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OSS: LibreOffice et al, OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits, CMS news and Collapse OS

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OSS
  • 8 tech freebies: Firewall, cloud storage, Office software and more

    LibreOffice is a set of open source software that’s equivalent to Microsoft Office. It lets you save and open documents in Microsoft formats and do everything Microsoft Office lets you do, like type in documents, set up spreadsheets and create presentations.

    If you’d like access to Microsoft Office, you can get the free trial of Office 365 for a month or you can try Office Online, a cloud-based version of the Microsoft Office Suite available to those with Microsoft accounts. Whichever software you get, you’ll have some amazing office capabilities without paying any money at all.

  • OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits

    Sometime in the last week OpenBSD crossed 400,000 commits (*) upon all our repositories since starting at 1995/10/18 08:37:01 Canada/Mountain. That's a lot of commits by a lot of amazing people.

  • Steve Kemp: A blog overhaul

    All in all the solution was flexible and it wasn't too slow because finding posts via the SQLite database was pretty good.

    Anyway I've come to realize that freedom and architecture was overkill. I don't need to do fancy presentation, I don't need a loosely-coupled set of plugins.

    So now I have a simpler solution which uses my existing template, uses my existing posts - with only a few cleanups - and generates the site from scratch, including all the comments, in less than 2 seconds.

    After running make clean a complete rebuild via make upload (which deploys the generated site to the remote host via rsync) takes 6 seconds.

  • WordPress 5.3 Beta 3

    WordPress 5.3 Beta 3 is now available!

    This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site to play with the new version.

  • Introducing Collapse OS, a z80 kernel that can be designed with “scavenged parts and program microcontrollers”

    There is a new operating system in the market which is designed in anticipation of the collapse of the current economic system – Collapse OS. The goal of this project is “to be as self-contained as possible.” With a copy of this project, its developer Virgil Dupras says, a capable person will be able to easily build and install Collapse OS without external resources. It will also be possible to build a machine with an exclusive design, and from discarded parts with low-tech tools.

    Dupras believes that the global supply chain will collapse before 2030 and post-collapse, it would be difficult to reproduce most of the electronics due to lack of supply chain. This will make it impossible to bootstrap the new electronic technology and thus limit its growth. At this point, Dupras says, Collapse OS can prove to be a good “starter kit”. He affirms that this operating system can be designed from “scavenged parts and program microcontrollers” with sufficient RAM and storage.

Collapse OS is a Special Operating System...

  • Collapse OS is a Special Operating System for the Post-Apocalyptic Future

    As reported by Motherboard, there’s a new open-source operating system that is currently under heavy development, and it looks like it will soon be ready for a very dire scenario. Its creator, Virgil Dupras, is a person who believes there’s a good chance that by 2030, the world will have collapsed. The software developer isn’t absolutely certain about this, but he believes that the chances of the scenario are high enough to justify the development of a post-apocalyptic operating system, called “Collapse OS”.

    So, what would the ideal scavenger’s operating system be like? The simple answer to this would be “one that can run on virtually anything”. If there is one system out there that can run on almost any hardware, this is the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Collapse OS is taking things a lot further, being able to run on microcontrollers such as the ubiquitous Z80 microprocessor. Dupras considered what piece of hardware would be the easiest to find in a post-apocalyptic world, and Z80 came as the definitive answer. This 8-bit microprocessor is in cash registers, computers, music instruments, calculators, and virtually anything electronic.

New Open Source ‘Collapse OS’ Can Survive The Post-Apocalyptic

  • New Open Source ‘Collapse OS’ Can Survive The Post-Apocalyptic World

    Multiple threats like climate disaster, nuclear war, depletion of resources keep looming over the world, and the idea of apocalypse seems inevitable.

    In any case, it’s never a bad idea to prepare for the future in advance. So a software developer named Virgil Dupras has developed a new self-replicating open-source ‘Collapse OS‘ that can survive humanity’s darkest days.

    In the post-apocalyptic world, we’d probably have to return to old-world technology by scavenging whatever we have built so far.

