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10 Best Free Linux GPS Tools

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Linux

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation satellite system consisting of a network of satellites which provide positioning, navigation, and timing services in all weather, anywhere on or near the Earth.

The United States government maintains the system without levying any subscription fees or other charges.

Use of space-borne positioning and timing data is now commonplace, in everything from freight movement to synchronization of computer networks. Cellular and data networks, shipping and air transport, financial systems, railways, agriculture, and the emergency services all make frequent use of GPS. There are also many different recreational uses of GPS. The one that first springs to mind is for tracking in motor vehicles. GPS helps drivers find the best route to a specified location, summon help in the event of an emergency, plot the location of the vehicle on a map, or find the nearest bank.

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Python Programming

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Screencasts/Audiocasts/Shows: elementary OS, Zorin OS, Emacs, Vim and Artificial intelligence as Free Software

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NVIDIA GeForce vs. AMD Radeon Vulkan Neural Network Performance With NCNN

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Kernel Space: Trenchboot, RAID10, Spelling Mistakes and Initcalls

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