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Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” Released. Here's What's New

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” is released with latest features, iconic changes. Read on.

Ubuntu – the most popular and widely used Linux Operating system for desktop and servers, announced the release of fresh Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine”. This is a non-LTS release which means it is feature rich and supported till July 2020. Targeted for early adopters – Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine” brings some important changes. These changes are the foundation for the next LTS release.

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Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Officially Released

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Six months in the making, Ubuntu 19.10 is dubbed Eoan Ermine and it's Canonical's 31st release of Ubuntu Linux, one of the most popular free and Open Source operating systems in the world. Packed with numerous goodies, this release also celebrates fifteen years since the first Ubuntu release, but it's not a long-term supported version, so it will only receive software and security updates for nine months, until July 2020.

    "In the fifteen years since the first Ubuntu release, we have seen Ubuntu evolve from the desktop to become the platform of choice across public cloud, open infrastructure, IoT and AI," said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. "With the 19.10 release, Ubuntu continues to deliver strong support, security and superior economics to enterprises, developers and the wider community."

Shuttleworth sees the Linux desktop living on with Ubuntu 19.10

  • Shuttleworth sees the Linux desktop living on with Ubuntu 19.10

    Canonical has just released Ubuntu Linux 19.10, Eoan Ermine. Like most modern Linux distributions, it comes with many improvements aimed at delivering enterprise services for the cloud and Kubernetes container orchestration. But Ubuntu hasn't turned its back on the Linux desktop.

    In an interview, Canonical CEO and founder Mark Shuttleworth explained: "We never got the desktop into the consumer space. We're still happy to give developers and system admins a platform. We're still passionate about the Linux desktop."

The full press release from Canonical

  • Ubuntu 19.10 delivers Kubernetes at the edge, multi-cloud infrastructure economics and an integrated AI/ML developer experience

    17th October 2019: Canonical today announced the release of Ubuntu 19.10 with a focus on accelerating developer productivity in AI/ML, new edge capabilities for MicroK8s and delivering the fastest GNOME desktop performance.

    “In the fifteen years since the first Ubuntu release, we have seen Ubuntu evolve from the desktop to become the platform of choice across public cloud, open infrastructure, IoT and AI. With the 19.10 release, Ubuntu continues to deliver strong support, security and superior economics to enterprises, developers and the wider community,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical.

    New edge capabilities for Kubernetes

    Ubuntu 19.10 brings enhanced edge computing capabilities with the addition of strict confinement to MicroK8s. Strict confinement ensures complete isolation and a tightly secured production-grade Kubernetes environment, all in a small footprint ideal for edge gateways. MicroK8s add-ons – including Istio, Knative, CoreDNS, Prometheus, and Jaeger – can now be deployed securely at the edge with a single command. This builds on existing snaps for edge gateways already available including EdgeX and AWS IoT Greengrass.

    The Raspberry Pi 4 Model B is supported by Ubuntu 19.10. The latest board from the Raspberry Pi Foundation offers a faster system-on-a-chip with a processor that uses the Cortex-A72 architecture (quad-core 64-bit ARMv8 at 1.5GHz) and offers up to 4GB of RAM. With the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, developers get access to a low-cost board, powerful enough to orchestrate workloads at the edge with MicroK8s.

    Continued focus on improving the economics of multi-cloud infrastructure

    Ubuntu 19.10 ships with the Train release of Charmed OpenStack – the 20th OpenStack release, backed by the Nautilus release of Ceph. This marks Canonical’s long-term commitment to open infrastructure and improving the cost of cloud operations. Train provides live migration extensions to aid telcos in their infrastructure operations. Live migration allows users to move their machines from one hypervisor to another without shutting down the operating system of the machine. It is now also possible in telco-specific environments with NUMA topology, pinned CPUs, SR-IOV ports attached and huge pages configured. Nautilus introduces the automatic placement group tuning feature to improve the experience of operating a Ceph distributed storage cluster.

    Integrated AI developer experience

    Kubeflow is now available as an add-on to MicroK8s for improved machine learning and AI capabilities. In minutes, developers can set-up, develop, test and scale to their production needs. Kubeflow and GPU acceleration work out the box with MicroK8s. All dependencies are included with automatic updates and transactional security fixes so users can spend less time configuring and more time innovating.

    Ubuntu 19.10 will ship with NVIDIA drivers embedded in the ISO image to improve the performance and overall experience for gamers and AI/ML users with NVIDIA hardware, saving the need for manual installation. Ubuntu 19.10 uses the 5.3 kernel, which introduces support for the AMD Navi GPUs and Zhaoxin x86 processors for workstations.

