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AMD Zen 3 and Linux

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Linux
Hardware
  • AMD Zen 3 "Family 19h" Enablement Beginning With The Linux 5.6 Kernel

    With the upcoming Linux 5.6 kernel cycle will be the first of many patches to come surrounding AMD Zen 3 "Family 19h" support.

    So far there haven't been any AMD Family 19h patches to the Linux kernel besides k10temp driver support. But queued up ahead of the weekend were a couple changes relating to Zen3/19h beginning to collect in ras/core for the Linux 5.6 merge window kicking off in the next week or two.

  • AMD Zen 3 Microcode Spotted in the Linux Kernel

    AMD Zen 3 microcode has recently been spotted in the Linux kernel, months ahead of the expected launch of this new line of processors.

    The discovery was shared on Twitter by @KOMACHI_ENSAKA, who says the new code is linked with EDAC, or Error Detection and Correction.

    By the looks of things, the Linux kernel is updated to support the AMD Family 19h processors, which represents the new Zen 3-based chip family.

    As the leaker notes, AMD 17h series can still be used, as they’re already supported – Family 17h is the existing AMD Zen 2 series.

AMD Zen 3 Linux update suggests a radically different CPU design

  • AMD Zen 3 Linux update suggests a radically different CPU design to Zen 2

    The new Linux patch details support for Family 19h of AMD’s processor silicon, which is widely assumed to be a reference to the Zen 3 family given that the Family 17h refers to the current Zen 2 CPUs and APUs. As such this is definitely not the Linux code base getting prepped for the Ryzen 4000 APUs that have been launched at CES, but the Ryzen 4000 CPUs being launched, likely around Computex.

    Confusing? Nah, Ryzen 4000 chips are obviously not the same as Ryzen 4000 chips, that would be stupid. Anyways, the new Linux code doesn’t really give us any extra details about the new Zen 3 microarchitecture, beyond providing a pair of different Family 19h CPU device IDs. And those themselves tell us precious little aside from the fact there are AMD Zen 3 chips being prepped for testing.

AMD Includes Zen 3 Microcode In Linux Kernel

  • AMD Includes Zen 3 Microcode In Linux Kernel

    After the success of Zen 2 powered CPUs, Dr. Lisa Su, AMD’s CEO, formally disclosed in his recent interview that AMD is planning to release Zen 3 later this year.

    Additionally, famed Hardware leaker, Komachi Ensaka, also tweeted revealing the line of code added to the Linux kernel for the Family of 19h system, which is the family of AMD CPUs based on the Zen 3 microarchitecture.

AMD's next generation Zen 3 CPU code will be added to the Linux

  • AMD's next generation Zen 3 CPU code will be added to the Linux kernel before 2020 starts

    Aside from something unforeseen and catastrophic, Zen 3 is definitely making its debut this year. We know this because AMD managing director Dr. Lisa Su has already indicated this several times, including in an interview in which she promised that “Big Navi” (Navi 20) would also make its debut in 2020. If anyone needs more evidence on this matter, just turn their attention to the underlying code that is added to the Linux kernel.

    Interestingly, patches for the Linux kernel have been great in the past to point to new hardware before it officially launched. And more recently, updates to the Linux kernel have given references to things like Navi 22 and Navi 23, which are two unpublished Navi GPUs. Now Zen 3 is doing a cameo.

AMD Zen Thermal/Power Reporting Improvements...

  • AMD Zen Thermal/Power Reporting Improvements Could Hit Linux 5.6 But More Testing Needed

    Last week I eagerly reported on Ryzen CPUs on Linux finally seeing CCD temperatures and current/voltage reporting thanks to new patches to the k10temp driver by Google's Guenter Roeck who oversees the kernel's hardware monitoring "HWMON" subsystem. The patches seem to be working well and are tentatively queued in hwmon-next, but more testing is still needed.

AMD's next generation Zen 3 CPU

  • AMD's next generation Zen 3 CPU code will be added to the Linux kernel before 2020 starts

    Aside from something unforeseen and catastrophic, Zen 3 is definitely making its debut this year. We know this because AMD managing director Dr. Lisa Su has already indicated this several times, including in an interview in which she promised that “Big Navi” (Navi 20) would also make its debut in 2020. If anyone needs more evidence on this matter, just turn their attention to the underlying code that is added to the Linux kernel.

    Interestingly, patches for the Linux kernel have been great in the past to point to new hardware before it officially launched. And more recently, updates to the Linux kernel have given references to things like Navi 22 and Navi 23, which are two unpublished Navi GPUs. Now Zen 3 is doing a cameo.

  • Zen 3: AMD’s new architecture microcode surfaced in the Linux kernel

    Despite the fact that it only seems to be yesterday that the Zen 2 chips for the Ryzen 3000 processors were released, we have noted that the Zen 3 is on its way, which shouldn’t be too surprising considering that AMD does everything possible to keep its CPU line up to date every year.

AMD Zen 3 Linux Update To Feature A Very Different CPU Design

We may have just got a peek at AMD Zen 3

  • We may have just got a peek at AMD Zen 3 in this Linux kernel update

    References to Zen 3, the architecture of AMD’s next-gen Ryzen desktop processors, have turned up in the Linux kernel, hinting that these chips might just arrive sooner than we think.

    New versions of the Linux kernel are often combed through as they emerge, looking for clues like references to unreleased hardware, and this time around it’s Komachi_Ensaka (a prolific leaker) who spotted details of AMD’s ‘Family 19h’ processors, and shared them on Twitter.

AMD adds Zen 3 technology to the kernel of Linux

  • AMD ADDS ZEN 3 TECHNOLOGY TO THE KERNEL OF LINUX

    Although it may feel like just yesterday that the Zen2-powered chips came out in the Ryzen 3000-series cpus, we're already catching a lot of wind that Zen 3 is well on its way, which shouldn't be too surprising given that AMD is doing its best to keep its CPU lineup updated annually. Today, as spotted by hardware leaker Komachi, we caught a whiff of Zen 3 microcode being added to Linux kernel.

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