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Firefox 73 Is Now Available for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

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Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, on February 11th, the Firefox 73 open-source web browser introduces various enhancement to make your browsing experience more enjoyable. Among these improvements, we can mention the ability to add a custom default zoom level that applies to all web content.

Firefox comes with a 100% zoom level by default, but now it can be changed to whatever suits your needs thanks to a new “Default zoom” dropdown menu implemented in the Zoom section under “Language and Appearance” settings.

Read more

On Firefox Containers

  • What Are Firefox Containers and Why Every Browser Needs Them

    Browser makers are working hard to build new privacy features that would protect users when surfing the web, and up to this point, Mozilla seems to be one of the innovators when it comes to such capabilities bundled with browsers.

    Mozilla has launched a so-called Multi-Account Containers add-on that technically enables Firefox to separate web browsing into containers where users connect to various accounts online.

    In just a few words, the purpose of this feature is to allow a better online account separation, technically blocking websites from reading each other’s data. Each container comes with its very own storage and cookies, and more importantly, such content can only be read by the website loaded in that container.

IDG on Firefox

  • What's in the latest Firefox update? Firefox 73 adds to usability and accessibility options

    Mozilla this week released Firefox 73, a minor upgrade whose most notable addition was a new default setting for page zooming.

    Software engineers working on the open-source browser also patched six vulnerabilities, half of them labeled "High," Mozilla's second-most-serious threat rating. As usual, some of the flaws might be used by criminals.

    "We presume that with enough effort some of these could have been exploited to run arbitrary code," the firm wrote of two of the bugs.

    Firefox 73 can be downloaded for Windows, macOS and Linux from Mozilla's site. Because Firefox updates in the background, most users need only relaunch the browser to get the latest version. To manually update on Windows, pull up the menu under the three horizontal bars at the upper right, then click the help icon (the question mark within a circle). Choose "About Firefox." (On macOS, "About Firefox" can be found under the "Firefox" menu.) The resulting page shows that the browser is either up to date or describes the refresh process.

    Mozilla last upgraded the browser on Jan. 7, or five weeks ago.

Firefox 73.0.1 Fixes Linux Crashes When Playing Encrypted

  • Firefox 73.0.1 Fixes Linux Crashes When Playing Encrypted Content

    Firefox 73.0.1 arrives a week after the launch of Firefox 73.0 to address a few issues reported by users. These include fixes for a bug that made Firefox to crash on some Linux users when playing encrypted content and an issue which forced Firefox to close unexpectedly when the user exits the Print Preview mode.

    Some users also reported intermittent blank page issues when attempting to log in to the RBC Royal Bank website, so this is now fixed as well in the Firefox 73.0.1 release. Also addressed are a couple of issues reported by users on Windows systems, which shouldn’t affect Linux users.

DRM Issues

  • Firefox 73.0.1 Released With Fixes for Linux, Windows Crashes

    Mozilla has released Firefox 73.0.1 today, February 18th, 2020, to the Stable desktop channel for Windows, macOS, and Linux with crash fixes for users of Windows and Linux devices.

    This release also fixes a loss of browser functionality in certain circumstances and RBC Royal Bank website connectivity problems.

    Windows, Mac, and Linux desktop users can upgrade to Firefox 73.0.1 by going to Options -> Help -> About Firefox and the browser will automatically check for the new update and install it when available.

Mozilla Firefox 73.0.1 Released with Critical Linux Fixes

  • Mozilla Firefox 73.0.1 Released with Critical Linux Fixes

    With this update, Firefox reaches version 73.0.1, and the most notable improvement concerns Linux devices.

    According to the official release notes (embedded at the end of the article), this new update fixes crashes experienced on some Linux systems when playing encrypted content.

Firefox 73.0.1 fixes crashes

  • Firefox 73.0.1 fixes crashes, blank web pages and DRM niggles

    Firefox version 73 has only been out for a week but already Mozilla has had to update it to version 73.0.1 to fix a range of browser problems and crashes, including when running on Linux machines.

    The list of issues is surprisingly long for a point release but, in most cases, the issues only happen in specific contexts. Despite this, some of the issues are still said to have affected “numerous” users, prompting the rapid update.

    Many reports noted Firefox would stop or hesitate when visiting websites or trying to open the internal about:config page, particularly when running in Windows 7 compatibility mode.

    Customers of the Royal Bank of Canada (RBC) found they were ending up with a blank page when logging in while others found the browser would exit when leaving Print Preview mode.

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