    15 years on – still delivering the most usable Linux desktop

    With GNOME 3.34, Ubuntu 19.10 is the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive and smooth experience, even on older hardware. App organisation is easier with the ability to drag and drop icons into categorised folders, while users can select light or dark Yaru theme variants depending on their preference or for improved viewing accessibility.

    Native support for ZFS on the root partition is introduced as an experimental desktop installer option. Coupled with the new zsys package, benefits include automated snapshots of file system states, allowing users to boot to a previous update and easily roll forwards and backwards in case of failure.

    Ubuntu 19.10 will be available to download here.

    To learn more about Ubuntu 19.10, click here to join the webinar on 23rd October 2019.

Bug in the ISO

  • Ubuntu 19.10's Kernel Ships With A DoS / Arbitrary Code Execution Bug In The IPv6 Code

    If you are planning to run the newly-released Ubuntu 19.10, among the initial round of stable release updates is an important kernel fix.

    A Phoronix reader pointed us to a vulnerability within Ubuntu 19.10's default kernel due to a patch not being picked up from the Linux stable tree quick enough. The issue in the IPv6 kernel code can lead to a denial of service issue or possible arbitrary code execution vulnerability.

More videos and coverage

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) released

    Ubuntu has announced the release of 19.10 "Eoan Ermine" in desktop and server editions as well as all of the different flavors: Ubuntu Budgie, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Installation Overview and Walkthrough
  • Kubernetes on a single machine

    As developers, we do not always have access to a production-like environment to test new features and run proof-of-concepts. This is why it can be very interesting to deploy Kubernetes on a single machine. Of course, there is the new microk8s snap that allows a super fast deployment of a k8s cluster on a laptop (and it is definitely worth a try, look here to see how I deployed and tested it in just a few minutes), but if you’re looking for the full experience, here’s how I deployed the Charmed Distribution of Kubernetes on LXD containers in a single bare-metal machine.

    Note: This is an adaptation of Michael Iatrou’s post with the newer LXD version 3.18 and Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver.

    You will need a machine equipped with at least 4 CPU cores, 16GB RAM,100GB free disk space, preferably SSD and one NIC. I am using MAAS to deploy Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS on a machine. I configured a Linux bridge (br0) and attached one NIC (eno1) to it. Here is the /etc/netplan/config.yaml configuration of my machine.

  • What to do after installing Ubuntu 19.10

    In this video, we are looking at what to do after installing Ubuntu 19.10. Enjoy!

  • What's new in Ubuntu 19.10

    In this video, we are looking at what's new in Ubuntu 19.10. Enjoy!

  • What's New In Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine)

    Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) is available for download. Read on if you want to see what new features and improvements are included with this new Ubuntu release.

    This Ubuntu version is supported for 9 months. For a longer supported release, use Ubuntu 18.04 LTS instead, which is supported until April 2023.

    Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) uses GNOME 3.34

    Ubuntu 19.10 uses the latest GNOME 3.34 (with 3.34.1 for some components). You'll find the latest version of GNOME Shell, GDM, and GNOME Settings, as well as applications like File (Nautilus), Text Editor (Gedit), Terminal, and so on.

    GNOME Software app is still at version 3.30.6 though, with a bug report mentioning that the reasons for not updating it being "regressions on debs support" and the lack of testing. This started with Ubuntu 19.04, and continued with this new Ubuntu 19.10 release.

Xubuntu 19.10 released!

  • Xubuntu 19.10 released!

    The Xubuntu team is happy to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 19.10!

    Xubuntu 19.10, codenamed Eoan Ermine, is a regular release and will be supported for 9 months, until July 2020. If you need a stable environment with longer support time, we recommend that you use Xubuntu 18.04 LTS instead.

    The final release images are available as torrents and direct downloads from xubuntu.org/getxubuntu/

    As the main server might be busy in the first few days after the release, we recommend using the torrents if possible.

    Xubuntu Core, our minimal installation option, is available to download from unit193.net/xubuntu/core/. Find out more about Xubuntu Core here.

    We’d like to thank everybody who contributed to this release of Xubuntu!

New video review

Lubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Released!

  • Lubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) Released!

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, Lubuntu 19.10 has been released! With the codename Eoan Ermine, Lubuntu 19.10 is the 17th release of Lubuntu and the third release of Lubuntu with LXQt as the default desktop environment.

