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Need A Good Linux Hex Editor? 20 Linux Hex Viewers & Editors Reviewed

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GNU
Linux
Software

A hex editor is a computer program used for editing a binary file that contains machine-readable data. It paves the way of manipulating raw binary data for a particular application. “Hex” is the short form of hexadecimal, a numerical standard format that represents the binary program. A regular hex editor has three specific areas such as ‘character area’ on the right, ‘hexadecimal area’ in the middle and the ‘address area’ on the left. Additionally, some hex editors are designed to edit and parse sector data from the hard disk and floppy disk which are frequently called disk editor or sector editor. There are far ranges of Linux hex editor available in the market; that to a greater extent make a user squarely beneficial, and allow them to edit binary program.

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Also: Announcing lymworkbook project

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • AuriStor breathes life into Andrew File System – Blocks and Files [Ed: Financial ripoff; AuriStorFS is also limited to an operating system with NSA back doors so it's money down the sewer.]

    Andrew File System developer AuriStor updated attendees at an IT Press Tour briefing about its work on the file system with an HPC and large enterprise customer base dating back 16 or more years. AuriStorFS (a modern, licensed version of AFS) is a networked file system providing local access to files in a global namespace that has claimed higher performance, security and data integrity than public cloud-based file-sharing offerings such as Nasuni and Panzura. AuriStor is a small and distributed organisation dedicated to expanding the popularity and cross-platform use of AuriStorFS.

  • India says not to preorder Starlink until it obtains a license

    “Public is advised not to subscribe to Starlink services being advertised,” a tweet from India’s Department of Telecommunications (DoT) reads. The DoT also says it asked Starlink to refrain from “booking / rendering the satellite internet services in India.” In other words, Starlink will have to put preorders on hold until it can get approval from the Indian government.

  • India tells public to shun Musk-backed Starlink until it gets licence

    A government statement issued late on Friday said Starlink had been told to comply with regulations and refrain from "booking/rendering the satellite internet services in India with immediate effect".

  • GitHub is back online after a two-hour outage

    Microsoft-owned GitHub experienced a more than two-hour long outage today, affecting thousands or potentially millions of developers that rely on its many services. GitHub started experiencing issues at around 3:45PM ET, with Git operations, API requests, GitHub actions, packages, pages, and pull requests all affected.

  • Insurers run from ransomware cover as losses mount

    Faced with increased demand, major European and U.S. insurers and syndicates operating in the Lloyd's of London market have been able to charge higher premium rates to cover ransoms, the repair of hacked networks, business interruption losses and even PR fees to mend reputational damage.

    But the increase in ransomware attacks and the growing sophistication of attackers have made insurers wary. Insurers say some attackers may even check whether potential victims have policies that would make them more likely to pay out.

  • Apple Grants Repair Indulgence for iPhones

    Save your huzzahs and whatever you do, do not pop the champagne. Apple did not just ‘cave’ to the right to repair movement, and the fight for an actual, legal right to repair is more important now than ever.

    The occasion for this reminder is, of course, the little-‘m’ momentous announcement by Apple this morning that it would make “Apple parts, tools, and manuals” available to “individual consumers” for self repair — starting with the iPhone 12 and iPhone 13.”

  • Montana high school hit by ransomware

    From their listing, Avos Locker is clearly aware that this is a tiny school district with only a few hundred students and less than two dozen teachers. And yet they are trying to ransom them. Avos writes: “If they refuse to negotiate, we will leak all the data we’ve got.”

  • Apple alerts journalists, activists about state-sponsored [cracking] attempts after NSO Group suit

    On the same day Apple announced a lawsuit against Israeli spyware vendor NSO Group for developing [cracking] tools to help breach iOS technology, the company was notifying potential targets of those exploits.

    El Faro, a news organization in San Salvador, El Salvador, reported late Tuesday that 12 of its staff members received notices from the company, which warned that that “Apple believes you are being targeted by state-sponsored attackers who are trying to remotely compromise the iPhone associated with your Apple ID.” The company also sent notices to four others in San Salvador who are “leaders of Civil Society organizations and opposition political parties,” the news organization reported.

