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Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu!

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu has come a long way since its ‘Warty Warthog’ days. The distro is by far the most popular Linux flavor in the market right now. According to W3Techs.com, Ubuntu leads the pack with 37.4% of the market, while Debian is a close second at 21.2%.

This is a far cry from the 8.9% popularity that Ubuntu garnered when W3Techs.com first began tracking such data in January 2010. Ubuntu was the 5th most popular Linux distro back then, behind Debian, CentOS, Red Hat, and Fedora, respectively.

Not only is Ubuntu the favorite of many users, but it is also now in the workplace as well, World-wide. Many companies and individuals choose Ubuntu as their distro of choice. The top users of Ubuntu reside in the United States. However, there are also a significant number of Ubuntu users in the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, India, and the Netherlands.

Since its birth almost 14 years ago, Ubuntu has spawned many successful forks such as Linux Mint, elementary OS, Zorin OS, Pop!_OS, and KDE neon. This list does not even include some of Ubuntu’s derivatives, including Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Ubuntu Budgie.

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Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu!

  • Happy 15th Birthday, Ubuntu!

    October 20, 2019, marks the 15th anniversary of the release of Ubuntu 4.10, the first ever version of Ubuntu, a desktop Linux distribution that has arguably helped change the computing landscape for the better.

    That’s really not hyperbole, either; Ubuntu’s achievements extend well beyond its immediate orbit.

    And the best bit? Ubuntu is still going strong today, 15 years on from its first formative foray into the feral winds of free and open source software!

    Although Ubuntu is far more than “just” another desktop Linux distro these days, as its dominance and vision leading in key markets (and in whole new markets it has helped to create) is proof of, it had a humble beginning…

Happy 15th Birthday Ubuntu Linux!

  • Happy 15th Birthday Ubuntu Linux! The Amazing Tale of A Distro

    We all know the history of Linux, which has brought a massive change in the tech world. Linux as a kernel got success as it is open source. This open source system has given birth to many distro or distributions, which helped to take this kernel to the vertex of success. Among all those Distros, Ubuntu Linux rules the distro world.

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