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Games: OVERKILL, Alwa's Legacy, Kingdoms and Castles and More

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Gaming
  • OVERKILL begin updating PAYDAY 2 again with a patch and new DLCs out now

    PAYDAY 2 development is officially back on and OVERKILL have today released an update with some free content, plus new DLC.

    This latest update brings some more customization options into the game, with a new Outfits system. In the Armour menu, there's now a new tab where you can change your clothes. They also threw in a few for everyone including: Tactical BDU, Raincoat, Scrubs, Winter Camo Parka, Tuxedo and a Murkywater Uniform.

  • Alwa's Legacy the successor to Alwa's Awakening announced with a Kickstarter campaign

    Alwa's Awakening was released back in 2017 to some rather good reviews, so Elden Pixels are back with the successor Alwa's Legacy.

    Much like the first game, it's a 2D action adventure. This time though, it's slightly less retro looking with much improved visuals. Still pixel art but they're combining this with plenty of modern effects. In Alwa's Legacy, there's no exact path you have to follow as it's a non-linear adventure, one that they say rewards your exploration. Just like their first game, Alwa's Legacy will also support Linux with a release planned on both Steam and GOG.

  • City-building builder Kingdoms and Castles expands again with new buildings and resources

    As the small team behind the excellent city-builder Kingdoms and Castles work towards adding in rival AI, they've released another meaty update.

    In this update they've introduced a Fish resource to give you a chance at getting more food, along with a Fishing Hut and Fishmonger so you have a full production chain. Apples are now their own unique resource, instead of magically turning into grain when stored in the Granary so they added the Produce Storage building to keep them fresh. Your peasants also now need to eat Apples on top of other food types to get max health.

  • AMD announce their third-gen Threadripper processors and a 16 core flagship Ryzen 9

    Today, AMD announced when you will be able to get your hands on their third-generation Threadripper processors if you're after a crazy amount of cores. On top of a new 16 core flagship Ryzen 9.

    First up, we have the third-generation Threadripper on the also new sTRX4 socket if you've got plenty of cash and you want a serious upgrade. AMD said that while the pin count is the same as the previous generation Threadripper, "the mapping of those pins to voltage or data will be different this time 'round" so you cannot use a third-gen Threadripper in an older socket or a previous generation in the new sTRX4 socket.

  • Christopher Allan Webber: Terminal Phase: building a space shooter that runs in your terminal

    Well it's most of one, anyway. It's a prototype that I built as a test program for Spritely Goblins.

    I've satisfied the technical needs I had in building the program; I might still finish it as a game, and it's close enough where making a satisfying game rather than just a short demo is super feasible, but I've decided to see whether or not there's actually enough interest in that at all by leaving that as a milestone on my Patreon. (We're actually getting quite close to meeting it... would be cool if it happened!)

    But what am I, a person who is mostly known for work on a federated social web protocol, doing making a game demo, especially for a singleplayer game? Was it just for fun? It turns out it has more to do with my long term plans for the federated social web than it may appear.

    And while it would be cool to get something out there that I would be proud of for its entertainment value, in the meanwhile the most interesting aspects of this demo to me are actually the technical ones. I thought I'd walk through what those are in this post, because in a sense it's a preview of some of the stuff ahead in Spritely. (Now that I've written most of this post, I have to add the forewarning that this blogpost wanders a lot, but I hope all the paths it goes down are sufficiently interesting.)

AMD Details 3rd Gen Threadripper, Ryzen 9 3950X...

  • AMD Details 3rd Gen Threadripper, Ryzen 9 3950X + Their New $49 USD CPU

    Pardon this brief article today as somewhat on paternity leave this week, but for the 25 November launch day will be all the interesting Linux-isms to talk about compatibility and performance. Being detailed today is the Ryzen 9 3950X, the first of the 3rd Gen Ryzen Threadripper processors, and even a new budget Athlon desktop processor.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games: Parkitect, Warlords I + II, FPS Counter in GNU/Linux Games

  • Parkitect - Taste of Adventure is out expanding your theme park building possibilities

    Possibly one of the most relaxing and engrossing games release last year, Parkitect just expanded with a free update and a big Parkitect - Taste of Adventure DLC.

  • Warlords I + II given the DOSBox and DRM-free treatment over on GOG

    Sometimes a lot of newer strategy games can be a bit much, perhaps a little retro flavour is in order? Warlords I + II, two strategy titles from the 90's are now on GOG. Both of them have been nicely packaged up for Linux gamers so you can just buy them both together, install and then it will run with a pre-configured DOSBox with no hassle. That's the way I like my retro gaming to be, a solid bit of nostalgia without some headaches.

  • How to Show FPS Counter in Linux Games

    Linux gaming got a major push when Valve announced Linux support for Steam client and their games in 2012. Since then, many AAA and indie games have made their way to Linux and the number of users who game on Linux have increased considerably. With the growth of Linux gaming, many users started to look for proper ways to display “frames per second” (FPS) counter as an overlay on running Linux games. An FPS counter helps in tweaking performance of running games as well as in benchmarking a PC’s overall ability to play games at different resolutions. Unfortunately there is no single unified way to display FPS counter in all Linux games that is independent of underlying technologies a game is running upon. Different renderers and APIs have different ways to display FPS counter. This guide will explain various methods that can be used to display an FPS counter in Linux games.

today's leftovers

  • NVIDIA DP MST Audio To Begin Working With The Linux 5.5 Kernel

    While the official NVIDIA Linux driver has worked well with DisplayPort Multi-Stream Transport (DP MST) setups for years now for driving large displays, audio hasn't worked under Linux for NVIDIA's driver in this combination. But with the upcoming Linux 5.5 cycle that will be addressed.

