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Games: Valve, BorderDoom, BlooM, The Sapling, Red Eclipse 2, Crash World, Cyberpunk Bar Sim and The Farlanders

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Gaming
  • Valve has an Armistice Sale and Singles Day sale on Steam with some good Linux games cheap

    Yet another chance to grab a game or two from your wishlist perhaps? The Armistice Sale on Steam supports the War Child UK charity and there's also a Singles Day sale.

    For the Armistice Sale, Valve are promoting games with non-violent gameplay (or they got an update for the sale) to support children affected by the world’s deadliest conflicts.

  • BorderDoom adds a little Borderlands flavour to classic Doom

    Always on the lookout for the new and interesting, BorderDoom came across the GOL news-desk recently adding a little Borderlands flavour to Doom.

    It's quite a basic mod, once that would likely work well with the many others out there. The basic idea of it is to add in weapons with random properties like damage, number of bullets fired, firing speed and so on, plus shields that recharge and enemies that have levels to give you more of a challenge.

  • BlooM brings together the classics Doom and Blood

    Another quality mashup here, with BlooM merging together elements from both Doom and Blood into something quite different. The team behind it recently put up a fresh demo while they work on the full release which includes new maps, enemies, music and more.

  • Design your own plants and animals in the casual sim The Sapling

    Releasing with Linux support in December, The Sapling looks like a nice casual sim where you design your own plants and animals.

    Probably one of the most difficult types of games to get right, many have attempted some sort of evolution sim and it's always great to see more.

  • Red Eclipse 2 is a revamp of the classic free arena shooter coming to Steam

    I will admit this is quite a surprise, Red Eclipse is a first-person shooter I haven't seen mentioned in a long time and it seems they're closing in on a big revamped release with Red Eclipse 2.

    A classic free and open source shooter, Red Eclipse hasn't seen a released update since 1.6 back in December of 2017. Two years later, they're launching the massive upgrade for it free on Steam. Not a simple update either, they've completely changed the rendering engine to bring in Tesseract so they can support more advanced graphical features.

  • Deliver pizzas, upgrade your car and smash into everything in Crash World

    Crash World is an upcoming comedy pizza delivery game with some really silly physics and you can try an early demo right now.

    Releasing on Steam next year, it's a pretty wacky game. Bouncy physics, terrible vehicle handling, a car you can upgrade and an ever-changing city should provide plenty of amusement. This isn't some GTA-style open-world game though, it's mission-based but going off-mission is something that will happen often. It did to me anyway, I just couldn't help myself.

  • Cyberpunk Bar Sim fully funded on Kickstarter and coming to Linux

    Currently crowdfunding (successfully!) with a few days left, Cyberpunk Bar Sim takes elements inspired by both Game Dev Tycoon and VA-11 Hall-A to create a new mix of cyberpunk bar ownership.

    Starting off with nothing but a small dive bar with five stools, a counter-top and a handful of customers you will need to grow the business and expand your reach. Eventually you will pull in regulars, who will get chatty and tell you their story.

  • Build a busy city on Mars in The Farlanders, an in-development city-builder with a free web demo

    Currently in development and quite early on, The Farlanders is a tile-based city-builder set on the red planet Mars. Created by developer Angry Kid, the same behind Undervault a free roguelike dungeon crawler.

    Even though it's not finished, it's starting to really look good and it's already engrossing enough for me to recommend taking a look at it if you're in the mood for a city-builder that's a little different to the rest.

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows/Screencasts: LINUX Unplugged, Linux Headlines, Snapcraft & Ubuntu, Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix and EndeavourOS

  • apt install arch-linux | LINUX Unplugged 331

    We're myth-busting this week as we take a perfectly functioning production server and switch it to Arch. Is this rolling distro too dangerous to run in production, or can the right approach unlock the perfect server? We try it so you don't have to.

  • 2019-12-10 | Linux Headlines

    Microsoft releases Teams for Linux, SiFive enters the education market, the Eclipse Foundation champions open source on edge computing, and xs:code wants to help improve open source funding models.

  • Brunch with Brent: Alan Pope | Jupiter Extras 38

    Brent sits down with Alan Pope (popey), who shares his knack for fuzzy-testing, the beginnings of Ubuntu Podcast, insights into Ubuntu Touch and Unity, the joys and perils of being “Internet Famous”, and how to contribute meaningfully to your favorite Linux distributions. popey is a Developer Advocate at Canonical working on Snapcraft & Ubuntu, co-host of User Error and Ubuntu Podcast.

  • Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 19.10 - First Look

    Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 19.10 is the very first version of a potential new member of the Ubuntu family of Linux distributions.

