could all be manipulated to provide false measurements to the pilot,” according to the DHS alert.

  • Small Airplanes Can Be Hacked to Display False Data in Flight

    However, the [attack] requires physical access.

    [...]

    Rapid7 verified the findings by investigating two commercially available avionics systems. It determined that only "some level of physical access" to the aircraft's wiring was needed to pull of the hack, which could be delivered by attaching a small device to the plane's Controller Area Network (CAN) bus to send the false commands.

    The key problem is that the CAN bus is integrated into the plane's other components without any firewalls or authentication systems in place. This means untrusted connections over a USB adapter hooked up to the plane can send commands to its electronic systems.

  • No Jail Time for “WannaCry Hero” [iophk: the plea "bargain" still means he has become a convicted felon]

    Hutchins’ conviction means he will no longer be allowed to stay in or visit the United States, although Judge Stadtmeuller reportedly suggested Hutchins should seek a presidential pardon, which would enable him to return and work here.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (389-ds-base, curl, and kernel), Debian (libssh2), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, and oniguruma), openSUSE (chromium, openexr, thunderbird, and virtualbox), Oracle (389-ds-base, curl, httpd, kernel, and libssh2), Red Hat (nss and nspr and ruby:2.5), Scientific Linux (httpd and kernel), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, polkit, and python-requests), and Ubuntu (openjdk-8, openldap, and sox).

  • It's 2019, and one third of businesses still have active Windows XP deployments [Ed: The problem is that they use Windows (back doors in all versions), not that they use "XP". They should move corporate data to something secure like BSD and GNU/Linux.]

    Zero-day attacks were the second-most cited concern among IT decision makers, according to SpiceWorks, with 18% of respondents citing that as their primary concern. Insider data leaks were the most cited, at 27%, while attacks on IoT devices was third (17%), followed by supply-chain attacks (15%), DDoS attacks (15%), and cryptojacking (15%). Fewer than 20% of respondents indicated their business was "completely prepared" for common security threats.

    Considering the risks that accompany unsupported software generally, and the larger attack surface that results from an unsupported (or otherwise unpatched) operating system, there is a relative lack of urgency to migrate from Windows 7. Certainly, while paid support for volume licenses is a possibility for some, smaller organizations ineligible for volume licensing will be left out in the cold. To date, Microsoft has shown no signs of wavering in their intent to grant a reprieve to the remaining users of Windows 7. Without a major shift, or a reprieve from Redmond, the prospect of unpatched, internet-connected systems is fertile ground for botnet creation.

  • NordLynx: NordVPN Builds New Tech Around WireGuard

    Well known Panama-based VPN provider NordVPN has announced their NordLynx technology today that is based on the WireGuard protocol.

    NordLynx is the company's new "fast and secure" VPN solution built atop WireGuard. The company describes WireGuard as a "radical change" and "a breath of fresh air in the industry."

NordVPN brings WireGuard-based NordLynx to Linux users

  • NordVPN brings WireGuard-based NordLynx to Linux users

    NordVPN has announced an important new option for users of the Linux version of its eponymous VPN tool. The company is introducing a new technology called NordLynx which is based on the WireGuard protocol.

    The company says that it successfully combines the highspeed connection offered by WireGuard with NordVPN's own privacy-protecting double NAT system.

Linux Users First In Line For NordVPN’s New WireGuard System

  • Linux Users First In Line For NordVPN’s New WireGuard System

    Do you use NordVPN on Linux? If so, you’re going to be first in line for NordVPN’s brand new technology which is called NordLynx and is based on the relatively new WireGuard protocol.

    The WireGuard protocol will replace the standard OpenVPN protocol, though it will only be available to Linux users at first. Why the change? Simple: WireGuard is outperforming OpenVPN in quite a few key areas (see below). Plus, WireGuard is a mere 4000 lines of code, whereas OpenVPN is comprised of hundreds of thousands. This makes it easier to manage and deploy.

