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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • The 20 Best PHP Frameworks for Modern Developers in 2020

    Programming languages encompass the tech world, and we, living in the 21st century, are seeing a historical change. As we all know, these languages are widely used for developing various apps, mobile phone system, etc. and thereby, the demand for these is increasing rapidly over time among developers. Among the different scripting dialects, the language which has secured practically 80% of the site market and tech world is PHP. PHP is utilized to fabricate sites and web applications. The use of PHP frameworks improves the intricate procedure of development by giving a stage where the engineers can work without much of a stretch form PHP applications in the briefest time conceivable.

  • A new hash algorithm for Git

    The Git source-code management system is famously built on the SHA‑1 hashing algorithm, which has become an increasingly weak foundation over the years. SHA‑1 is now considered to be broken and, despite the fact that it does not yet seem to be so broken that it could be used to compromise Git repositories, users are increasingly worried about its security. The good news is that work on moving Git past SHA‑1 has been underway for some time, and is slowly coming to fruition; there is a version of the code that can be looked at now.

  • Git commit reordering

    While I was working for a presentation for kid’s school at Magnetic field, Aurora, Lunar Phases and Rockets, I added 4 big videos to the presentation (as I was going to use them offline while presenting).

    I know what git is not the place for big binary files, and even Github proposed to use the LFS backend for that, but as it was just temporary, I went ahead.

    After that commit, I also wrote two more articles, the one on Lego Speed Champions and the one on Galleria.io and PhotoSwipe, so it became a problem to have big files in between, when my plan was to remove them in the end.

  • Qt World Summit 2019 talk videos are online

    Were you there, but you couldn’t attend that talk or two that you really wanted to see because the conference was so, so packed with awesome content?

    Fear no more! We are glad to announce that the talks at the past Qt World Summit 2019 in Berlin (or QtWS19, for the friends) have been video recorded and are now available online! You can now catch up with the latest news, improvements and best practices around Qt and its ecosystem, all from the comfort of your sofa office chair.

    We have gathered all the talks given by KDAB engineers on this summary page, where you can find also more information about the contents of each talk and download the slides.

  • OpenBLAS 0.3.8 Brings More AVX2/AVX512 Kernels, Other Optimizations

    For those using OpenBLAS as your BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms) implementation, OpenBLAS 0.3.8 was released this weekend and coming with it are more AVX2/AVX-512 kernels and other optimizations.

    OpenBLAS continues striving to compete with Intel's MKL and other optimized BLAS implementations and with more AVX2 and AVX-512 should help with the performance on the latest Intel and AMD CPUs. There is now an AVX-512 DGEMM kernel, the AVX-512 SGEMM kernel was "significantly" improved, and new AVX-512 optimized kernels for CGEMM and ZGEMM. On the AVX2 front the kernels for STRMM, SGEMM, and CGEMM are said to have been significantly sped-up along with new kernels for CGEMM3M and ZGEMM3M.

  • Egad not more PAWs posts Sad

    Well back on my PAWS run again. This one might be a rather short series as I am really just looking at one Action in the Kinesis API 'SubscribeToShard'. There is an open bug for this one up on github https://github.com/pplu/aws-sdk-perl/issues/371 and one I think I can fix up fairly eaisy.

    First things first, a little word on Kinesis. Well in short it touted as a very scalable real time data-stream thingy that sings dances and basically makes you line much better. Myself I do not havea use for it but it is part of the system and there is a bug so in I go.

    I first had to set things up on the AWS server side with some permission etc the usualal srtuff I also had to run a number of command top build up my Kineses system to a point where I can actually use the 'SubscribeToShard'

  • Important Changes in YAML::PP v0.019

    During the SUSE Hackweek 19 I found time to fix some bugs and make important changes in YAML::PP.

    Some of these changes might break code, but I expect this will be rare.

    As I see more and more CPAN modules using YAML::PP, I decided to make these changes as soon as possible.

    I will explain all changes and the reasons.

