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Programming: SystemView, JDK, VimL and Bazel

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Development
  • New SystemView Verification Tool from SEGGER is Compatible with Windows, Linux, and macOS
  • 5 steps for an easy JDK 13 install on Ubuntu
  • Basic Data Types in Python 3: Strings
  • Excellent Free Books to Learn VimL

    VimL is a powerful scripting language of the Vim editor. You can use this dynamic, imperative language to design new tools, automate tasks, and redefine existing features of Vim. At an entry level, writing VimL consists of editing the vimrc file. Users can mould Vim to their personal preferences. But the language offers so much more; writing complete plugins that transform the editor. Learning VimL also helps improve your efficiency in every day editing.

    VimL supports many common language features: variables, control structures, built-in functions, user-defined functions, expressions first-class strings, high-level data structures (lists and dictionaries), terminal and file I/O, regex pattern matching, exceptions, as well as an integrated debugger. Vim’s runtime features are written in VimL.

  • Google Releases Bazel 1.0 Build System With Faster Build Performance

    Bazel is Google's preferred build system used by many of their own software projects. Bazel is focused on providing automated testing and release processes while supporting "language and platform diversity" and other features catered towards their workflow. Bazel 1.0 comes at a time when many open-source projects have recently been switching to Meson+Ninja as the popular build system these days for its fast build times and great multi-platform build support. Bazel also still has to compete with the likes of CMake and many others.

  • Bazel Reaches 1.0 Milestone!

    Bazel was born of Google's own needs for highly scalable builds. When we open sourced Bazel back in 2015, we hoped that Bazel could fulfill similar needs in the software development industry. A growing list of Bazel users attests to the widespread demand for scalable, reproducible, and multi-lingual builds. Bazel helps Google be more open too: several large Google open source projects, such as Angular and TensorFlow, use Bazel. Users have reported 3x test time reductions and 10x faster build speeds after switching to Bazel.

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Google Releases Chrome 79 for Linux, Windows, and Mac with 51 Security Fixes

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The latest Linux kernel is headed to Chromebooks in the very near future and that’s a big deal

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Qt for MCUs 1.0 is now available

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