NordVPN Implements WireGuard Protocol on Linux

  • NordVPN Implements WireGuard Protocol on Linux

    NordVPN has released the WireGuard protocol, combining WireGuard’s high-speed connection and NordVPN’s custom double Network Address Translation (NAT) system, protecting the privacy of its users.

NordVPN offers NordLynx for Linux

  • NordVPN offers NordLynx for Linux, built around WireGuard

    Virtual Private Network (VPN) company NordVPN has introduced NordLynx technology built around the WireGuard protocol.

    WireGuard is thought to be shaking up the VPN space as a new type of protocol because of its approach to cryptography and speed — other protocols in this space include OpenVPN and IPSec out of the water.

    According to the WireGuard team, this technology is designed as a general purpose VPN for running on [anything from] embedded interfaces [up to] super computers alike, fit for many different circumstances.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Newest Linux Optimizations Can Achieve 10M IOPS Per-Core With IO_uring - Phoronix

    Just one week ago Linux block subsystem maintainer Jens Axboe was optimizing the kernel to get 8 million IOPS on a single CPU core. He progressed the week hitting around ~8.9M IOPS per-core and began to think he was hitting the hardware limits and running out of possible optimizations. However, this week he is kicking things off by managing to hit 10 million IOPS!

  • Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 Quick overview #Shorts - Invidious

    A Quick overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10.

  • Reset Password On Any Linux Distro (No Root Needed) - Invidious

    Losing your access to your user account on Linux can be really frustrating but luckily resetting that lost password is actually incredibly easy but the process slightly changes depending on the bootloader you're using at least for the easy approach

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 706

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue 706 for the week of October 17 – 23, 2021.

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.43 Thank You

    Oleksandr Kyriukhin has released the 2021.10 version of the Rakudo Compiler, which includes all of the work of the new MoarVM dispatch mechanism. This is the culmination of more than 1.5 year work by many people, but mostly by Jonathan Worthington. A historic step forward that lays the groundwork on more efficient executing of Raku programs, and actually delivers on a number of improvements.

  • Team Profile by KDE's Cornelius Schumacher

    What makes a great team? One important factor is that you have a balanced set of skills and personalities in the team. A team which only consists of leaders won't get much work done. A team which only consists of workers will not work into the right direction. So how can you identify the right balance and combination of people? One answer is the Team Member Profile Test. It's a set of questions which team members answer. They are evaluated to give a result indicating which type of team member the person is and where it lies in the spectrum of possible types.

  • Some users on Reddit report that Windows 11 loses Internet connectivity when trying to connect to NordVPN.
  • Pat Gelsinger's Open-Source Bias, Intel's Pledge To Openness [Ed: Intel is openwashing again, but leaks from Intel show that Intel is a foe, not a a friend. It's also rather ironic that Intel puts an "open" letter in a proprietary site of Microsoft, which is viciously attacking Free software. Intel is a Microsoft booster.]

    Ahead of Intel's inaugural Intel Innovation event taking place virtually later this week, Intel CEO Pat Gelsinger published an open letter to an open ecosystem. In this open ecosystem letter, Gelsinger talks up opennness and choice, adding, "This is why I fundamentally believe in an open source bias, which powers the software-defined infrastructure that transformed the modern data center and ushered in the data-centric era."

Raspberry Pi and Arduino Leftovers

  • Fast Indoor Robot Watches Ceiling Lights, Instead of the Road

    To pull this off, [Andy] uses a camera with a fisheye lens aimed up towards the ceiling, and the video is processed on a Raspberry Pi 3.

  • Tackle The Monkey: Raspberry Pi Gets Round Screen | Hackaday

    You could argue that the project to add a round screen to a Raspberry Pi from [YamS1] isn’t strictly necessary. After all, you could use a square display with a mask around it, giving up some screen real estate for aesthetics. However, you’d still have a square shape around the screen and there’s something eye-catching about a small round screen for a watch, an indicator, or — as in this project — a talking head. The inspiration for the project was a quote from a Google quote about teaching a monkey to recite Shakespeare. A 3D printed monkey with a video head would be hard to do well with a rectangular screen, you have to admit. Possible with a little artistry, we are sure, but the round head effect is hard to beat. Honestly, it looks more like an ape to us, but we aren’t primate experts and we think most people would get the idea.