  • Introducing KBOS

    Starting even before Moose, we (in the Perl 5 world) have a plethora of Modules extending the syntax of the language with Perl 6 and more in mind. The following article sums up not only my 2 and a half cents on the subject but also an attempt to implement it. It should be of interest to anybody thinking about programming in general.

    As many here know, Kephra is the project closest to my heart and during the latest iteration, I decided to extend the language itself to get a more expressive, less repetitive code base. I want a fast, extendable type system with helpful error messages, real private attributes, real private methods, signatures with typed, positional, named and optional arguments, relaxed professional error handling, I want to know all instances of a class, reuse by delegation and incorporate any foreign objects. Last not least should the system support me in marshalling all attributes, so I can fully restore a program state after restart or switch into a remote session / other window.

    The Kephra Base Object System (KBOS - read: ok boss) is designed to deliver on all that and I just want to discuss here my decisions. Some seem to be strange, like no inheritance (a feature), class types (not even Raku has them) or 4 different method scopes. But hej its my pile of garbage, stay away. I want this to become the optimal object system for Kephra's needs. It is not clear to me if I will release it or parts as a separate distribution in future.

  • Postponing some feature removals in Python 3.9

    Python 2 was officially "retired" on the last day of 2019, so no bugs will be fixed or changes made in that version of the language, at least by the core developers—distributions and others will continue for some time to come. But there are lots of Python projects that still support Python 2.7 and may not be ready for an immediate clean break. Some changes that were made for the upcoming Python 3.9 release (which is currently scheduled for October) are causing headaches because support for long-deprecated 2.7-compatibility features is being dropped. That led to a discussion on the python-dev mailing list about postponing those changes to give a bit more time to projects that want to drop Python 2.7 support soon, but not immediately.

    There will actually be one final release of Python 2, Python 2.7.18, in April. It is something of a celebratory release that will be made in conjunction with PyCon. There were some fixes that accumulated in the branch between the 2.7.17 release in October and the end of the year, so those fixes will be flushed and the branch retired. Other than the release itself, no other changes will be allowed for that branch in 2020.

  • SUSE Hack Week Spotlight: Guerrilla AI Team

    SUSE Hack Week is a week-long sprint permitting developers time off from their day jobs to work on something entirely of their own design or wishes. This week we will be showcasing some of the amazing projects coming out of SUSE Hack Week and the brilliant minds behind them. Stay tuned all week long for more features.

More in Tux Machines

Compact, Linux-based computer extends I/O of networked systems

Aitech’s compact, rugged “A174” computer can extend the I/O of multiple network-connected computers. The avionics focused A174 runs Linux on a Cyclone V SoC and provides I/O including serial, analog, discrete, ARINC-429, and more. Aitech’s FPGA-enabled A174 I/O expansion subsystem is designed as a companion computer for one or more avionics computers, but it can be used with any rugged embedded system to extend I/O and offload I/O processing. The system’s multiple-client/multiple-server architecture enables multiple A174 devices to act as I/O servers to multiple clients. Read more

The 15 Best Cinnamon Themes for Linux System in 2020

Linux Mint is an excellent community-driven Linux distro based on Ubuntu. It is very popular among beginners because Linux Mint is very easy to use. Though it has Debian in its core, the user interface is quite modern and beautiful. It is mostly because of its default desktop environment Cinnamon. This open-source desktop environment can be used on other Linux distributions. Cinnamon is almost similar to Xfce and GNOME 2 because of its conservative design model. But since its release in 2011, it has got huge coverage because of its ease-of-use. The active developer community of Cinnamon is relentlessly developing amazing Cinnamon themes for the mass users. These Linux Mint themes can change your desktop and create such a gorgeous look. Read more

today's leftovers

  • QQ for Linux 2.0 Beta2 Released with Stability Improvements

    QQ for Linux, the popular instant messaging apps developed by Tencent, released the second Beta on April Fools’ Day. The development of QQ on Linux is quite slow. It has been 5 months since the last release.

  • LibreOffice's extension Formatting of All Math Formulas 0.1.9 is released

    We have updated our extension Formatting of All Math Formulas to 0.1.9 version. The extension allows you to change font and font size for all (or only for selected) Math formulas in your Writer, Calc, Draw or Impress document for one time.

