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OpenShift, Kubernetes and Expensive IBM Hardware

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Red Hat
Hardware
  • Integrating IBM Z and LinuxONE into the Red Hat OpenShift developer ecosystem

    My role at IBM is to make sure that we’re equipping developers with the tools and resources you need, along with the selection and guard rails you prefer, to help you focus your efforts entirely on innovation. Security is key to unlocking the true value of the cloud, and we want that to be one less thing you have to worry about when you’re building high-performance solutions. To that end, this week we announced a major milestone furthering Kubernetes support for Linux on IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE: The Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform for Linux on IBM Z and LinuxONE is now generally available.

  • March 5 webinar: Introducing Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Z

    Organizations aim to innovate faster and deploy applications more efficiently through cloud-native development — and they expect these applications to protect their data, scale smoothly, and be always available. Now you can meet all of these expectations by combining the leading container and Kubernetes application platform with the leading enterprise computing platform: Red Hat OpenShift on IBM Z.

    Join the upcoming webinar on March 5 to discover what happens when cloud native meets enterprise computing. You’ll learn how the agility of OpenShift, the security and scalability of IBM Z, and the containerized software of IBM Cloud Paks enable business innovation through cloud-native applications on mission-critical IT infrastructure.

  • IBM and Red Hat bring OpenShift to IBM Z and LinuxONE

    One of the things we often assume with the Red Hat OpenShift platform, and with Kubernetes in general, is that our users have computing needs that always fit inside a standard cloud node. While this is definitely the case for most cloud-based applications, there are plenty of non-JavaScript-and-Redis style applications out there that still need to move into the cloud. Some enterprise applications were written before the cloud existed, and still others were created before JavaScript, C#, and Python even existed. Older systems written in languages, like PL/I and COBOL, can also benefit from the move to cloud, and from the use of containers, they just need a little extra attention to make the transition. Sometimes, they might need more specifically tailored environments than are available in the commodity-hardware-based clouds.

    Or maybe, those systems need to also run extremely large, mission-critical databases, like IBM DB2. In order to unlock the true potential of a multi-cloud compute environment, that cloud software needs to run on a diverse array of hardware similar to what is already in place in some of the world’s largest enterprises and governments offices. Spreading cloud capabilities into these larger systems enables containers to exist in the same environment as the company’s central database, and to embrace and modernize those older applications that may still run the most the basic aspects of a business’ day-to-day operations.

Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Now Available For IBM Z

  • Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform Now Available For IBM Z, LinuxONE

    Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform is now available for IBM Z and IBM LinuxONE. OpenShift brings together the core open source technologies of Linux, containers and Kubernetes, adds additional open source capabilities such developer tools and a registry, and hardens, tests and optimizes the software for enterprise production use.

    As IBM puts it, the availability of OpenShift for Z and LinuxONE is a major milestone for both hybrid multicloud and for enterprise computing.

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More in Tux Machines

Openwashing and Corona

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    Let me explain why I cover some proprietary software here and how it can actually help people discover the power of open source.

  • People Are Open-Sourcing Their Patents and Research to Fight Coronavirus

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    Participants are asked to publicly take the pledge by announcing it on their own websites and issuing a press release.

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Software Releases: PyPy 7.3.1, man-pages-5.0, Skrooge 2.22.1

  • PyPy 7.3.1 released

    The interpreters are based on much the same codebase, thus the multiple release. This is a micro release, no APIs have changed since the 7.3.0 release in December, but read on to find out what is new. Conda Forge now supports PyPy as a Python interpreter. The support right now is being built out. After this release, many more c-extension-based packages can be successfully built and uploaded. This is the result of a lot of hard work and good will on the part of the Conda Forge team. A big shout out to them for taking this on. We have worked with the Python packaging group to support tooling around building third party packages for Python, so this release updates the pip and setuptools installed when executing pypy -mensurepip to pip>=20. This completes the work done to update the PEP 425 python tag from pp373 to mean “PyPy 7.3 running python3” to pp36 meaning “PyPy running Python 3.6” (the format is recommended in the PEP). The tag itself was changed in 7.3.0, but older pip versions build their own tag without querying PyPy. This means that wheels built for the previous tag format will not be discovered by pip from this version, so library authors should update their PyPy-specific wheels on PyPI.

  • man-pages-5.04 is released

    I've released man-pages-5.04. The release tarball is available on kernel.org. The browsable online pages can be found on man7.org. The Git repository for man-pages is available on kernel.org. This release resulted from patches, bug reports, reviews, and comments from 15 contributors. The release includes approximately 80 commits that change just under 30 pages.

  • Skrooge 2.22.1 released

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Norbert Preining: TeX Live 2020 released

Due to COVID-19, DVD production will be delayed, but we have decided to release the current image and update the net installer. The .iso image is available on CTAN, and the net installer will pull all the newest stuff. Currently we are working on getting those packages updated during the freeze to the newest level in TeX Live. Read more

Server: OpenSMTPD and Dovecot, Containers and Kubernetes

  • Setting up an email server in 2020 with OpenSMTPD and Dovecot

    So, you want to set up your own email server? In that case, welcome.

    There are many reasons to run a custom email server, ranging from privacy concerns about providers like Google, to just wanting to do it for fun and/or learning. Since you're here, I assume you've already found a reason.

    Beware: this is a messy topic, and the available documentation is even messier, so it could take a while before you get it to work properly. I've compiled this guide according to my experiences in an attempt to make this dark art more accessible, but your mileage may vary considerably. I hope you find it useful.

  • Docker's Compose specification is now an open standard

    Docker Compose, the system created by Docker to define multi-container applications, is now to be developed as an open standard. The Compose Specification, as the new standard is called, is meant to allow Compose-created apps to work on other multi-container definition systems on platforms such as Kubernetes and Amazon Elastic Container Service.

  • How Kubernetes saved my desktop application

    Recently, fellow Opensource.com scribe James Farrell wrote a wonderful article entitled How Ansible brought peace to my home. In addition to the great article, I really liked the title, one of those unexpected phrases that I’m sure brought a smile to many faces. I recently had a weird but positive experience of my own that begs a similar sort of unexpected label. I’ve been grappling with a difficult problem that arose when upgrading some server and networking infrastructure that broke a Java application I’ve been supporting since the early 2000s. Strangely enough, I found the solution in what appears to be a very informative and excellent article on Kubernetes, of all things.