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IBM: OpenPOWER Foundation, Savings and the OpenStack Platform

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Red Hat
Hardware
  • OpenPOWER Foundation | The Next Step in the OpenPOWER Foundation Journey

    Today marks one of the most important days in the life of the OpenPOWER Foundation. With IBM announcing new contributions to the open source community including the POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and key hardware reference designs at OpenPOWER Summit North America 2019, the future has never looked brighter for the POWER architecture.

    OpenPOWER Foundation Aligns with Linux Foundation

    The OpenPOWER Foundation will now join projects and organizations like OpenBMC, CHIPS Alliance, OpenHPC and so many others within the Linux Foundation. The Linux Foundation is the premier open source group, and we’re excited to be working more closely with them.

    Since our founding in 2013, IEEE-ISTO has been our home, and we owe so much to its team. It’s as a result of IEEE-ISTO’s support and guidance that we’ve been able to expand to more than 350 members and that we’re ready to take the next step in our evolution. On behalf of our membership, our board of directors and myself, we place on record our thanks to the IEEE-ISTO team.

    By moving the POWER ISA under an open model – guided by the OpenPOWER Foundation within the Linux Foundation – and making it available to the growing open technical commons, we’ll enable innovation in the open hardware and software space to grow at an accelerated pace. The possibilities for what organizations and individuals will be able to develop on POWER through its mature ISA and software ecosystem will be nearly limitless.

  • How Red Hat delivers $7B in customer savings

    This spring, Red Hat commissioned IDC to conduct a new study to analyze the contributions of Red Hat Enterprise Linux to the global business economy. While many of the findings were impressive, including immense opportunities for partners, we were especially excited to learn more about how our customers benefit from Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

    According to the study, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform "touches" more than $10 trillion of business revenues worldwide each year and provides economic benefits of more than $1 trillion each year to customers. Nearly $7 billion of that number comes in the form of IT savings. Even more exciting? As hybrid cloud adoption grows, we expect customers to continue to benefit given the importance of a common, flexible and open operating system to IT deployments that span the many footprints of enterprise computing.

  • The road ahead for the Red Hat OpenStack Platform

    If you didn't have a chance to attend our Road Ahead session at Red Hat Summit 2019 (or you did, but want a refresher) you'll want to read on for a quick update. We'll cover where Red Hat OpenStack Platform is today, where we're planning to go tomorrow, and the longer-term plan for Red Hat OpenStack Platform support all the way to 2025.

    A strategic part of our portfolio

    Red Hat OpenStack Platform is a strategic part of Red Hat's vision for open hybrid cloud. It's the on-prem foundation that can help organizations bridge the gap between today's existing workloads and emerging workloads. In fact, it just earned the 2019 CODiE award for "Best Software Defined Infrastructure."

    One of those emerging workloads, and more on the rest in a moment, is Red Hat OpenShift.

POWER ISA Contributed To Open-Source, OpenPOWER Joining The LF

  • POWER ISA Contributed To Open-Source, OpenPOWER Joining The Linux Foundation

    The POWER ISA is being moved to an open model and with IBM contributing a POWER ISA license to the OpenPOWER Foundation, technically anyone can implement on top of it royalty-free and with patent rights. This comes following the success of the royalty-free RISC-V and even the MIPS processor ISA being open-sourced.

IBM is moving OpenPower Foundation to The Linux Foundation

  • IBM is moving OpenPower Foundation to The Linux Foundation

    IBM makes the Power Series chips, and as part of that has open sourced some of the underlying technologies to encourage wider use of these chips. The open source pieces have been part of the OpenPower Foundation. Today, the company announced it was moving the foundation under The Linux Foundation, and while it was at it, announced it was open sourcing several other important bits.

    Ken King, general manager for OpenPower at IBM, says that at this point in his organization’s evolution, they wanted to move it under the auspices of the Linux Foundation . “We are taking the OpenPower Foundation, and we are putting it as an entity or project underneath The Linux Foundation with the mindset that we are now bringing more of an open governance approach and open governance principles to the foundation,” King told TechCrunch.

    But IBM didn’t stop there. It also announced that it was open sourcing some of the technical underpinnings of the Power Series chip to make it easier for developers and engineers to build on top of the technology. Perhaps most importantly, the company is open sourcing the Power Instruction Set Architecture (ISA). These are “the definitions developers use for ensuring hardware and software work together on Power,” the company explained.

Automotive Grade Linux update clusters up

  • Automotive Grade Linux update clusters up — and IBM’s OpenPower opens up

    The Linux Foundation’s AGL released UCB 8.0 with new improved profiles for telematics and instrument cluster and launched an Instrument Cluster Expert Group. The LF also gobbled up IBM’s OpenPower Foundation as IBM unveiled a royalty-free Power ISA.

    Prior to today’s Embedded Linux Conference and Open Source Summit, the Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) group announced Unified Code Base 8.0, which pushes the AGL spec deeper into telematics and instrument clusters. Also at the San Diego event, the Linux Foundation announced it was converting the IBM-backed OpenPower Foundation into a new LF working group. IBM also announced that it was open sourcing the Power CPU ISA (see farther below).

IBM Adds OpenPOWER ISA to Linux Foundation Ecosystem

  • IBM Adds OpenPOWER ISA to Linux Foundation Ecosystem

    The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, recently announced that it will now host the OpenPOWER Foundation project. The project includes IBM’s open POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and contributed Source Design Implementations required to support data-driven hardware for intensive workloads like Artificial Intelligence (AI).

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