  • Foundation is now close to Catalina compatibility

    I have worked hard to get it to this point, but all of the classes in Catalina are now present in GNUstep's base implementation. Soon, all of the classes available in AppKit will also be available in GNUstep's GUI implementation.

  • Bassel Khartabil Fellowship Awarded to Tarek Loubani—Using Open Access to Combat COVID-19

    The Fellowship award will allow Loubani to Combat COVID-19 through the release of Open Access plans for medical hardware, so that vital equipment may be produced cheaply by anyone with commonly available 3D printers. Loubani’s approach enables high quality devices to be made available during periods of global supply chain disruption, and in areas with limited access. Glia has released face shields already being used in the battle against COVID-19, as well as other hardware including stethoscopes, tourniquets, and otoscopes. Additional devices including pulse oximeters, electrocardiograms, and dialysis products are currently in development. See the full press release for more information about Loubani’s work and how the fellowship will support his efforts.

  • Code Search for Google open source projects

    We are pleased to launch Code Search for Google open source projects. Code Search is one of Google’s most popular internal tools, and now we have a version (same binary, different flags) targeted to open source communities. Googlers use Code Search every day to help understand the codebase: they search for half-remembered functions and usages; jump through the codebase to figure out what calls the function they are viewing; and try to identify when and why a particular line of code changed. The Code Search tool gives a rich code browsing experience. For example, the blame button shows which user last changed each line and you can display history on the same page as the file contents. In addition, it supports a powerful search language and, for some repositories, cross-references.

  • Google Opens Code Search For Angular, Dart, TensorFlow And More

    Google has announced the launch of Code Search for its popular open source projects — Angular, Bazel, Dart, ExoPlayer, Firebase SDK, Flutter, Go, gVisor, Kythe, Nomulus, Outline, and Tensorflow.

  • The Linux Foundation to Award 500 Training Scholarships
  • OpenDaylight Magnesium Advances Open Source Software Defined Networking

    On March 31, the OpenDaylight Magnesium release became generally available marking the 12th release of the open source Software Defined Networking (SDN) controller platform. The OpenDaylight project was officially announced in April 2013 with a long list of marquee sponsor all focused on the goal of creating an open source SDN controller. OpenDaylight has two releases in any given year, with Magnesium following up the Sodium and Neon releases from 2019. As is often the case, there are updates to existing projects as well as the addition of new projects in the Magnesium release. OpenDaylight is a platform that is comprised of multiple modular component project that users can choose to mix and match in different configurations as needed.

  • Strange Times: During The COVID-19 Outbreak, Evictions Get A Pause...In Final Fantasy 14

    As the world navigates the reality of the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic, we've already noted several ways that the outbreak has changed our daily lives. Me being me, I noticed just how many professional sports organizations were moving into broadcast versions of their eSports as a way to fill the void. That of course isn't the only way video game life has changed.

  • Cellar Door Games have officially announced Rogue Legacy 2

    Rogue Legacy 2 from Cellar Door Games is a "genealogical" rogue-lite following the popular gameplay idea from the original, where you die and pass on your skills and continue to grow through new characters. While there's currently no platforms mentioned for release since they've only just begun teasing it (there's not even a trailer yet), it's likely it will come to Linux since both the original Rogue Legacy and Cellar Door's other title Full Metal Furies were on Linux and they were ported by Ethan Lee.

  • X-Plane 11.50 has a first Beta with Vulkan API support which should improve performance

    X-Plane 11 is a very highly rated flight simulation game and Laminar Research have been working on advancing the graphics side of it, with a first Beta out for the next version with Vulkan support. Announced on their official blog yesterday, Laminar mentioned that had 50+ third-party developers do plenty of private testing for them but as this is the first public Beta it will likely have some issues. For the Linux version any Linux distribution that can run recent GPU drivers should be fine, with any somewhat recent GPU that supports Vulkan. On the NVIDIA side you need at least driver version 440.26 but Mesa version for AMD was not mentioned (Intel seems not supported).

