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Linux: Systemd, Graphics and Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd 243 RC1 Brings Its PStore Service, Zen2/RdRand Workaround & More

    Lennart Poettering has made available the first release candidate of the upcoming systemd 243 update. Systemd 243 is a big one in seeing more than 1,700 commits since the April release of systemd 242. 

  • Radeon RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support For Compute Shaders

    Thanks to Valve's open-source driver developer Samuel Pitoiset, there is now experimental support for using Wave32 support on Navi graphics cards for compute shaders. 

    Navi/RDNA brings support for single-cycle issue Wave32 execution as an alternative to Wave64 for better efficiency. Just over a week ago the initial patches landed adding Wave32 support to RadeonSI for their OpenGL driver while now Samuel has tackled the initial implementation in the RADV driver. 

  • Mining Monero Cryptocurrency On The Open-Source POWER9 Raptor Blackbird

    Unlike my POWER8 server, the Blackbird cannot measure its own system power consumption (only the processor's), so I used a simple watt meter to take measurements. When off, with just the BMC on, the system took so little power my meter could not measure it. It kept showing 0 W, so presumably it's under a Watt. At idle, 55 W.

    [...]

    For each SMT mode, I tried six thread options. The SMT scaling is as expected, at SMT1 there are eight threads, and performance drops after; at SMT2 16 threads, and a corresponding drop after. The "more resources for each thread" effect is also slightly visible, with SMT1 having the highest result at eight mining threads.
    In SMT4, the efficiency scaling is quite nice, showing that a mere eight-core is not even close to the bottleneck here.

More in Tux Machines

Trump's Social Media Platform and the Affero General Public License (of Mastodon)

Trump's Group has 30 days to remedy the violation, or their rights in the software are permanently terminated In 2002, we used phrases like “Web 2.0” and “AJAX” to describe the revolution that was happening in web technology for average consumers. This was just before names like Twitter and Facebook became famous worldwide. Web 2.0 was the groundwork infrastructure of the “social media” to come. As software policy folks, my colleagues and I knew that these technologies were catalysts for change. Software applications, traditionally purchased on media and installed explicitly, were now implicitly installed through web browsers — delivered automatically, or even sometimes run on the user's behalf on someone else's computer. As copyleft activists specifically, we knew that copyleft licensing would have to adjust, too. Read more

Videos: Getting Rid of Microsoft and Linux from Scratch

Kontron takes Raspberry Pi into Industry 4.0 with Codesys

“The integrated development environment Codesys for programmable logic controllers according to the IEC 61131-3 standards is hardware-independent software for application development in industrial automation,” according to Kontron. “Thanks to its open interfaces and security features, Codesys has distinguished itself as an industry 4.0 platform and facilitates data exchange between IIoT networks.” Prior to this, Codesys has been available for Kontron’s PiXtend – a similar product that takes a standard Pi rather than a Compute Module. Of this, the company said: Codesys V3 lets you memory-program controls. An integrated web visualisation tool is available for displaying your control elements, diagrams and graphics on your smartphone, tablet or PC.” Read more

Security: Windows, Microsoft Malware, GPS Bug, and Some Exaggeration/FUD

  • Sophisticated Spearphishing Campaign Targets Government Organizations, IGOs, and NGOs - blackMORE Ops

    The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are engaged in addressing a spearphishing campaign targeting government organizations, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A sophisticated cyber threat actor leveraged a compromised end-user account from Constant Contact, a legitimate email marketing software company, to spoof a U.S.-based government organization and distribute links to malicious URLs.[1] CISA and FBI have not determined that any individual accounts have been specifically targeted by this campaign.

  • Malicious NPM Packages Caught Running Cryptominer On Windows, Linux, macOS Devices [Ed: Lousy anti-journalist sites try to blame the victims for having received malware from Microsoft itself]

    Three JavaScript libraries uploaded to the official NPM package repository have been unmasked as crypto-mining malware, once again demonstrating how open-source software package repositories are becoming a lucrative target for executing an array of attacks on Windows, macOS, and Linux systems.

  • GPS Daemon (GPSD) Rollover Bug

    Critical Infrastructure (CI) owners and operators, and other users who obtain Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) from Global Positioning System (GPS) devices, should be aware of a GPS Daemon (GPSD) bug in GPSD versions 3.20 (released December 31, 2019) through 3.22 (released January 8, 2021).

  • New Linux kernel memory corruption bug causes full system compromise [Ed: This is "local privilege escalation", i.e. vastly less severe than all those back doors in Windows, but so-called 'security' firms aren't meant to talk about state-mandated holes]

    Researchers dubbed it a “straightforward Linux kernel locking bug” that they exploited against Debian Buster’s 4.19.0.13-amd64 kernel.