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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • Animating Ptolemy’s Equant with Python, SVG, and CSS

    You will recall my previous blog post that tried to build the necessary scaffolding for me to finally write up my 2017 PyCon Ireland keynote on the structure of the Medieval universe. It ran into several problems with matplotlib animations — but, having written that post, I realized that the problem ran deeper.

    How could any animation show a Solar System, when a Solar System’s motion never exactly repeats? The orbital periods of the planets aren’t exact multiples of each other, and don’t provide a moment when the planets reach their original positions and the animation can start over again. At whatever moment an animation finished and looped back to the beginning, the planets would visibly and jarringly jump back to their original position.

  • Train your own spell corrector with TextBlob

    TextBlob is a wonderful Python library it. It wraps nltk with a really pleasant API. Out of the box, you get a spell-corrector.

  • How To Learn Any Programming Language Online in 2019

    Let’s face it, computers are everywhere these days, and the need for programmers is ever-increasing. Programming is vital to make computers be able to help us solve our everyday problems. It’s also a means to increase their speed and usability. With this in mind, it’s high time you jumped on this bandwagon and learned a language yourself!

    However, picking out the most appropriate programming language to learn is a substantial task for beginners. A good approach to making this choice is to consider the most popular programming languages, which languages are easy-to-learn, and how easy it is to find a job for beginners in these languages.

  • How to Build a Custom Anaconda Installer for R

    A frequent question on the Anaconda Community mailing list is how to package R with conda for distribution. Depending on the use case, one option may be to use conda to move environments. This requires that conda has been previously installed on the system. Another option is conda constructor, a utility for packaging a complete conda installation with Python and R packages.

    Constructor is the same utility we use to build Anaconda Distribution and Miniconda installers. It’s a multi-platform installer which means you can build an installer for Windows, Linux and macOS. It also supports a number of options to control how the installer is built. These options are documented on the GitHub constructor repository.

  • Digging into regressions

    Whenever a patch is landed on autoland, it will run many builds and tests to make sure there are no regressions. Unfortunately many times we find a regression and 99% of the time backout the changes so they can be fixed. This work is done by the Sheriff team at Mozilla- they monitor the trees and when something is wrong, they work to fix it (sometimes by a quick fix, usually by a backout). A quick fact, there were 1228 regressions in H1 (January-June) 2019.

    My goal in writing is not to recommend change, but instead to start conversations and figure out what data we should be collecting in order to have data driven discussions. Only then would I expect that recommendations for changes would come forth.

  • “Sudo Mastery” and the new Tilted Windmill Press clothing line

    Sudo Mastery, 2nd edition, is now complete. I’m doing the release slightly different this time, however.

  • Fossil Versus Git

    The feature sets of Fossil and Git overlap in many ways. Both are distributed version control systems which store a tree of check-in objects to a local repository clone. In both systems, the local clone starts out as a full copy of the remote parent. New content gets added to the local clone and then later optionally pushed up to the remote, and changes to the remote can be pulled down to the local clone at will. Both systems offer diffing, patching, branching, merging, cherry-picking, bisecting, private branches, a stash, etc.

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more