This fall, Ubuntu 19.10 stars as Eoan Ermine in...

  • This fall, Ubuntu 19.10 stars as Eoan Ermine in... Dawn of the Stoats

    Canonical has released Ubuntu 19.10, codenamed Eoan Ermine for some reason.

    Ubuntu 19.10 is only supported until July 2020. The next LTS (Long Term Support) release will be 20.04 next year. Businesses using Ubuntu in production may prefer to wait for 20.04, for which 19.10 serves as a useful preview.

    Based on the Linux 5.3 kernel, Ubuntu 19.10 comes with an updated developer toolchain including GCC 9.2.1 and most packages have been compiled with additional GCC hardening options enabled for improved security. The default desktop is GNOME 3.34.

    Ubuntu is increasing its use of Snap packaging. Snap is a container technology designed for desktop applications. A Snap container has read-only access to system resources but can be configured to have full permissions for your files and documents.

Geeky Gadgets and Tom's Hardware Coverage

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine Final release now available

    Planned the Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine final release has now been made available to download providing a wealth of features for business users, gamers and a new Gnome desktop. Other features of Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine include : Linux 5.3 kernel series with LZ4 compression algorithm for initramfs, experimental ZFS support in the installer, LibreOffice 6.3 office suite, PulseAudio 13.0 sound system, and Firefox 69 web browser and of course the already mentioned GNOME 3.34 desktop environment.

    Ubuntu 19.10 also features out-of-the-box support for the latest Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single-board computer, and Nvidia-specific enhancements like better startup reliability when using the Nvidia graphics driver, which is now included in the ISO image by default, as well as improved rendering smoothness and frame rates specifically for Nvidia GPUs. If you’re interested in learning more about Raspberry Pi operating systems jump over to our previous post.

    Under the hood, the toolchain was also refreshed with GCC 9.2.1, Glibc 2.30, Python 3.7.5, Ruby 2.5.5, PHP 7.3.8, Perl 5.28.1, Golang 1.12.10, OpenJDK 11, QEMU 4.0, dpdk 18.11.2, libvirt 5.6, Open vSwitch 2.12, OpenStack Train, and Rustc 1.37. The AArch64 and POWER toolchains have been enabled to cross-compile for ARM, S390X, and RISCV64 architectures.

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Debuts With Raspberry Pi 4 Support

    Canonical released Ubuntu 19.10 (also known as Eoan Ermine) today with support for the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B. The update isn't all good for Raspberry Pi enthusiasts, though, as the company said that "Ubuntu 19.10 Raspberry Pi images can no longer boot on the Raspberry Pi 3 A+ development devices."

    Raspberry Pi 4 support isn't Eoan Ermine's main draw. It also updates the distro to the Linux 5.3 kernel, introduces the GNOME 3.34 user interface and makes numerous improvements to Ubuntu's security. More information about the changes arriving with Ubuntu 19.10 is available in the release notes on its website.

    In its announcement, Canonical noted that "with the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B, developers get access to a low-cost board, powerful enough to orchestrate workloads at the edge with MicroK8s."

Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ Has Arrived: Downloads Available Now!

  • Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’ Has Arrived: Downloads Available Now!

    It’s time to stand tall like the short-tailed weasel to make way for Ubuntu’s new release 19.10 Eoan Ermine. After six months of development, Ubuntu 19.10 is finally here.

    You might have already seen our list of the features of Ubuntu 19.10 while we tried the beta recently. In this article, I shall highlight a few key features and mention the official download links to get your hands on the new Ubuntu release.

Kubuntu 19.10 is released today

  • Kubuntu 19.10 is released today

    Kubuntu 19 .10 has been released, featuring the beautiful KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop.

    Codenamed “Eoan Ermine”, Kubuntu 19.10 integrates the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.

    The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Download Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine and Official Flavours

  • Download Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine and Official Flavours with Torrents and Checksums

    Ubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine released this Thursday, 17 October 2019 as planned. Canonical, the company that develops Ubuntu, publishes the announcement at mailing list and website with webinar What's new in Ubuntu 19.10 that will be held 24 October 2019. You can read the official announcement published at mailing list and website. Not less important, you can read Release Notes, detailed information, of Eoan Ermine and all Flavours at Ubuntu Wiki. As usual, I listed here all download links of Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Lubuntu and all desktop Flavours with torrents and checksums. You just need to click the link you want and download it. Happy downloading!