  • Move! makes burning calories a bit more fun | Arduino Blog

    Gamifying exercise allows people to become more motivated and participate more often in physical activities while also being distracted by doing something fun at the same time. This inspired a team of students from the Handong Global University in Pohang, South Korea to come up with a system, dubbed “Move!,” that uses a microcontroller to detect various gestures and perform certain actions in mobile games accordingly. They started by collecting many different gesture samples from a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which is worn by a person on their wrist. This data was then used to train a TensorFlow Lite model that classifies the gesture and sends it via Bluetooth to the host phone running the app. Currently, the team’s mobile app contains three games that a player can choose from.

Security Leftovers

today's howtos

  • How To Install Cinnamon on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Cinnamon on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, Cinnamon is the default desktop environment of the Linux Mint distribution which offers advanced features and a traditional user experience. Cinnamon is also available as an optional desktop for other Linux distributions like Ubuntu, Fedora, Arch Linux, OpenSUSE, etc. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Cinnamon desktop environment on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • Run Nexus Repository Behind Nginx Reverse Proxy - kifarunix.com

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to run Nexus repository behind Nginx reverse proxy. Nginx can be configure to proxy HTTP requests. In this setup, Nginx receives requests and passes it onto specified proxied server, fetches the response, and sends it back to the client.

  • Linux Foundation to introduce new DevOps Bootcamp
  • SUSE documentation survey 2021 – some results
  • How to install Friday Night Funkin: Neo on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Friday Night Funkin: Neo on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to use the Buttercup password manager on Linux

    Buttercup is an advanced, open-source password vault. It encrypts your passwords with AES 256bit cryptography to keep them safe. If you’re tired of proprietary password solutions on Linux and want something open-source, you’ll love this guide. In this tutorial, we’ll go over how to install Buttercup on Linux. We’ll also show you how to set up your password vault and generate a secure password. Note: Buttercup is also available for iOS and Android in their respective app stores.

  • How to use YouTube Music on the Linux desktop

    YouTube Music is an excellent service. But, sadly, there is no official client for Linux users to enjoy the service. Thankfully, the community has taken it upon itself to create an unofficial YouTube Music app. Here’s how to use it on your system.

  • How to use the AuthPass password manager on Linux

    AuthPass is an open-source password manager for Android, iOS, Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. It is secure and a great way to save your passwords and sensitive information. In this guide, we’ll show you how to set up AuthPass on Linux and how to use it too.

  • How to install Zoom on Elementary OS 6.0 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install Zoom on Elementary OS 6.0.

  • How to Install and Configure RabbitMQ on Debian 11

    RabbitMQ is a free, open-source and one of the most popular message broker software. It supports multiple messaging protocols and uses plugins to communicate with popular messaging solutions like MQTT. A message broker is an application that stores messages for an application. Whenever an application wants to send data to another application, the app publishes the message onto the message broker. RabbitMQ can be deployed in distributed configurations to meet high-scale, high-availability requirements. In this post, we will show you how to install and configure RabbitMQ message broker software on Debian 11.

  • How to Create an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) and use it on AWS

    An Amazon Machine Image (AMI) provides the information required to launch an instance. An EC2 instance can not be launched without an AMI. We can create as many instances as we want from a single AMI when we need multiple instances with the same configuration. To create an instance we can use readily available AMI or we can create our own AMI. To create a custom AMI we need to first launch an instance using one of the available AMIs, make the required configuration on the instance and then use that instance to create an AMI. Instances launched from this new custom AMI include the customizations that we made when we created the AMI. We can create AMIs from either running or stopped instances. Once we create an AMI, we can either keep it private so that only we can use it, or we can share it with a specified list of AWS accounts. We can also make our custom AMI public so that the community can use it.