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Ubuntu: Ubuntu 19.10 to Boot Faster, Machine Learning, Snapcraft Snap on Windows

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  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Boot Faster Thanks To LZ4 Compression

    Ubuntu's kernel team has decided to switch to LZ4 kernel image compression beginning with Ubuntu 19.10 in order to speed-up the boot times.

    After evaluating the different compression options for the kernel image, the Ubuntu developers decided to make use of LZ4 on supported architectures for the kernel image and initramfs. Even with slower rotational storage, the much faster decompression times of LZ4 should yield benefit.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Will Boot Faster Thanks to LZ4 Compression

    Ubuntu 19.10 boot times from installation media will be faster thanks to the use of LZ4 decompression for kernel and initramfs.

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    Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning adoption in the enterprise is exploding from Silicon Valley to Wall Street with diverse use cases ranging from the analysis of customer behaviour and purchase cycles to diagnosing medical conditions.

    Following on from our webinar ‘Getting started with AI’, this webinar will dive into what success looks like when deploying machine learning models, including training, at scale.

  • Ubuntu's Snapcraft Snap Creator Tool Will Soon Get a Windows Installer

Colin King: Boot speed improvements for Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

  • Colin King: Boot speed improvements for Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

    The early boot requires loading and decompressing the kernel and initramfs from the boot storage device. This speed is dependent on several factors, speed of loading an image from the boot device, the CPU and memory/cache speed for decompression and the compression type.

    Generally speaking, the smallest (best) compression takes longer to decompress due to the extra complexity in the compression algorithm. Thus we have a trade-off between load time vs decompression time.

    For slow rotational media (such as a 5400 RPM HDD) with a slow CPU the loading time can be the dominant factor. For faster devices (such as a SSD) with a slow CPU, decompression time may be the dominate factor. For devices with fast 7200-10000 RPM HDDs with fast CPUs, the time to seek to the data starts to dominate the load time, so load times for different compressed kernel sizes is only slightly different in load time.

    The Ubuntu kernel team ran several experiments benchmarking several x86 configurations using the x86 TSC (Time Stamp Counter) to measure kernel load and decompression time for 6 different compression types: BZIP2, GZIP, LZ4, LZMA, LZMO and XZ. BZIP2, LZMA and XZ are slow to decompress so they got ruled out very quickly from further tests.

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