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Davidlohr Bueso: Linux v5.2: Performance Goodies

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Linux

This applies the idea that in most cases, a rwsem will be uncontended (single threaded). For example, experimentation showed that page fault paths really expect this. The change itself makes the code basically not read in a cacheline in a tight loop over and over. Note however that this can be a double edged sword, as microbenchmarks have show performance deterioration upon high amounts of tasks, albeit mainly pathological workloads.

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