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Flatseal Review: Managing Permissions for Flatpak Apps Has Never Been Easier

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If you’ve ever wanted a graphical tool to track and manage basic permissions for Flatpak applications, you should know that there’s now Flatseal.

Flatpak apps are becoming more and more popular these days as they allow you to install certain apps that aren’t available or regularly updated in the software repositories of your GNU/Linux distribution. While they run sandboxed, limited access to the host environment, Flatpak applications require certain permissions.

Tracking and changing these permissions for all of your installed Flatpak apps could become cumbersome or time consuming. Developed by Martin Abente Lahaye, Flatseal features a simple, straightforward design that does exactly what it says on the tin. It presents users with a list of installed Flatpak apps and basic permissions.

By default, the application displays all available permissions for all installed Flatpak apps and which permissions each app requested. Users will be able to inspect all available permissions and grant or deny app permissions for each application.

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Flatseal Makes it Easy to Manage Flatpak Permissions

  • Flatseal Makes it Easy to Manage Flatpak Permissions

    Heavy users of Flatpak apps will appreciate Flatseal, a new GTK app that makes managing Flatpak permissions a lot easier.

    As a sandboxed app format, Flatpak apps have to request individual permission to access different parts of your system or your configured hardware. e.g., permission to access the network, permission to show notifications, permission to read files in you ~/Downloads folder.

    As of GNOME 3.32 it’s possible to manage Flatpak app permissions on a per-app basis using the “Applications” section in System Settings.

Flatseal: Graphical Tool To Manage Flatpak Application Perms

  • Flatseal: Graphical Tool To Manage Flatpak Application Permissions

    Many applications are available to install in Linux desktop via Flatpak packages nowadays. If you’re sticking to flatpak applications, then Flatseal may be useful for you.

    Flatseal is a graphical utility to review and modify basic permissions for all your installed Flatpak applications.

    Simply launch Flatseal, select or search for an application from left pane and modify its permissions. Restart the application after making the changes. If anything goes wrong just press the Reset button.

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