  • Run a website off a Google Sheets Database, with Hugo

    Here’s how I built a website, Profilerpedia, using a Google Sheet as the backing database.

    Profilerpedia aims to map the profiling ecosystem and connect software with profilers and profilers with great analysis UIs, so we can make code faster and more efficient. More on Profilerpedia in the announcement post.

    It’s interesting to explain the architecture, because it challenges some engineering dogmas, like “a spreadsheet isn’t a good database”. I think running your site from a spreadsheet is a very reasonable pattern for many sites.

    The resulting architecture is my third or fourth attempt at this; I learned a lot along the way, I’m pretty happy with the result, and I want to share what I learned.

  • Boeing Missteps on 737 MAX Went Beyond Deadly Crashes That Killed 346, new Book Reveals

    When the first Boeing 737 MAX plane came off the production line in December 2015, it was the beginning of a highly anticipated new line of aircraft for the storied company. It incorporated the latest technology and was billed by Boeing as "deliver[ing] the highest efficiency, reliability and passenger comfort in the single-aisle market." Tragically, that promise came to a glaring halt with two back-to-back disasters in which flight control software known as the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) incorrectly gauged the aircrafts' angles of ascent and prevented the pilots from manually overriding it. In total, 346 people on board Lion Air flight 610 on October 28, 2018 and Ethiopian Air flight 302 on March 10, 2019 were killed after only about 13 minutes and 6 minutes in the air, respectively.

Security Leftovers

  • New Side-Channel Vulnerability in the Linux Kernel Enabling DNS Cache Poisoning

    A recent research paper by a team at University of California, Riverside, shows the existence of previously overlooked side channels in the Linux kernels that can be exploited to attack DNS servers. According to the researchers, the issue with DNS roots in its design, that never really took security as a key concern and that made it extremely hard to retrofit strong security features into it.

  • Reproducible Builds (diffoscope): diffoscope 194 released

    The diffoscope maintainers are pleased to announce the release of diffoscope version 194. This version includes the following changes:

    [ Chris Lamb ]
    * Don't traceback when comparing nested directories with non-directories.
      (Closes: reproducible-builds/diffoscope#288)
    
  • Thousands of printers at risk of denial of service attacks

    Researchers have highlighted a trio of potential attacks against printers that could allow denial of service, information theft, or botnet compromise. The collection of attacks, labeled Printjack, appeared in a paper from researchers Giampaolo Bella and Pietro Biondi at the Universit`a di Catania and Istituto di Informatica e Telematica in Italy.

  • GoDaddy says information on 1.2 million customers exposed in data breach

    In a document filed to the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, GoDaddy noted that the company had discovered its Managed WordPress hosting environment had been compromised by an “unauthorized third party,” resulting in emails and customers numbers of 1.2 million Managed WordPress users being exposed.

Fedora 35 Mini-Review On The Blackbird And TALOS II

My conclusion is damning with faint praise: at least it wasn't any worse. And with these tweaks it works fine. If you're on F34 you have no reason not to upgrade, and if you're on F33 you won't have much longer until you have to (and you might as well just jump right to F35 at that point). But it's still carrying an odd number of regressions (even though, or perhaps despite the fact, the workarounds for F35 are the same as F34) and the installation on the T2 was bumpier than the Blackbird for reasons that remain unclear to me. If you run KDE or Xfce or anything other than GNOME, you shouldn't have any problems, but if you still use GNOME as your desktop environment you should be prepared to do more preparatory work to get it off the ground. I have higher hopes for F36 because we may finally get that float128 update that still wrecks a small but notable selection of packages like MAME, but I also hope that some of these regressions get dealt with as well because that would make these updates a bit more liveable. Any system upgrade of any OS will make you wonder what's going to break this time, but the most recent Fedora updates have come off as more fraught with peril than they ought to be. Read more

Cross-platform package building: Pkgsrc vs. Ravenports (1/2)

This is the first of a two articles on cross-platform package management / package building. It covers the basics by discussing why it is actually surprisingly (to many people) difficult to do and what some of the problems are. It also takes a quick look at some strategies to solve the problem.

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