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Huawei Just Started Selling Laptops With Deepin Linux Pre-Installed

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Linux

Some of the best and most affordable premium laptops on the market are now shipping with Linux pre-installed. More specifically they’re shipping with Deepin, a beautiful and polished desktop Linux distribution which, like Huawei, are based in China. Whether this is a result of the ongoing trade dispute between the United States and China is unknown, but it’s a nice step forward for the proliferation of Linux alternatives promoted by major OEMs.

Let’s get the disappointing news out of the way first. Right now these select Huawei laptops with Linux are only rolling out in China, via Huawei’s official e-commerce store VMall.com.

The exact models available with Deepin Linux are the Huawei MateBook X Pro, Huawei MateBook 13 and Huawei MateBook 14. It also looks like you’re stuck with the stock options for each model.

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Huawei selling MateBook laptops with Linux preinstalled

  • Huawei selling MateBook laptops with Linux preinstalled to consumers in China

    Despite the trade blacklisting of Huawei by the US government, the Chinese electronics giant's notebook division is plugging along, despite reports of component order cancellations in June, prompting concern they could exit the PC OEM market.

    Huawei is now selling the Matebook 13, Matebook 14, and Matebook X Pro at VMALL, Huawei's ecommerce marketplace in China, with Deepin Linux preinstalled. Deepin is a Chinese-domestic distribution, with their own desktop environment—appropriately also called Deepin—called "the single most beautiful desktop on the market" by TechRepublic's Jack Wallen.

Huawei Reportedly Shipping Cheaper MateBook Laptops With Linux i

  • Huawei Reportedly Shipping Cheaper MateBook Laptops With Linux in China

    According to Redditor, u/xi_save_earth, the Linux models include MateBook 14 (2019), MateBook X Pro (2019) and MagicBook Pro Ryzen edition, although only base models are apparently available with the Linux option, which means people choosing to buy more powerful models will still have to buy theirs’ with Windows.

    As per the report, the Linux models have been priced 300 yuan (around Rs. 3,000 / $42) cheaper than their Windows counterparts. The devices are identical with one another in terms of their hardware, although the Windows key on the keyboard is replaced with a ‘Start’ key in the Linux devices.

    Interestingly enough, Huawei’s distro of choice isn’t one of the biggies in the Linux world, like Ubuntu or Mint, but instead, the company is using a debian-based operating system called ‘Deepin’ that’s developed by Chinese tech firm, Wuhan Deepin Technologies.

    Formerly known as Linux Deeping and HiWeed Linux, Deepin is believed to have been in development in its various avatars since 2004. It has generally been praised for its aesthetics and usability, but had once courted controversy for using a statistical tracking service in its App Store. The controversial code is since believed to have been removed.

Huawei is Now Selling Linux Laptops

  • Huawei is Now Selling Linux Laptops

    If you follow tech news, you must have heard of Huawei. It’s a Chinese multinational company in telecommunication and consumer electronics.

    A prominent player in the telecom sector, Huawei has been marred with controversy. It’s been long seen as a dubious front by the Chinese government to spy on other countries through its massive telecom infrastructure.

    Earlier this year, the US government imposed a ban on Huawei that sparked a trade war between China and United States of America. Google banned Huawei from using Android and other Google services like Play Store, Gmail etc on Huawei devices. It is still not clear if the ban is in affect or not.

Huawei now sells MateBook laptops in China running Linux

  • Huawei now sells MateBook laptops in China running Linux

    Ever since Huawei was put on the US’ blacklist, the future of its products has been put into question. The company has more or less bragged about its self-sufficiency in terms of hardware components but software, especially mobile, is a different story. The company has been reportedly looking for alternative operating systems to put on its devices and it seems it may have settled on Linux for some of its laptops being sold in China.

Huawei Starts Selling Laptops With Linux Preinstalled

  • Huawei Starts Selling Laptops With Linux Preinstalled

    Huawei is now selling the Matebook 13, Matebook 14, and Matebook X Pro to consumers in China with Deepin Linux preinstalled. "Deepin is a Chinese-domestic distribution, with their own desktop environment -- appropriately also called Deepin," notes TechRepublic.