    Dupras envisions a future where the global supply chain collapses — and there won’t be mass production of electronics anymore. But those who manage to get hold if it will have the upper hand.

More Collapse OS

  • Collapse OS is an open-source operating system for a post-apocalyptic future

    Wondering what kind of operating system you would use in a post-apocalyptic world after the collapse of society might sound like kind of a low priority. But that’s because you’re not actually in the situation and don’t have to worry about how humankind can make a go of it in Earth’s darkest hour yet. This is where Collapse OS, a new Z80 processor-based open-source operating system being developed by software developer Virgil Dupras, comes into play.

'Collapse OS' Is an Open Source Operating System

  • 'Collapse OS' Is an Open Source Operating System for the Post-Apocalypse

    Between nuclear weapons, climate disaster, and tech bros' unbridled thirst for control over our lives, it sure does feel like the end is approaching "nigh" status.

    In a post-apocalyptic future, be it nuclear wasteland or Anthropocene nightmare, a common sci-fi trope is that those able to harness old world technology will have the upper hand. Collapse OS is a new open source operating system built specifically for use during humanity's darkest days. According to its creator, software developer Virgil Dupras, Collapse OS is what the people of the future will need to reconfigure their scavenged iPhones. For now, though, he's hosting the project on GitHub and looking for contributors.

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AMD and Intel (x86) in Linux

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    The next version of the Linux kernel will allow monitoring temperatures of the upcoming AMD Zen 3 processors. While CPU temperature monitoring support may seem mundane and not newsworthy, what makes this Zen 3 support genuinely interesting is that it's coming pre-launch... This is the first time in the AMD Zen era we are seeing CPU temperature reporting added to the Linux driver pre-launch. Not only is it coming ahead of the CPUs hitting retail channels but the support was added by AMD engineers.

  • FFmpeg Now Supports GPU Inference With Intel's OpenVINO

    Earlier this summer Intel engineers added an OpenVINO back-end to the FFmpeg multimedia framework. OpenVINO as a toolkit for optimized neural network performance on Intel hardware was added to FFmpeg for the same reasons there is TensorFlow and others also supported -- support for DNN-based video filters and other deep learning processing.

  • Intel SGX Enclave Support Sent Out For Linux A 38th Time

    For years now Intel Linux developers have been working on getting their Software Guard Extensions (SGX) support and new SGX Enclave driver upstreamed into the kernel. SGX has been around since Skylake but security concerns and other technical reasons have held up this "SGX Foundations" support from being mainlined. There has also been an apparent lack of enthusiasm by non-Intel upstream kernel developers in SGX. This past week saw the 38th revision to the patches in their quest to upstreaming this support for handling the Memory Encryption Engine (MEE) and relates SGX infrastructure. [...] The Intel SGX foundations v38 code can be found via the kernel mailing list. The Linux 5.10 merge window is opening up next month but remains to be seen if it will be queued for this next cycle or further dragged out into 2021.

  • Intel SGX foundations
    Intel(R) SGX is a set of CPU instructions that can be used by applications
    to set aside private regions of code and data. The code outside the enclave
    is disallowed to access the memory inside the enclave by the CPU access
    control.
    
    There is a new hardware unit in the processor called Memory Encryption
    Engine (MEE) starting from the Skylake microacrhitecture. BIOS can define
    one or many MEE regions that can hold enclave data by configuring them with
    PRMRR registers.
    
    The MEE automatically encrypts the data leaving the processor package to
    the MEE regions. The data is encrypted using a random key whose life-time
    is exactly one power cycle.
    
    The current implementation requires that the firmware sets
    IA32_SGXLEPUBKEYHASH* MSRs as writable so that ultimately the kernel can
    decide what enclaves it wants run. The implementation does not create
    any bottlenecks to support read-only MSRs later on.
    
    You can tell if your CPU supports SGX by looking into /proc/cpuinfo:
    
    	cat /proc/cpuinfo  | grep sgx