Python Programming

  • Split String in Python

    When a string of multiple words is divided into the specific number of words based on a particular separator then it is called string splitting. Most of the programming languages use the split() method to divide a string into multiple words. The return type of this method is an array for many standard programming languages. the split() method is used in Python also to divide a string into words and it returns a list of words based on the separator. How to split() method can be used in Python is shown in this article by using different examples. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and execute the python script.

  • Send and receive UDP packets via Python

    We already know about two main transport layer protocols like TCP and UDP. For more information about TCP and UDP you can check reference section. In this article we will learn how to send and receive UDP packets using python program.

  • The 7 most popular ways to plot data in Python

    "How do I make plots in Python?" used to have a simple answer: Matplotlib was the only way. Nowadays, Python is the language of data science, and there's a lot more choice. What should you use? This guide will help you decide. It will show you how to use each of the four most popular Python plotting libraries—Matplotlib, Seaborn, Plotly, and Bokeh—plus a couple of great up-and-comers to consider: Altair, with its expressive API, and Pygal, with its beautiful SVG output. I'll also look at the very convenient plotting API provided by pandas. For each library, I've included source code snippets, as well as a full web-based example using Anvil, our platform for building web apps with nothing but Python. Let's take a look.

  • Episode 3: Effective Python and Python at Google Scale

    In this episode, Christopher interviews Brett Slatkin about the 2nd edition of his book Effective Python. Brett talks about the revisions he made for the book, and updating it for the newest versions of Python 3. Christopher asks who is the intended developer for the book. Brett also discusses working on Google App Engine, and what it’s like to develop and maintain Python applications at Google Scale. Brett mentions a brief anecdote about working with Guido van Rossum, while they both worked at Google. He also provides advice about maintaining a large and aging Python code base.

  • Randy Zwitch: Building pyarrow with CUDA support

    The other day I was looking to read an Arrow buffer on GPU using Python, but as far as I could tell, none of the provided pyarrow packages on conda or pip are built with CUDA support. Like many of the packages in the compiled-C-wrapped-by-Python ecosystem, Apache Arrow is thoroughly documented, but the number of permutations of how you could choose to build pyarrow with CUDA support quickly becomes overwhelming. In this post, I’ll show how to build pyarrow with CUDA support on Ubuntu using Docker and virtualenv. These directions are approximately the same as the official Apache Arrow docs, just that I explain them step-by-step and show only the single build toolchain I used.

  • Python String Formatting

    The string Formatting is a very important task of any type of programming language. It helps the user to understand the output of the script properly. The string formatting can be done in Python in various ways, such as using ‘%’ symbol, format() method, string interpolation, etc. This article shows how the string data can be formatted in Python by using different string formatting methods. Spyder3 editor is used here to write and run the script. Two types of formatting parameters can be used in Python. These are positional parameters and keyword parameters. The parameter which is accessed by the index is called the positional parameter and the parameter which is accessed by key is called the keyword parameter. The uses of these parameters are shown in the next part of this article.

  • 30 Days Of Python | Day 3 Project: A Simple Earnings Calculator

    Welcome to the first mini project in the 30 Days of Python series. For this project we're going to be creating a simple console application that will help an employer calculate an employee's earning in a given week. [...] Once you've written your program, you shouldn't be worried if it looks a little bit different to ours. You might have chosen different variable names or prompts, or you might have used a slightly different approach to us. This is absolutely fine. There are often may different ways to write even very short programs like this.

  • When to use the Clean Architecture?

    There are few possible reactions after learning about the Clean Architecture or Hexagonal Architecture (AKA Ports & Adapters) or even merely innocent service layer in Django. Some developers are enthusiastic and try to apply these techniques immediately, some are hesitant, full of doubts. The rest is strongly opposing, declaring openly this is an abomination. Then they say we already have excellent tools, like Django. Then they argue others don’t know about the advanced features of common tools. Then they call you Java developer in disguise. As a speaker and an author of the book Implementing the Clean Architecture , I have faced all the reactions from this spectrum. What two extremes fail to do, is to ask the right question – WHEN? When the Clean Architecture should be used?