Huawei launches MateBooks running Linux in China

  • Huawei launches MateBooks running Linux in China

    TROUBLED TECH TITAN Huawei has had a fairly lousy year so far, and as yet, there's no end in sight.

    Fortunately, Huawei is taking some decisive action, at least in China, as it widens the appeal of its near-universally acclaimed MateBook series of laptops with a range powered by Linux.

    The last MateBook launch in the US was cancelled following the decision to add Huawei to the so-called "Entity List" of companies banned from trading with the US without a special licence.

    Up until then, the Shenzhen company had been churning out some of the best laptops of the last few years, and now, the MateBook 13 is available running a lovely shiny Linux distro.

Huawei Opts for Linux on Its Laptops

  • Huawei Opts for Linux on Its Laptops

    Huawei created its own operating system called HarmonyOS to potentially replace Android on smarpthones, but for laptops, the Chinese company is opting for Linux.

    As TechRepublic reports, Huawei continues to face trade restrictions with the US, meaning it needs to rethink the software shipping on its devices. For phones, that means HarmonyOS instead of Android if necessary. Now that same thinking is being applied to laptops because Windows 10 is developed by Microsoft, a US company.

    Huawei's Windows-alternative is a rather obvious one and it looks to be already using it. Three listings have appeared in China for the MateBook 13, MateBook 14, and MateBook X Pro, all of which run Deepin Linux. And as there's no Windows license to pay, the laptops are priced between $42-$84 cheaper depending on which model is chosen.

Huawei is selling Linux laptops in China

  • Huawei is selling Linux laptops in China

    Huawei is selling Linux laptops in China

    09/13/2019 at 8:40 AM by Brad Linder 4 Comments

    Huawei’s laptops have made a bit of a splash in recent years thanks to a combination of strong performance, design, and build quality.

    But Huawei is a relative newcomer to the personal computer space, having introduced its first tablet in 2016 and its first laptop just a year later.

    So with the company still dealing with the fallout of US trade policy generally as well as those targeted specifically at Huawei, it’s unsurprising to see Huawei looking for alternatives to US-based software. Huawei’s Harmony OS is coming to smart TVs and other devices (possibly including phones). And it looks like Huawei is already selling laptops with Linux software in China. There’s no word on whether the company plans to use Linux rather than Windows in other markets.

5 more articles about Huawei adopting GNU/Linux

  • Huawei Is Selling Laptops Running Linux In China

    Specifically, these laptops are the Huawei MateBook X Pro, MateBook 13 and MateBook 14. They run Deepin Linux, which some would argue as the better looking versions of the operating system. This particular distribution of Linux also recently added a cloud sync feature. This lets you save various system settings to the cloud, which can be useful if you foresee reinstalling your OS often.

  • HUAWEI MATEBOOK LINUX (DEEPIN) VERSION DEMONSTRATED

    Huawei has a laptop series called MateBook. In this line, the company has released a number of outstanding models designed for all categories of customers. And if taking into account that Honor belongs to Huawei as well, we can say there are notebooks packed with both Intel and AMD chips. But still, something is missing. Earlier today, the company announced the new Huawei MateBook Linux version. It turns out Huawei and Deepin Linux have already carried out ‘long-term adaptation work’.

    [...]

    Though Huawei didn’t disclose much and didn’t talk about the goals of designing this laptop, we think it’s mainly related to the US list of entities. After all, both hardware and software are subject to the other party’s constraints. Huawei needs to prepare alternative solutions. Although Huawei has developed its own system, a more mature Linux system is also a good choice. Agree, in this sense, Deepin Linux is a good choice. It is quite possible for Huawei to cooperate with one of the most mature Linux distributions.

  • Huawei starts selling Matebook laptop models running Linux via VMall in China

    Apart from the smartphone business, one of Huawei‘s stronghold is its laptop business. Huawei manufactures some of the best laptops worldwide, in terms of design and even the configuration (hardware and software). Until now, Huawei laptops run Microsoft Windows but the recent US trade ban is threatening to shut down the laptop business. Well. that isn’t going to happen as Huawei has started selling its latest Matebook models running Deepin Linux.

    [...]