Here’s When You Can Upgrade To The New Pop OS 19.10

  • Here’s When You Can Upgrade To The New Pop OS 19.10

    The entire flavorful family of Ubuntu 19.10 is now available for upgrades and downloads, but some Ubuntu-based distributions don’t follow as strict a release schedule. In the case of my current daily driver Pop!_OS, version 19.10 will be available “When It’s Ready™” but all signs are pointing to today or tomorrow at the latest.

    According to the Pop OS Upgrade project tracker on GitHub, there are still a handful of issues to test before the 19.10 release gets the green light and hits the servers.

    “We're almost there,” says System76 Product Engineer Michael Aaron Murphy. “There are a handful of last minute issues to fix, and we'll be able to roll out 19.10 with Tensorman and our new upgrade feature.”

Ubuntu 19.10 delivers Kubernetes at the edge

  • Ubuntu 19.10 delivers Kubernetes at the edge, multi-cloud infrastructure economics and integrated AI/ML for developers

    Canonical has released Ubuntu 19.10 with a focus on accelerating developer productivity in AI/ML. It also offers new edge capabilities for MicroK8s and aims to deliver the fastest GNOME desktop performance.

    “In the fifteen years since the first Ubuntu release, we have seen Ubuntu evolve from the desktop to become the platform of choice across public cloud, open infrastructure, IoT and AI. With the 19.10 release, Ubuntu continues to deliver strong support, security and superior economics to enterprises, developers and the wider community,” says Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical.

    Ubuntu 19.10 brings enhanced edge computing capabilities with the addition of strict confinement to MicroK8s. Strict confinement ensures complete isolation and a tightly secured production-grade Kubernetes environment, all in a small footprint ideal for edge gateways. MicroK8s add-ons – including Istio, Knative, CoreDNS, Prometheus, and Jaeger – can now be deployed securely at the edge with a single command. This builds on existing snaps for edge gateways already available including EdgeX and AWS IoT Greengrass.

Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) released

  • Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) released

    Codenamed “Eoan Ermine”, 19.10 continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

    The Ubuntu kernel has been updated to the 5.3 based Linux kernel, and our default toolchain has moved to gcc 9.2 with glibc 2.30. Additionally, the Raspberry Pi images now support the new Pi 4 as well as 2 and 3.

    Ubuntu Desktop 19.10 introduces GNOME 3.34 the fastest release yet with significant performance improvements delivering a more responsive experience. App organisation is easier with the ability to drag and drop icons into categorised folders and users can select light or dark Yaru theme variants. The Ubuntu Desktop installer also introduces installing to ZFS as a root filesystem as an experimental feature.

Ubuntu 19.10 delivers goodies for gamers and a slick new Gnome

  • Ubuntu 19.10 delivers goodies for gamers and a slick new Gnome desktop

    On the business front, the latest version of this popular Linux distro introduces enhanced edge computing functionality, implementing strict confinement for MicroK8s, meaning a “tightly secured production-grade” Kubernetes environment in an equally tight footprint for edge gateways.

    It’s also now possible to deploy MicroK8s add-ons securely at the edge via a single command. Note that with support now in place for the Raspberry Pi 4, devs have an affordable hardware option to deploy at the edge with MicroK8s.

    Furthermore, Kubeflow has been made available as an add-on to MicroK8s in the cause of boosting machine learning chops. Developers benefit from speedy setup, testing and scaling to production needs. Canonical notes that Kubeflow and GPU acceleration work straight out of the box with MicroK8s.

    The move with embedding Nvidia drivers we mentioned at the outset will also help those involved in the machine learning or AI arena using hardware from that GPU maker, as obviously everything will be already there for them right off the bat.

    Ubuntu 19.10 will also witness the introduction of support for Zhaoxin x86 CPUs for workstations.

Vivek Gite's take

  • Ubuntu Linux 19.10 released: New Features and Download

    Ubuntu Linux 19.10 is a notable upgrade that ships with much-updated software that developers like to build web apps, container workloads, AI/MI programming, or gaming using NVIDIA GPU. The desktop provides a pleasant experience and could be a great addition to newly announced XPS 13 or Thinkpad T or X series laptops. I am using it and loving it. Go for it.

Ubuntu Studio 19.10 Released

  • Ubuntu Studio 19.10 Released

    The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 19.10, code-named “Eoan Ermine”. This marks Ubuntu Studio’s 26th release. This release is a regular release and as such, it is supported for 9 months.

    For those requiring longer-term support, we encourage you to install Ubuntu Studio 18.04 “Bionic Beaver” and add the Ubuntu Studio Backports PPA, which will keep 18.04 supported through April 2020.

    Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

Ubuntu 19.10 - Overview of the GNOME Desktop & Usage Tips

Kubuntu sponsors

  • Thanks to our Sponsors

    The Kubuntu community is delighted and proud to ship Kubuntu 19.10. As a community of passionate contributors we need systems and services that enable us to work together, and host our development tools.

    Our sponsors page provides details and links to the organisations that have supported us through our development process.

    Bytemark is a UK based hosting provider that generously provide racked and hosted bare metal hardware upon which our build chain KCI ( Kubuntu Continuous Integration ) operates.

Ubuntu 19.10 lands with GNOME 3.34, Linux Kernel 5.3...

  • Ubuntu 19.10 lands with GNOME 3.34, Linux Kernel 5.3, Raspberry Pi 4 support and more

    Canonical, the company behind Linux Ubuntu, has put the finishing touches on Ubuntu 19.10 (or Eoan Ermine, if you'd rather). There's a lot of new features and updates with this release to dig into, so be sure to check out the release notes. Otherwise, there's a few main draws for Ubuntu 19.10.

    One of the highlights of Ubuntu 19.10 is improved hardware support, especially as it pertains to Nvidia users. Ubuntu 19.10 comes with Nvidia drivers directly in the ISO, and Canonical notes other Nvidia-specific enhancements such as rendering smoothness, frame rates and reliability. Ubuntu 19.10 is also based on the Linux Kernel 5.3, and with it comes support for AMD's Navi-based GPUs, Ryzen 3000-series motherboards, Zhaoxin x86 processors, and new Arm SoCs.

Ubuntu 19.10 releases with MicroK8s add-ons, GNOME 3.34...

  • Ubuntu 19.10 releases with MicroK8s add-ons, GNOME 3.34, ZFS on root, NVIDIA-specific improvements, and much more!

    Yesterday, Canonical announced the release of Ubuntu 19.10 which is the fastest Ubuntu release with significant performance improvements to accelerate developer productivity in AI/ML.

    This release brings enhanced edge computing capabilities with the addition of strict confinement to MicroK8s, which will safeguard the complete isolation and presents a secured production-grade Kubernetes environment. This allows MicroK8s add-ons like Istio, Knative, CoreDNS, Prometheus, and Jaeger to be deployed securely at the edge with a single command. Ubuntu 19.10 also delivers other features like NVIDIA drivers which are embedded in the ISO image to improve the performance of gamers and AI/ML users.

Ubuntu 19.10 is here nearly 15 years after first Ubuntu release

  • Ubuntu 19.10 is here nearly 15 years after first Ubuntu release

    Ubuntu has been one oft he most popular GNU/Linux distributions for well over a decade… but the operating system has changed quite a bit over the years.

    The latest release, Ubuntu 19.10, came out this week… almost exactly 15 years after the first version of Ubuntu was released on October 20th, 2004.

    In a blog post, Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth notes that some of the biggest changes since the early days include Ubuntu’s move from a desktop-first operating system to one that now powers servers, IoT devices, and AI applications. But there are still a number of new features in Ubuntu 19.10 aimed at home users.

By TechRepublic/CBS

  • Ubuntu 19.10 brings Linux kernel 5.3, improvements for Raspberry Pi 4

    Ubuntu 19.10—the 31st release of the consumer-focused Linux distribution—was released on Thursday, powered by GNOME 3.34 and version 5.3 of the Linux kernel, which includes support for AMD Navi GPUs, as well as Intel Gemini Lake CPUs and VIA/Zhaoxin x86 CPUs.

    Other Linux distributions typically shy away from providing copyrighted code embedded into the ISO image due to legal or philosophical reasons, though Canonical is shipping NVIDIA GPU drivers out-of-the-box to ease configuration and improve performance for users of NVIDIA GPUs for gaming as well as artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) applications.

What’s New In Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’

  • What’s New In Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’

    Canonical has reached one more step close to an LTS release by releasing Ubuntu 19.10 ‘Eoan Ermine’. Eoan Ermine has been released with some new features and overall system improvements.

Ubuntu 19.10 Is Here With MicroK8s Add-Ons

Late coverage by Josh Powers

  • Ubuntu 19.10 Released

    The next development release of Ubuntu, the Eoan Ermine, was released last week! This was the last development release before our upcoming LTS, codenamed Focal Fossa. As a result, lots of bug fixes, new features, and experience improvements have made their way into the release.

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