Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Exim patches a major security bug found in all versions that left millions of Exim servers vulnerable to security attacks [Ed: If only we saw similar headlines about Microsoft Windows each time a hole was found in Photoshop...]

    A vulnerability was found in all the versions of Exim, a mail transfer agent (MTA), that when exploited can let attackers run malicious code with root privileges.

  • KeePass Password Safe 2.43

    KeePass is a free open source password manager, which helps you to manage your passwords in a secure way. You can put all your passwords in one database, which is locked with one master key or a key file. So you only have to remember one single master password or select the key file to unlock the whole database. The databases are encrypted using the best and most secure encryption algorithms currently known (AES and Twofish).

    KeePass is really free, and more than that: it is open source (OSI certified). You can have a look at its full source and check whether the encryption algorithms are implemented correctly.

  • Live Patching Case Study of GESIS

    You can save time and resources by using Live Patching. GESIS is one of the many organizations who achieved excellent results using SUSE Linux Enterprise Live Patching. Here we outline some of those results so you can make an assessment about how these can apply to your environment.

  • Linux Kernel flexcop_usb_probe Function NULL Pointer Dereference Vulnerability [CVE-2019-15291]

    A vulnerability in the Linux Kernel could allow a local attacker to cause a denial of service (DoS) condition on a targeted system.

    The vulnerability is due to a NULL pointer dereference condition that exists in the flexcop_usb_probe function, as defined in the drivers/media/usb/b2c2/flexcop-usb.c source code file of the affected software.

    An attacker with physical access to a targeted system could exploit this vulnerability by inserting a USB device that submits malicious input to the targeted system. A successful exploit could cause a DoS condition on the system.

  • Here's How Vivaldi for Android Protects Your Privacy and Keeps Your Data Secure

    After announcing the Vivaldi for Android mobile web browser, Vivaldi Technologies shared with us some details on how they managed to build a secure and privacy-aware browser on Android.
    We all know that Google's Android mobile operating system ships with a built-in web browser core, which is based on the same code that Google Chrome was built it. This internal browser core lets users view basic web pages when setting up their Android device for the first time.

    Once the device is all set up, most probably the user has installed his favorite web browser app from the Play store. This is where Vivaldi for Android comes to fill the gap, as it's not using Android's built-in browser core, which makes it secure and privacy-aware.

More in Tux Machines

AMD EPYC 7642 Benchmarks: The Rome 48 Core CPU That Easily Takes On Intel's Xeon Platinum 8280

Since the AMD EPYC 7002 series "Rome" launch at the beginning of August, it's been known how AMD's top-end (aside from the newly-announced EPYC 7H12) EPYC 7742 easily outperforms the Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 in most real-world benchmarks. The EPYC 7742 not only outperforms the Xeon Platinum 8280 in raw performance but also at a significantly lower cost and it gets even better with the EPYC 7642. We have been testing the EPYC 7642 48-core processors and even there the performance is generally ahead of a Xeon Platinum 8280 while being about half the cost of that flagship non-AP Intel Xeon Scalable Cascadelake processor. Complementing our recent EPYC 7302 and EPYC 7402 benchmarks, today we are focused on the EPYC 7642 as the Rome 48-core / 96-thread processor. This 48 core processor has a 2.3GHz base clock and 3.3GHz boost clock while having 256MB of L3 cache, eight DDR4-3200 memory channels, 128 PCIe 4.0 lanes, and other features in common with the EPYC 7742 and other Rome processors. The EPYC 7642 carries a 50MHz base clock speed advantage over the 64 core EPYC 7742 but a 100MHz lower boost clock speed as the principal differences aside from the core/thread count. Both of these CPUs carry a 225 Watt TDP. Read more

Plasma 5.16.90 (Plasma 5.17 Beta) Available for Testing

Are you using Kubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo, our current Stable release? Or are you already running our development builds of the upcoming 19.10 Eoan Ermine? We currently have Plasma 5.16.90 (Plasma 5.17 Beta) available in our Beta PPA for Kubuntu 19.04 and 19.10. This is a Beta Plasma release, so testers should be aware that bugs and issues may exist. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 getting hot? A closer look

I hope that will all arrive in time for me to try it out over the weekend, so I can pass along some more information about temperatures, and about what pieces fit together in which cases, if any. Finally, the Raspberry Pi Foundation says that they are working on several software and firmware changes that should help bring the temperature of the Pi 4 down. Hopefully those will be released soon - but even if they are, I don't expect that they will improve the situation by more than 5 degrees or so, and given how hot the Pi 4 runs, that is not enough to eliminate the need for the kind of hardware measures I am looking at now. Read more

Top Open Source Video Players for Linux

You can watch Hulu, Prime Video and/or Netflix on Linux. You can also download videos from YouTube and watch them later or if you are in a country where you cannot get Netflix and other streaming services, you may have to rely on torrent services like Popcorn Time in Linux. Watching movies/TV series or other video contents on computers is not an ‘ancient tradition’ yet. Usually, you go with the default video player that comes baked in with your Linux distribution (that could be anything). You won’t have an issue utilizing the default player – however, if you specifically want more open-source video player choices (or alternatives to the default one), you should keep reading. Read more