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Devices Leftovers

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Hardware
  • Khadas VIM3L (Amlogic S905D3) Benchmarks, Settings & System Info

    Khadas VIM3L is the first Amlogic S905D3 SBC on the market and is sold as a lower-cost alternative to the company’s VIM3 board with a focus on the HTPC / media player market.

  • Semtech SX1302 LoRa Transceiver to Deliver Cheaper, More Efficient Gateways
  • In-vehicle computer supports new MaaS stack

    Axiomtek’s fanless, rugged “UST100-504-FL” automotive PC runs Ubuntu 18.04 or Windows on 6th or 7th Gen Intel chips, and offers SATA, HDMI, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 3x mini-PCIe, a slide-rail design, and the new AMS/AXView for MaaS discovery.

    Axiomtek announced a rugged in-vehicle PC that runs Ubuntu 18.04, Windows 10, or Windows 7 on Intel’s Skylake or Kaby Lake processors. The UST100-504-FL is aimed at “in-vehicle edge computing and video analytics applications,” and is especially suited for police and emergency vehicles, says Axiomtek. There’s also a new Agent MaaS Suite (AMS) IoT management suite available (see farther below).

  • Google Launches the Pixel 4 with Android 10, Astrophotography, and Motion Sense

    Google officially launched today the long rumored and leaked Pixel 4 smartphone, a much-needed upgrade to the Pixel 3 and 3a series with numerous enhancements and new features.

    The Pixel 4 smartphone is finally here, boasting upgraded camera with astrophotography capabilities so you can shoot the night sky and Milky Way without using a professional camera, a feature that will also be ported to the Pixel 3 and 3a devices with the latest camera app update, as well as Live HDR+ support for outstanding photo quality.

  • Repurposing A Toy Computer From The 1990s

    Our more youthful readers are fairly likely to have owned some incarnation of a VTech educational computer. From the mid-1980s and right up to the present day, VTech has been producing vaguely laptop shaped gadgets aimed at teaching everything from basic reading skills all the way up to world history. Hallmarks of these devices include a miserable monochrome LCD, and unpleasant membrane keyboard, and as [HotKey] found, occasionally a proper Z80 processor.

    [...]

    After more than a year of tinkering and talking to other hackers in the Z80 scene, [HotKey] has made some impressive headway. He’s not only created a custom cartridge that lets him load new code and connect to external devices, but he’s also added support for a few VTech machines to z88dk so that others can start writing their own C code for these machines. So far he’s created some very promising proof of concept programs such as a MIDI controller and serial terminal, but ultimately he hopes to create a DOS or CP/M like operating system that will elevate these vintage machines from simple toys to legitimate multi-purpose computers.

More in Tux Machines

Testing Slax 10.2 beta1

Changes include disabling apparmor, which was preventing some programs from starting properly (eg. man), and fixing chromium by installing chromium-sandbox package. Also added was dummy 'sudo' command (so you can copy&paste sudo commands from internet and it will work as long as you are signed in as root). I will be happy if you let me know problems you encounter, either by email, or using slax-users google group, or by commenting to this blog post. Read more

GCC: OpenMP / OpenACC and Static Analysis Framework

  • The GCC 10 Compiler Lands OpenMP / OpenACC Offloading To AMD Radeon GPUs

    A few days ago I wrote about the OpenMP / OpenACC offloading patches for Radeon "GCN" GPUs being posted and seeking inclusion in the GCC 10 compiler that will be released in a few months. Those patches were successfully merged meaning this next annual update to the GNU Compiler Collection will feature initial OpenMP/OpenACC code offloading support to supported AMD GPU targets. After GCC 9 only had the initial AMD Radeon GCN target in place, GCC 10 in early 2020 will feature the initial offloading support using the modern OpenMP and OpenACC APIs, thanks to the merges this week. The libgomp port and associated bits for the AMD GCN back-end have landed thanks to the work done by Code Sourcery under contract with AMD.

  • RFC: Add a static analysis framework to GCC
    This patch kit introduces a static analysis pass for GCC that can diagnose
    various kinds of problems in C code at compile-time (e.g. double-free,
    use-after-free, etc).
    
    The analyzer runs as an IPA pass on the gimple SSA representation.
    It associates state machines with data, with transitions at certain
    statements and edges.  It finds "interesting" interprocedural paths
    through the user's code, in which bogus state transitions happen.
    
    For example, given:
    
       free (ptr);
       free (ptr);
    
    at the first call, "ptr" transitions to the "freed" state, and
    at the second call the analyzer complains, since "ptr" is already in
    the "freed" state (unless "ptr" is NULL, in which case it stays in
    the NULL state for both calls).
    
    Specific state machines include:
    - a checker for malloc/free, for detecting double-free, resource leaks,
      use-after-free, etc (sm-malloc.cc), and
    - a checker for stdio's FILE stream API (sm-file.cc)
    
    There are also two state-machine-based checkers that are just
    proof-of-concept at this stage:
    - a checker for tracking exposure of sensitive data (e.g.
      writing passwords to log files aka CWE-532), and
    - a checker for tracking "taint", where data potentially under an
      attacker's control is used without sanitization for things like
      array indices (CWE-129).
    
    There's a separation between the state machines and the analysis
    engine, so it ought to be relatively easy to add new warnings.
    
    For any given diagnostic emitted by a state machine, the analysis engine
    generates the simplest feasible interprocedural path of control flow for
    triggering the diagnostic.
    
  • GCC Might Finally Have A Static Analysis Framework Thanks To Red Hat

    Clang's static analyzer has become quite popular with developers for C/C++ static analysis of code while now the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) might finally see a mainline option thanks to Red Hat. Red Hat's David Malcolm has proposed a set of 49 patches that appear to be fairly robust and the most we have seen out of GCC static analysis capabilities to date.

Reports From KDE Development and Lakademy 2019

  • This week in KDE: touchy and scrolly and GTK-ey and iconey

    There are some neat things to report and I think you will enjoy them! In particular, I think folks are really going to like the improvements to GNOME/GTK app integration and two sets of touch- and scrolling-related improvements to Okular and the Kickoff Application Launcher, detailed below:

  • KDE Plasma 5.18 Bringing Better GTK/GNOME App Integration

    Aside from tightening the GNOME/GTK integration with KDE, this week there has also been some Okular improvements, better touch support for the Kickoff Application Launcher, deleting files within the Dolphin file manager now uses a separate worker thread for the I/O, Spectacle can now integrate with OBS Studio as a new screen recording option, and other enhancements.

  • Lakademy 2019

    I’m now writing this post in the last hours of the Lakademy 2019 (and my first one). It was really good to be “formally” introduced to the community and it’s people, and to be in this environment of people wanting to collaborate to something as incredible as KDE. Althought I wanted to contribute more to other projects, I did some changes and fixes in the rocs, wrote my Season of KDE project and got some tasks that can help with the future of rocs.

today's howtos