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10 skills every Linux system administrator should have

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I know what you're saying. You're saying, "Oh, great, someone else telling me that I need soft skills." Yes, that's what I'm telling you. Honing your interviewing skills can not only determine if you get a particular job, it can also be a major factor in the salary you get. It's true. Let's say, for example, that the salary range for a mid-level SA job is $56k to $85k per year. You might be fully qualified for the top of the range, but the company offers you $70k instead and mentions some nonsense about growth potential or they tell you that they'll bring you along when the time is right.

You need to practice answering questions. Answer the question that's asked. Don't give so much information that you see eyes glazing over, but giving answers that are too short will make you appear arrogant or flippant. Give enough examples of your work to let the interviewer(s) know that you know what you're talking about. They can ask for more details if they want to.

You have to learn to watch other people's behaviors. Are they listening to you? Are they focused on you and the interview? Do they look as though you haven't said enough when you pause to allow them to speak or ask another question? Watch and learn. Practice with other system administrators in your group. Do mock interviews with the group. I know it might sound silly, but it's important to be able to speak to other people about what you do. This practice can also be good for you in speaking with managers. Don't get too deep into the weeds with non-technical people. Keep your answers concise and friendly, and offer examples to illustrate your points.

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