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6 Less Popular Enterprise Linux Distributions

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Linux

There are some special Linux distributions that we call Enterprise Distributions; Those are the distributions that are commercially supported to possibly fit a specific or multiple enterprise goals in the market. For example, large telecommunications companies like AT&T or even your local ISP most likely can’t develop all their software solutions by their selves, and above that, they need support in order to set up their infrastructure. That’s where those enterprise Linux distributions come to the picture. They provide a specific set of software for those companies (Small, medium & large ones) with the support they need to get the job done. In most of the times you can get the distribution itself for free, but for support, you have to pay $$$.

We won’t talk about the famous enterprise Linux distributions such as Red Hat, SUSE or Oracle Linux, because most of you already know about them. Instead, in today’s article, we’ll introduce 6 less popular enterprise Linux distributions for you.

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