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System76 Just Took Its Thelio Linux PC To Insane New Heights

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Linux

All other desktop CPUs cower in its presence. My mighty Falcon Northwest Talon with its 12-core Ryzen 3900x is weeping in a corner. And don’t even get me started on the “core envy” my own System76 Thelio is feeling right now. I’m of course referring to the insane 64-core Ryzen Threadripper 3990X from AMD, which can now be loaded up in the newly redesigned Thelio Major Linux PC from System76.

Launching new or upgraded systems day-and-date alongside a major component release like the Ryzen Threadripper 3990X is commonplace in the Windows hardware world, but this is a move that simply delights me to see in the Linux ecosystem.

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System76 Launches Impressive Line Of Thelio Major Linux

System76 offer it up with their stylish Thelio Major

  • As AMD launch the monster 3990X CPU, System76 offer it up with their stylish Thelio Major

    Today, AMD officially made the Ryzen Threadripper 3990X available as a seriously high-end desktop processor. Along with that, System76 jumped in right away to give it as an option on their powerful Thelio Major.

    Coming with a huge amount of cores, the Threadripper 3990X certainly isn't cheap in the region of around $3,990/£3,696. For that you get a lot of everything though with 64 cores, 128 threads, PCIe 4.0 support, 32MB L2 cache with a base clock of 2.9GHz up to 4.3GHz boost. It's a monster. For gaming, quite likely serious overkill but if you play games and do plenty of content creation, compiling software and things like that all those cores will obviously come in handy. Nothing like playing a game while all your work is going on in the background eh? Find out more here.

System76 Announces AMD Threadripper Linux Workstations

  • System76 Announces AMD Threadripper Linux Workstations

    System76 is a Denver, Colorado-based American computer manufacturer. They are specializing in the sale of Linux powered laptops, desktops, and servers. Last year System76 announced two Intel laptops with Coreboot, which as an alternative to proprietary BIOS using Intel 10th Gen CPUs. Now, System76 updated its Linux workstations line and ship with the latest AMD chips for CPU-intensive workloads. But how much of a difference can 64 cores AMD CPU make?

System76 'Thelio Major' Ubuntu Linux desktop gets jaw-dropping

  • System76 'Thelio Major' Ubuntu Linux desktop gets jaw-dropping 64-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 3990X option

    If you are a Linux user that craves lots of processing power, you are undoubtedly familiar with System76's popular line of Thelio desktops. Hell, you have either already bought one of these computers or you daydream about owning one. These Thelio desktops are made in the USA, housed in a custom wooden chassis, and come with Ubuntu Linux or System76's own Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS operating system pre-installed. Thelio is what dreams are made of...

    Depending on the model of Thelio you choose, you can get either Intel or AMD processors. While the standard Thelio model can be had with regular AMD Ryzen processors, the Thelio Major can be configured with Ryzen Threadripper chips. If you aren't familiar, Threadripper processors are multi-core beasts that are designed for hardcore users.

System76 Launches New AMD Threadripper Machine

  • System76 Launches New AMD Threadripper Machine

    System76 has added an AMD Threadripper option for their Thelio desktop lineup.

    The most successful retailer of Linux-based desktops, laptops, and servers has announced a new addition to their popular Thelio desktop lineup. The new option, part of the Thelio Major model, adds AMD’s 64 Core Threadripper 3990X CPU into the mix. This system can compile the Linux kernel in 24 seconds, apply a circular motion blur in 44 seconds, and render a Blender scene in 76 seconds. That’s incredibly fast.

    The Threadripper Thelio Major has been optimized for the heat produced by the 280 watt, 64-Core CPU, which was a serious undertaking. System76 accomplished the task by using a 5.5" duct that pulls air from inside the system, directs it across a heat sink, and then (drawing the heated air through copper piping) sends it out of the machine through the rear. This method compartmentalized the GPU and CPU heat sources as well as the air that is used to cool the individual chips.

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