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Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS released

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Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS
(Long-Term Support) for its Desktop, Server, and Cloud products, as well
as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support.

Like previous LTS series, 18.04.4 includes hardware enablement stacks
for use on newer hardware. This support is offered on all architectures
and is installed by default when using one of the desktop images.

Ubuntu Server defaults to installing the GA kernel; however you may
select the HWE kernel from the installer bootloader.

As usual, this point release includes many updates, and updated
installation media has been provided so that fewer updates will need to
be downloaded after installation. These include security updates and
corrections for other high-impact bugs, with a focus on maintaining
stability and compatibility with Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

Read more

Also: Download Now: Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 5.3

Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released With The Newest Hardware Enablement Stack

Lubuntu 18.04.4 Released!

  • Lubuntu 18.04.4 Released!

    Thanks to all the hard work from our contributors, we are pleased to announce that Lubuntu 18.04.4 LTS has been released! Lubuntu is an official Ubuntu flavor which uses the Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment (LXDE). The project’s goal is to provide a lightweight yet functional Linux distribution based on a rock solid Ubuntu base. Lubuntu specifically targets older machines with lower resources, but also runs great on newer hardware. Along with a simple but usable graphical user interface, Lubuntu comes with a wide variety of applications chosen for their small footprint so you can browse, email, chat, play, and be productive.

Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 5.3, Download Now

  • Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Released with Linux Kernel 5.3, Download Now

    Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS comes exactly six months after Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS, adding up-to-date components, as well as all the latest security fixes for those who want to install a fresh copy of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS “Bionic Beaver” operating system with more recent kernel and graphics stacks.

    What’s more important in the Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS release is that it comes with fresh new kernel and graphics stacks for better hardware support, Linux kernel 5.3 and X.Org Server 1.20.5, from Ubuntu 19.10 “Eoan Ermine.” In comparison, Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS shipped with Linux kernel 5.0 from the now deprecated Ubuntu 19.04 “Disco Dingo” release.

Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS released Wednesday—here’s what’s new

  • Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS released Wednesday—here’s what’s new

    This Wednesday, the current Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Service) release—Bionic Beaver—launched its fourth maintenance update.

    Ubuntu is one of the most predictable operating system distributions in terms of its release cycle—a new version is launched in April and October of each year. Most of these are interim releases, supported for a single year from launch; but the April release of each even-numbered year is an LTS, supported for five years. LTS releases also get maintenance releases as necessary, typically about every three to six months during the support cycle of the LTS.

Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Now Available for Download

  • Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu 18.04.4 LTS Now Available for Download

    Known as Bionic Beaver, Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS comes alongside all the other flavors that are based on this system, including Kubuntu and Xubuntu (you can find the full list, along with links to their release notes, in the box after the jump).

    Just as expected, the new release comes with all the patches and security fixes included in the latest updates, and given it’s an LTS version, it’s specifically focused on stability and compatibility going forward.

A new Ubuntu Linux LTS is now available

  • A new Ubuntu Linux LTS is now available

    There are two types of Ubuntu users -- brave ones willing to use bleeding edge variants of the Linux-based operating system, and weak ones that stick with the Long Term Support versions. Of course I am just kidding; there is absolutely nothing wrong with using LTS variants of Ubuntu. In fact, it is actually quite wise -- especially for business users -- since it focuses on stability and compatibility. Even home users should probably stick with LTS, as long support can be preferable to having the new "shiny" version. Personally, I like to go with whatever is the newest -- support length be damned -- but I digress.

    Now, Canonical is releasing the newest version of its LTS Linux-based operating system -- Ubuntu Linux 18.04.4. Yeah, it is just a point release, and not 20.04 LTS (which will arrive in April), but still, it would be a good idea to update your installation media. It isn't just the normal version of Ubuntu being updated -- which uses the GNOME desktop environment -- but other flavors too. For instance, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu, and Ubuntu Budgie are all being bumped up to 18.04.4.

Ubuntu 18.04.4 Released with Kernel 5.3 [How-to Install]

  • Ubuntu 18.04.4 Released with Kernel 5.3 [How-to Install]

    The fourth point release Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS was released. Here’s how to install the new Linux Kernel 5.3 and Xorg in your current Ubuntu 18.04 machine.

    Ubuntu 18.04.4 comes with an updated “hardware enablement stack” (HWE) from Ubuntu 19.10, including Kernel 5.3 that enables the latest hardware and peripherals available from IBM, Intel, and others.

Canonical pushes fourth point release for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

  • Canonical pushes fourth point release for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Canonical has announced the availability of Ubuntu 18.04.4 LTS. The new update is a point release which rolls all of the latest updates into a single disc image saving you time when you do a clean install as you have fewer updates to install. Also, this update includes hardware enablement stacks which adds support for newer hardware.

    The new point release is available for Ubuntu on Desktop, Server, and the Cloud as well as other flavours of Ubuntu with long-term support including Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, and Xubuntu. Detailed release notes for each of these flavours can be found on the Ubuntu Wiki.

    Each Ubuntu LTS release ships with five years of maintenance updates, this means that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS will reach end-of-life around April or May 2021. If you’re still using this older release, Canonical will offer you an automatic upgrade to 18.04.4 via the Update Manager, you can find detailed instructions for upgrading here.

Canonical have announced a new point release for Ubuntu 18.04

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