  • Fedora Update Weeks 39–45

    Somehow, my semi-weekly updates turned into monthly things. Mostly, updates per week have been rather light and stable, so it always seemed that there was no need to write an update. Of course, that ends up meaning one really large update after a long time. This past week was pretty busy, so I thought it best to finally write up a post. One small changeset was removing automated Suggests from R packages when they do not exist in Fedora yet. This is due to legal concerns on the F31 Change for automated R dependencies. So far, I’ve fixed mine, and intend to fix others’ soon. On the Python 2 front, aside from dropping unused subpackages from Fedora 32, I’ve also ported git-cinnabar’s test running from nose to unittest. This makes it easier to get the Python 2 exception. Since upstream is working on Python 3 support, I expect that this exception won’t need to be in place for long.

  • Zekr Quran (1.1.0 Final) on linux (Fedora 30)

    It work fine on Java 6 era but not anymore. You need to tweak, hack, compile you self or find package alternative. I want to build this software as RPM package so it will be available for others but maybe it will take lot of effort.. plus there is issue about licensing, humm.. maybe next time? Anyway, If you are looking for solution how to install Zekr on Fedora, just let me know. I will help.

  • Magicsee N5 Plus Amlogic S905X3 TV Box Comes with a 2.5″ SATA HDD/SSD Bay

    Amlogic S905X3 TV boxes have been announced since June. S905X3 is Amlogic’s first Arm Cortex-A55 processor and targets 4K UHD HDR TV boxes The box runs Android 9.0, and ships with an IR remote control, a power supply, an HDMI cable, and a user manual in English. There’s CLOSE/OPEN switch to open the lid and install the drive, so no tools appear to be needed to install a hard drive.

  • Mozilla Localization (L10N): L10n Report: November Edition

    As anticipated in previous reports, the release cycles are getting progressively shorter, in order to reach a consistent 4 weeks length in the first half of 2020. Firefox 71 will be released next week, on December 3rd. At that point Firefox 72 will move to beta, and the deadline to ship updates for that version will be on December 24th. Firefox 71 will ship with 3 new languages: Catalan (Valencian) (ca-valencia), Tagalog (tl), and Triqui (trs).

  • Better math import from PPTX into Impress

    Impress now has a much improved math handling in its importer from PPTX, eliminating annoying duplicated objects you had to delete after import, manually. First, thanks TU Dresden who made this work by Collabora possible.

Programming Leftovers

  • Faster Winter 4: Export lists

    Without an export, the compiler has to assume that every top-level function can possibly called from the outside, even functions that you think of as “internal”. If you have a function that you do not export, like instr, step_work and step after my change, the compiler can see all the places the function is called. If the function is only called in one place, it may inline it (copy its definition into where it is called), and simplify the code around the edges. And even if it does not inline the function, it might learn something about how the functions are used, and optimize them based on that (e.g. based on Demand Analysis).

  • Ondřej Holý: How to call asynchronous function synchronously

    GLib provides a lot of asynchronous functions, especially to deal with I/O. Unfortunately, some functions don’t have synchronous equivalents and the code has to be split into several callbacks. This is not handy in some cases. My this year’s GSoC student recently asked me whether it is possible to create synchronous function from asynchronous. He is currently working on test suite and don’t want to split test cases into several callbacks. So I decided to write a blog spot about as it might be handy for more people.

  • Sort list alphabetically with python

    You will be given a vector of string(s). You must sort it alphabetically (case-sensitive!!) and then return the first value. The returned value must be a string and have “***” between each of its letters. You should not remove or add elements from/to the array. Above is another problem in codewars, besides asking us to sort the array list and returning the first value in that list, we also need to insert stars within the characters.

  • Abolishing SyntaxError: invalid syntax ...

    Do you remember when you first started programming (possibly with Python) and encountered an error message that completely baffled you? For some reason, perhaps because you were required to complete a formal course or because you were naturally persistent, you didn't let such messages discourage you entirely and you persevered. And now, whenever you see such cryptic error messages, you can almost immediately decipher them and figure out what causes them and fix the problem. Congratulations, you are part of an elite group! Even a large number of people who claim that they can program are almost certainly less capable than you are. Given your good fortune, would you mind donating 5 to 10 minutes of your time to help countless beginners that are struggling in trying to understand Python error messages?

  • Is it too late to integrate GitOps?

    The idiom “missed the boat” can be used to describe the loss of an opportunity or a chance to do something. With OpenShift, the excitement to use this new and cool product immediately may create your own “missed the boat” moment in regards to managing and maintaining deployments, routes, and other OpenShift objects but what if the opportunity isn’t completely gone? Continuing with our series on GitOps (LINK), the following article will walk through the process of migrating an application and its resources that were created manually to a process in which a GitOps tool manages the assets. To help us understand the process we will manually deploy a httpd application. Using the steps below we will create a namespace, deployment, and service and expose the service which will create a route.