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Red Hat: Ceph Storage, RHEL, OpenShift and More

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  • Comparing Red Hat Ceph Storage 3.3 BlueStore/Beast performance with Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 Filestore/Civetweb

    This post is the sequel to the object storage performance testing we did two years back based on Red Hat Ceph Storage 2.0 FileStore OSD backend and Civetweb RGW frontend. In this post, we will compare the performance of the latest available (at the time of writing) Ceph Storage i.e. version 3.3 (BlueStore OSD backend & Beast RGW frontend) with Ceph Storage 2.0 version (mid-2017) (FileStore OSD backend & Civetweb RGW frontend).

    We are conscious that results from both these performance studies are not scientifically comparable. However, we believe that comparing the two should provide you significant performance insights and enables you to make an informed decision when it comes to architecting your Ceph storage clusters.

    As expected, Ceph Storage 3.3 outperformed Ceph Storage 2.0 for all the workloads that we have tested. We believe that Ceph Storage 3.3 performance improvements are attributed to the combination of several things. The BlueStore OSD backend, the Beast web frontend for RGW, the use of Intel Optane SSDs for BlueStore WAL, block.db, and the latest generation Intel Cascade Lake processors.

  • Red Hat: Leading the enterprise Linux server market

    Red Hat has long believed that the operating system should do more than simply exist as part of a technology stack; it should be the catalyst for innovation. Underpinning almost every enterprise IT advancement, from cloud services and Kubernetes to containers and serverless, is the operating system; frequently, this operating system is Linux. Red Hat is proud of the leadership position we have long maintained in the enterprise operating system market, providing the Linux foundation to drive enterprise IT innovation forward.

    Today, we’re pleased to continue this leadership, with a new report from IDC that includes data showing that Red Hat as the leading choice for paid Linux in the worldwide server operating environment market as well as a powerful player in server operating systems at-large.

    According to the report, "Worldwide Server Operating Environments Market Shares, 2018: Overall Market Growth Accelerates:"

  • Microservices-Based Application Delivery with Citrix and Red Hat OpenShift

    Citrix is thrilled to have recently achieved Red Hat OpenShift Operator Certification (Press Release). This new integration simplifies the deployment and control of the Citrix Application Delivery Controller (ADC) to a few clicks through an easy-to-use Operator.

    Before we dive into how you can use Citrix Operators to speed up implementation and control in OpenShift environments, let me cover the benefits of using the Citrix Cloud Native Stack and how it solves the challenges of integrating ingress in Kubernetes.

  • Wavefront Automates and Unifies Red Hat OpenShift Observability, Full Stack

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise Kubernetes platform intended to make the process of developing, deploying and managing cloud-native applications easier, scalable and more flexible. Wavefront by VMware provides enterprise-grade observability and analytics for OpenShift environments across multiple clouds. Wavefront ingests, analyzes and visualizes OpenShift telemetry – metrics, histograms, traces, and span logs – across the full-stack, including distributed applications, containers, microservices, and cloud infrastructure.

    As a result of Wavefront’s collaboration with Red Hat, you can now get automated enterprise observability for OpenShift that’s full stack, through the Red Hat OpenShift Certified Wavefront Operator for OpenShift 4.1 and later. This Operator is available in Operator Hub embedded in OpenShift, a registry for finding Kubernetes Operator-backed services.

  • RHEL 8.1: A minor release with major new container capabilities

    The release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.1 is a minor update to RHEL, but a major step forward with containers. The container-tools:rhel8 application stream has been updated with new versions of Podman, Buildah, Skopeo, runc, container selinux policies and other libraries. The core set of base images in Red Hat Universal Base Image (UBI) have been updated to 8.1, and UBI has expanded to include Go 1.11.5 as a developer use case. There are now 37 images released as part of UBI - they can all be seen on the UBI product page. Finally, we have released some really good updated documentation covering rootless, and other new features in the container-tools module.

    [...]

    When we launched Red Hat Universal Base Image at Red Hat Summit in 2019, we got a lot of great feedback. One of the first requests we received was for Golang. It is a popular programming language in the Cloud Native space, and we immediately recognized the value of adding it (also, I know what you’re thinking! Stay tuned and you might see OpenJDK images soon).

    With the update to RHEL 8.1, we have added the ubi8/go-toolset container to the UBI family. This gives users the ability to compile Go applications using a pre-packaged container with Go 1.11.5.

  • Red Hat’s CTO sees open-source as driver of choice and consistency in hybrid environments

    A case can certainly be made that Red Hat Inc. and the open-source movement have commoditized portions of the information technology infrastructure. A much wider range of tools and systems are now available to enterprises than ever before.

    This trend is just part of the open-source journey, one that Chris Wright (pictured), as the senior vice president and chief technology officer of Red Hat and a veteran Linux developer, has seen evolve over more than 20 years as a software engineer.

    “What we’re experiencing in the Linux space is, it’s driving a commoditization of infrastructure,” Wright said. “It’s switching away from the traditional vertically integrated stack of a [reduced instruction set computer]/Unix environment to providing choice. As infrastructure changes, it’s not just hardware, it’s virtualized data centers, it’s public clouds.”

  • Introduction to the Red Hat OpenShift deployment extension for Microsoft Azure DevOps

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