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Like its Windows-noob-stabilisers OS, Zorin's cloudy Grid tool is Linux desktop management for idiots

Zorin, which provides a Linux distro designed to look familiar for migrating Windows and Mac users, has announced a subscription-based management tool for Linux desktops.

Six desktop layouts in Zorin include Windows, macOS, Touch, Ubuntu, and Gnome 3, though the full range is only available in the paid-for Ultimate edition (€39 + VAT). But the free Core edition is fully usable, includes the Windows-like desktop, and most of the software in Ultimate can be added manually. The main reason to purchase Ultimate is for installation support and to help finance the Ireland-based project.

Zorin OS is based on Ubuntu and currently at version 15.1, released in mid-December 2019. There are several variants, including one using the lightweight Xfce desktop for best performance on older hardware. We took a look at version 15 in June last year. New stuff in 15.1 includes version 5.0 of the Linux kernel, the ability to use an Android phone as a remote for presentations, new desktop customisation options, and the inclusion of the Sans Forgetica font, which is deliberately hard to read on the grounds, it is claimed, that you remember things better if the brain puts in more effort.

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Besides the obvious Google Pixel and Nexus devices supported by AOSP (Android Open Source Project), we previously covered some single board computers that were also officially supported by the project with Hikey and Hikey 960 Android reference boards. Linaro Consumer Group (LCG) has just written about Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 based Dragonboard 845c board. It has been now an official Android reference board for a few months now, and it is the first such board with an open-source graphics stack thanks to Freedreno graphics driver and mesa framework. Since no proprietary blobs are required, the board’s full functionality can also be upstreamed into the mainline kernel, and Linaro currently uses the board as a test target for validating the mainline kernel and stable updates. Read more

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My Linux Story: From 8-bit enthusiast to Unix sysadmin

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Devices With GNU/Linux

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    The world is increasingly interconnected and a result of this is the exposure to security vulnerabilities has dramatically increased as well. The intricacies of maintaining today's Linux-based platforms make it very challenging for developers to cover every potential entry point. In 2019 there was an average of more than 45 CVEs logged per day. How does a development organization keep up with that? In order to stay on top of this, developers must increasingly spend more time and effort integrating common vulnerabilities and exposure (CVE) patches into their solutions, at the cost of spending time developing their applications Security attacks come in many forms and use various entry points. Each attack type comes in several flavors, as there is usually more than one way that they can be configured or camouflaged based on the experience, resources, and determination of the hacker. While some threats are more prevalent than others, a developer needs to protect against all vulnerabilities. The following chart shows the increase in CVEs over the last 6 years, and how many of those CVEs actually impact any given distribution.

  • 4K Digital Signage Player Drives up to 4x 4K Displays with AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC

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