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today's leftovers

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  • ASUS & Google Team Up for ‘Tinker Board’ AI-Focused Credit-Card Sized Computers

    ASUS and Google have joined forces to develop a new project that the companies are calling ‘Tinker Board’ single board computers (SBCs). With a footprint not much larger than a credit card, the systems are designed for building small systems to work on AI inference applications like image recognition.

    The systems in question are the Tinker Edge T and Tinker Edge R. The former is based on the NXP i.MX8M with an Edge TPU chip that accelerates TensorFlow Lite, whereas the Tinker Edge R is powered by the Rockchip RK3399 Pro processor with an NPU for 4K machine learning. The SBCs officially support Android and Debian operating system, though nothing prevents them from running Linux or other OSes.

  • Big believer in government open source? Help with an open task on code.gov

    Want to collaborate on government open source code projects? Don’t forget about code.gov.

    Technologists who want to support the various missions of the federal government need not take on a full-time role to contribute. The General Services Administration‘s lead for code.gov, Karen Trebon, gave a shoutout to the site’s “open tasks” tab during a panel at the Red Hat Government Summit on Tuesday.

  • How to drive customer experience with agile principles

    Customer experience has never been more important. People can find out just about anything with a few clicks or a voice search on their phones. They can research products, services, and companies. They can do business with organizations all over the world. They can buy with a swipe and have things shipped right to their home within a day.

  • When your data doesn’t fit in memory: the basic techniques

                         

                           

    You need a solution that’s simple and easy: processing your data on a single computer, with minimal setup, and as much as possible using the same libraries you’re already using. And much of the time you can actually do that, using a set of techniques that are sometimes called “out-of-core computation”.

  • Equifax Data Breach Update: Backsliding

    After Equifax’s calamitous 2017 data breach, its settlement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and the private attorneys representing victims appears to offer two potential remedies to all 147 million American consumers affected: free credit monitoring, or if individuals already had free credit monitoring, an up to $125 cash payment. The FTC directed consumers affected by the breach to a third-party website where they could quickly and easily file their claim.

    At the time, EFF tepidly commented on the settlements’ efforts to compensate consumers. But we also noted that the $125 payments would come from a $31 million fund, meaning that if all 147 million victims chose the payment, each person’s payment would be reduced on a pro rata basis to as little as 21 cents each.

  • The Way America Votes Is Broken. In One Rural County, a Nonprofit Showed a Way Forward.

    Choctaw County’s election centers opened at 7 a.m. last Tuesday, and voters were greeted by poll workers who’d just set up brand-new voting machines.

    “If you need any help, just holler,” poll worker Albert Friddle told a voter as he walked her through the new system.

  • Microsoft Defender ATP Coming to Linux! What Does it Mean? [Ed: ItsFOSS now helps marketing of Microsoft proprietary software piggybacking the Linux brand. So much for "FOSS"... ItsMicrosoft?]
  • Microsoft Wants to Migrate Your IBM i Code to Azure [Ed: Why even choose Microsoft for any hosting?]
  • Kubernetes: 3 ways to get started

    Why has Kubernetes developed a reputation as a powerful tool? As Red Hat technology evangelist Gordon Haff has noted, “Kubernetes continues to gain steam in enterprises, and for good reason: It tames the complexity that arises as you begin to use containers at scale. It automates and orchestrates Linux container operations, eliminating many manual tasks involved in deploying and scaling containerized applications.”

    It’s also known for its learning curve: You can get a cluster up and running in a sandbox with relative ease, but running Kubernetes in production isn’t actually child’s play.

    That means that getting started with Kubernetes can feel daunting for individuals and teams new to it. This shouldn’t be crippling, though. Everyone starts somewhere.

    [...]

    Ram Middela, practice lead at NetEnrich, notes that Minikube gives you a chance to test-drive many of Kubernetes features in a single VM on a local machine.

    “You can explore most of the actual Kubernetes features from a developer perspective and learn about its features so that you can write your application deployment files and then run them on Minikube,” Middela says.

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Graphics: AMD, Intel, Vulkan/Flycast and NVIDIA

  • AMD Publishes Vega 7nm ISA Documentation - 300 More Pages Of GPU Docs

    Beyond AMD's open-source graphics driver stack of the past decade, part of their original open-source plans have also involved providing public (NDA-free) GPU hardware documentation. That has come with time though the documentation drops are not coordinated in-step with code drops. Out today, for example, is the ISA documentation on Vega 7nm. Back in 2017 was the timely release of the Vega ISA documentation and earlier this summer was even the RDNA 1.0 ISA documentation but missing out until now was the Vega 7nm ISA documentation.

  • Intel's Iris Gallium3D Driver Continuing To See Performance Optimizations On Mesa 20.0

    With the current Mesa 19.3 there is the Intel Gallium3D driver generally performing much better than their "classic" i965 driver and for Mesa 20.0 it looks to only make more ground as it switches over to this driver by default. Beyond the recent build system changes for supporting an Intel Gallium3D default and building it as part of the default x86/x86_64 Gallium3D drivers with hopes of soon flipping the switch for Broadwell and newer, more performance optimizations are still being done.

  • Dreamcast emulator Flycast adds a Vulkan renderer

    There seems to be quite a lot of interest in Vulkan lately, as more projects begin using it. Now we have the Dreamcast emulator Flycast adding Vulkan support. In the technical blog post announcing it on the Libretro site, it gives a bit of brief history of the Dreamcast GPU and mentions the usual "less overhead, more reliability and better performance in many cases" when it comes to using Vulkan although it's a lot more complicated to use.

  • NVIDIA have two new Linux drivers available, one stable and one Vulkan Beta

    NVIDIA continue pushing their drivers forwards with two new Linux driver updates available. Let's take a quick look. First, the stable 440.44 driver release as part of their long-lived branch. This adds support for the Quadro T2000 with Max-Q Design, you can now use the "__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE" environment variable for Vulkan applications and it fixes a few bugs like tearing with a G-SYNC or G-SYNC Compatible monitor when you've got something running directly on a display (like VR).

Watch these videos from the Linux App Summit

For some, the holidays are a hectic time of shopping, cooking, and a house overflowing with loved ones. For others, they’re quiet times spent with just a few friends, or even in solitude behind the warm glow of a computer monitor. And for still others, it’s a workday like any other. No matter how you end up spending the holiday season this year, there’s comfort to be found in the Linux App Summit of 2019. This summit, which combined the strengths of everyone involved in developing applications for Linux, focused on a few major topics... Read more

Most essential apps for every Linux user | 2020

When you first install a Linux distro or do a fresh install on a system, you need to install the essential apps for regular use. That is why I have prepared a quick guide list of the essential apps for every Linux user. So that you can check and go through the installation easily and get the needed apps for your better use and workflow. Read more