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OpenBSD 6.6 Released

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BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.6

    This is a partial list of new features and systems included in OpenBSD 6.6. For a comprehensive list, see the changelog leading to 6.6.

  • OpenBSD 6.6 Arrives: Disables GCC In Base For ARMv7/i386, SMP Improvements, AMDGPU Added

    Theo de Raadt released OpenBSD 6.6 today as the newest feature update to this popular BSD operating system known for its security focus.

    OpenBSD 6.6 has moved to disabling GCC in its base packages for i386 and ARMv7, LLVM Clang platform support has been expanded, various SMP improvements and more system calls being unlocked, improved Linux compatibility with ACPI interfaces, a number of new hardware drivers, wired and wireless networking stack improvements, various installation enhancements, and the never-ending work on improving the security. OpenBSD 6.6 ships with OpenSSH 8.1, LibreSSL 3.0.2, OpenSMTPD 6.6, and other updated packages.

OpenBSD 6.6

  • OpenBSD 6.6 release, Oct 17, 2019

    As in our previous releases, 6.6 provides significant improvements, including new features, in nearly all areas of the system: [...]

  • OpenBSD 6.6 Released

    In a message to relevant mailing lists, Theo de Raadt (deraadt@) announced that the OpenBSD project's 47th release, OpenBSD 6.6, is now available from mirror sites worldwide.

    Rather than reproducing here the full list of new features, we refer readers to the official OpenBSD 6.6 page, and the detailed changelog.

Packt Hub's coverage: OpenBSD 6.6

  • OpenBSD 6.6 comes with GCC disabled in base for ARMv7 and i386, SMP Improvements, and more

    Yesterday, the team behind OpenBSD, a Unix-like operating system, announced the release of OpenBSD 6.6. This release has GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) disabled in its base packages for i386 and ARMv7 and expanded LLVM Clang platform support.

    OpenBSD 6.6 also features various SMP improvements, improved Linux compatibility with ACPI interfaces, a number of new hardware drivers, and more. It ships with OpenSSH 8.1, LibreSSL 3.0.2, OpenSMTPD 6.6, and other updated packages.

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