  • EndeavourOS 2019.12.03 Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at EndeavourOS 2019.12.03. Enjoy!

today's howtos

ARM and AMD: GNU/Linux on Board

  • ARM Again in 2019 or 2020

    The assertion that nobody cares about SBSA is rather interesting. Obviously, nobody in the embedded area does. They just fork Linux, clone a bootloader, flash it and ship, and then your refrigerator sends spam and your TV is used to attack your printer, while they move on the next IoT product. But I do care. I want to download Fedora and run it, like I can on x86. Is that too much to ask?

  • EEPD Launches AMD Ryzen Embedded NUC Boards & Mini PCs

Programming: Rust, Haskell, Qt and Python

  • Sonja Heinze: What this blog is about

    In order to ask for an Outreachy grant for a certain open-source project, applicants first have to contribute to that project for about a month. When choosing a project, I didn’t know any Rust. But the fact that Fractal is written in Rust was an important point in favor due to curiosity. But I also expected to have a hard time at the beginning. Fortunately, that wasn’t really the case. For those who haven’t used Rust, let me give two of the reasons why: If you just start coding, the compiler takes you by the hand giving you advice like “You have done X. You can’t do that because of Y. Did you maybe mean to do Z?”. I took those pieces of advice as an opportunity to dig into the rules I had violated. That’s definitely a possible way to get a first grip on Rust. Nevertheless, there are pretty good sources to learn the basics, for example, the Rust Book. Well, to be precise, there’s at least one (sorry, I’m a mathematician, can’t help it, I’ve only started reading that one so far). It’s not short, but it’s very fast to read and easy to understand. In my opinion, the only exception being the topics on lifetimes. But lifetimes can still be understood by other means.

  • Joey Hess: announcing the filepath-bytestring haskell library

    filepath-bytestring is a drop-in replacement for the standard haskell filepath library, that operates on RawFilePath rather than FilePath.

  • Parsing XML with Qt: Updates for Qt 6

    This module provides implementations for two different models for reading and writing XML files: Document Object Model (DOM) and Simple API for XML (SAX). With DOM model the full XML file is loaded in memory and represented as a tree, this allows easy access and manipulation of its nodes. DOM is typically used in applications where you don't care that much about memory. SAX, on the other hand, is an event based XML parser and doesn't load the whole XML document into memory. Instead it generates events for tokens while parsing, and it's up to the user to handle those events. The application has to implement the handler interfaces (fully, or partially by using QXmlDefaultHandler). A lot of people find this inconvenient as it forces them to structure their code around this model. Another problem is that the current implementation of SAX (and as a consequence DOM, since it's implemented using SAX) is not fully compliant with the XML standard. Considering these downsides, Qt does not recommend using SAX anymore, and the decision has been made to deprecate those classes starting from Qt 5.15.

  • pathlib and paths with arbitrary bytes

    The pathlib module was added to the standard library in Python 3.4, and is one of the many nice improvements that Python 3 has gained over the past decade. In three weeks, Python 3.5 will be the oldest version of Python that still receive security patches. This means that the presence of pathlib can soon be taken for granted on all Python installations, and the quest towards replacing os.path can begin for real. In this post I’ll have a look at how pathlib can be used to handle file names with arbitrary bytes, as this is valid on most file systems.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #398 (Dec. 10, 2019)
  • Variables in Python

    If you want to write code that is more complex, then your program will need data that can change as program execution proceeds.

  • Creating an email service for my son’s childhood memories with Python

    This was very flexible as it allowed me to keep anything else I wanted in this document – and it was portable (to anyone who have access to some way of reading Word documents) – and accessible to non-technical people such as my son’s grandparents. After a while though, I wondered if I’d made the right decision: shouldn’t I have put it into some other format that could be accessed programmatically? After all, if I kept doing this for his entire childhood then I’d have a lot of interesting data in there… Well, it turns out that a Word table isn’t too awful a format to store this sort of data in – and you can access it fairly easily from Python. Once I realised this, I worked out what I wanted to create: a service that would email me every morning listing the things I’d put as diary entries for that day in previous years. I was modelling this very much on the Timehop app that does a similar thing with photographs, tweets and so on, so I called it julian_timehop.

  • Executing Shell Commands with Python

    Repetitive tasks are ripe for automation. It is common for developers and system administrators to automate routine tasks like health checks and file backups with shell scripts. However, as those tasks become more complex, shell scripts may become harder to maintain. Fortunately, we can use Python instead of shell scripts for automation. Python provides methods to run shell commands, giving us the same functionality of those shells scripts. Learning how to run shell commands in Python opens the door for us to automate computer tasks in a structured and scalable way. In this article, we will look at the various ways to execute shell commands in Python, and the ideal situation to use each method.