    The Chinese tech giant had also hinted that it would launch laptops running its self-developed HarmonyOS in the future. But for now, Deepin Linux comes to the rescue and we believe the company must have worked on the software to ensure that the desktop and other aspects like battery are optimised.

  • Huawei sells Matebooks with Linux

    Huawei is now flogging the Matebook 13, Matebook 14, and Matebook X Pro in China with Deepin Linux preinstalled.

    For those not in the know, Deepin is a Chinese-domestic distribution, with their own desktop environment. It is possible that Huawei may lose the ability to purchase Windows licenses from Microsoft due to their placement on the "entity list," restricting companies dealing in U.S.-origin technology from conducting business with Huawei, constituting an effective blacklisting by the US government. While it might take pressure of Huawei if the US trade war gets even uglier, Huawei is passing along the savings to consumers.

    The Matebook 13 and 14 models get a 300 yuan ($42) price cut, though the Linux version of the MateBook X Pro is listed at 600 yuan ($84) higher.

  • Huawei Linux Laptops Running Deepin Linux Now Available

    Three brand new Huawei Linux Laptops running Deepin have been released by the Chinese tech giant. Deepin is a Linux distro developed in China.

    The Chinese association with Deepin is a little unsettling for some users. But the source code of this Linux distro is open for everyone to go through, so there are no serious issues there.

Op-Ed: Some Huawei laptops in China now come loaded with Deepin

  • Op-Ed: Some Huawei laptops in China now come loaded with Deepin Linux

    For its smartphones Huawei has been using Google's Android operating system (OS). It can still use the system but only the open source version that lacks key features and important apps that the proprietary system had. Huawei has developed its own Harmony OS but so far is used only in smart TVs. It is not clear yet if it will be developed for smart phones.

    In the case of Huawei laptops Huawei had been using Windows 10 another US product by Microsoft. However, in China it is now replacing Windows 10 by Deepin Linux a Chinese release of Linux. There are numerous Linux versions most of them free.

Huawei releases Linux variants of the MateBook...

  • Huawei releases Linux variants of the MateBook 13, MateBook 14, and MateBook X Pro

    The prices for the three Huawei Linux laptops are advertised as 5,399 yuan (~US$763) for the MateBook 13, 5,699 yuan (~US$805) for the practically identical but slightly larger MateBook 14, and 8,699 yuan (US$1,229) for the high-end MateBook X Pro. The three devices are scheduled for availability in September, but it’s not known if Huawei plans on releasing laptops operating on Deepin OS outside of China.

Huawei embraces deepin Linux as Microsoft Windows 10...

  • Huawei embraces deepin Linux as Microsoft Windows 10 future remains uncertain

    Huawei makes some of the best laptops around -- the company actually puts Apple's design team to shame. This focus on elegance cannot be said for many other Windows PC manufacturers, as they often just set their sights on cutting corners to keep prices down.

    And that is why Donald Trump's xenophobic attacks on Huawei are so tragic. Huawei's computers and smartphones are wonderful, but with uncertainty about access to Windows and proper Android (with Google apps), consumers are correct to be a bit concerned.

Linux In, Windows Out: Huawei Laptops Coming With Deepin Linux

  • Linux In, Windows Out: Huawei Laptops Coming With Deepin Linux Pre-Installed

    The mid-May sanction has forced the Chinese tech giant to look for alternatives, and while everybody knew Linux was the first option, Huawei has been working hard on its very own operating system as well.

    Called HongMeng, this project eventually turned to be a platform for IoT devices, but it can easily convert to mobile and desktop if needed.

    However, Linux appears to be Huawei’s choice in the short term, and the company thus launched the very first devices running this operating system in its home market.

Bad news for Microsoft as Huawei starts shipping Matebooks

  • Bad news for Microsoft as Huawei starts shipping Matebooks with Linux

    Huawei’s struggles with the US government is still far from over, with the company currently only 30 days into a 90-day reprieve from the US Commerce Department’s ban which prevents US companies from trading with the Chinese giant.

    While there is a possibility that this ban will be extended again and again, there is also the possibility that come December Huawei will no longer have access to Google’s Android and Microsoft’s Windows operating systems.

    On smartphones, Huawei is working on Harmony OS to replace Android. While this operating system could run on the desktop it would need a lot more development.

    There is however a readymade free OS for the desktop already, Linux, and today Betanews reports that Huawei has started selling their MateBook 13, MateBook 14, and MateBook X Pro running the OS in China.

Huawei MateBook laptops now come with Linux

  • Huawei MateBook laptops now come with Linux

    Huawei has launched a new range of its popular MateBook series of laptops powered by Linux but unfortunately, you'll have to be in China to pick one up.

    The launch of the last MateBook in the US was canceled following the US government's decision to add the Chinese networking giant to its Entity List alongside other companies that are banned from trading with the US without a special license.

    Now Huawei has released a new, slightly cheaper, version of its MateBook 13 which runs the Chinese made Linux distro, Deepin. The device is physically identical to other MateBooks which run Windows except for the fact that the Windows key now reads “start”.

From pro-Microsoft/Windows site

  • Huawei Replaces Windows with Linux on New Laptops

    Huawei’s problems with the United States government have been well documented. US companies are forbidden from trading with the Chinese company once a 90 day reprieve is over. Thirty days into that reprieve, Huawei has announced its laptops will now run Linux as an operating system.

    Under the US trade ban, Huawei will not be able to access Google services and Microsoft’s Windows. The company has already embraced its own Harmony OS to replace Android.

    Luckily for Huawei, the company does not need to develop its own system for PC. That’s because there is an open and free OS readily available, Linux.

    In China, Huawei is already selling its MateBook 13, MateBook 14, and MateBook X Pro devices running the Linux platform. Deepin is being used as the distro, a Chinese fork of the Debian distribution.

Huawei has started shipping Matebooks with Linux

  • Huawei has started shipping Matebooks with Linux

    Although in recent months, the news published about Huawei has not been about how good their products are or how good their sales are, but about Trump’s decision to ban the company from using future versions of American products, like Android. Today we bring you a very positive one. Huawei has started selling computers with Linux operating system.

    For now, Huawei is selling its Linux computers only for the Asian market, that is, in China, the manufacturer’s country of origin. but it is likely to expand worldwide.

Buying Huawei: A wolf in sheep’s clothing?

  • Buying Huawei: A wolf in sheep’s clothing?

    Creating a rival for its key technology at the level Huawei’s is suggesting is unprecedented, yet other businesses have either had to give their intellectual property away or, taken a stance that is generally counter to good business: AT&T and its UNIX operating system in the 1970s is a good example. Google has famously done rather well by making its Android operating system (OS) Open Source, and Tesla, with founder Elon Musk stating he: “will not initiate patent lawsuits against anyone who, in good faith, wants to use our technology.”

    However, could this move by Huawei be little more than an attempt to protect its future profitability in a mobile market that is about to explode once again as 5G ushers in a new age of connectivity? And Huawei is about to release their own OS, which they hope will rival Android. There is more hope than substance, as users still won’t be able to use many of their favourite apps when the latest Huawei handsets are launched.

    Don’t forget, the current block on US firms selling technology to Huawei includes Apps from Google. Huawei smartphones might use the Open Source Android OS, but their Apps are banned from export due to the US’s arguments that this technology could be a national security issue. So, Huawei’s 5G handsets wouldn’t have YouTube or Gmail for instance. Is Mr. Zhengfei’s offer a backhanded way to get this ban lifted? As the Economist points out, 50% of Huawei sales came from selling its smartphones. All eyes are on how Huawei’s new Mate 30 performs in the marketplace.

Huawei Laptops coming with Linux Replacing Windows

  • Huawei Laptops coming with Linux Replacing Windows

    Huawei even though is a huge company and a worldwide known name is having a hard time this year. After the ban on its trade selectively it’s been a turning point for Huawei as they have to tackle many of the things now. Any new product that the Chinese company comes up with now is prohibited to use Windows on it now. It’s not a good phase for Huawei and finding alternative might be possible for the brand but having the customers face it might be troublesome. They are said to work on their own operating system to replace Windows on the new products and are calling it Hongxing. The project itself is a substitute for windows but can work as a bit mobile and computer giving high hopes to users.

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