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Programming Leftovers

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Development
  • The 20 Best PHP Frameworks for Modern Developers in 2020

    Programming languages encompass the tech world, and we, living in the 21st century, are seeing a historical change. As we all know, these languages are widely used for developing various apps, mobile phone system, etc. and thereby, the demand for these is increasing rapidly over time among developers. Among the different scripting dialects, the language which has secured practically 80% of the site market and tech world is PHP. PHP is utilized to fabricate sites and web applications. The use of PHP frameworks improves the intricate procedure of development by giving a stage where the engineers can work without much of a stretch form PHP applications in the briefest time conceivable.

  • A new hash algorithm for Git

    The Git source-code management system is famously built on the SHA‑1 hashing algorithm, which has become an increasingly weak foundation over the years. SHA‑1 is now considered to be broken and, despite the fact that it does not yet seem to be so broken that it could be used to compromise Git repositories, users are increasingly worried about its security. The good news is that work on moving Git past SHA‑1 has been underway for some time, and is slowly coming to fruition; there is a version of the code that can be looked at now.

  • Git commit reordering

    While I was working for a presentation for kid’s school at Magnetic field, Aurora, Lunar Phases and Rockets, I added 4 big videos to the presentation (as I was going to use them offline while presenting).

    I know what git is not the place for big binary files, and even Github proposed to use the LFS backend for that, but as it was just temporary, I went ahead.

    After that commit, I also wrote two more articles, the one on Lego Speed Champions and the one on Galleria.io and PhotoSwipe, so it became a problem to have big files in between, when my plan was to remove them in the end.

  • Qt World Summit 2019 talk videos are online

    Were you there, but you couldn’t attend that talk or two that you really wanted to see because the conference was so, so packed with awesome content?

    Fear no more! We are glad to announce that the talks at the past Qt World Summit 2019 in Berlin (or QtWS19, for the friends) have been video recorded and are now available online! You can now catch up with the latest news, improvements and best practices around Qt and its ecosystem, all from the comfort of your sofa office chair.

    We have gathered all the talks given by KDAB engineers on this summary page, where you can find also more information about the contents of each talk and download the slides.

  • OpenBLAS 0.3.8 Brings More AVX2/AVX512 Kernels, Other Optimizations

    For those using OpenBLAS as your BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms) implementation, OpenBLAS 0.3.8 was released this weekend and coming with it are more AVX2/AVX-512 kernels and other optimizations.

    OpenBLAS continues striving to compete with Intel's MKL and other optimized BLAS implementations and with more AVX2 and AVX-512 should help with the performance on the latest Intel and AMD CPUs. There is now an AVX-512 DGEMM kernel, the AVX-512 SGEMM kernel was "significantly" improved, and new AVX-512 optimized kernels for CGEMM and ZGEMM. On the AVX2 front the kernels for STRMM, SGEMM, and CGEMM are said to have been significantly sped-up along with new kernels for CGEMM3M and ZGEMM3M.

  • Egad not more PAWs posts Sad

    Well back on my PAWS run again. This one might be a rather short series as I am really just looking at one Action in the Kinesis API 'SubscribeToShard'. There is an open bug for this one up on github https://github.com/pplu/aws-sdk-perl/issues/371 and one I think I can fix up fairly eaisy.

    First things first, a little word on Kinesis. Well in short it touted as a very scalable real time data-stream thingy that sings dances and basically makes you line much better. Myself I do not havea use for it but it is part of the system and there is a bug so in I go.

    I first had to set things up on the AWS server side with some permission etc the usualal srtuff I also had to run a number of command top build up my Kineses system to a point where I can actually use the 'SubscribeToShard'

  • Important Changes in YAML::PP v0.019

    During the SUSE Hackweek 19 I found time to fix some bugs and make important changes in YAML::PP.

    Some of these changes might break code, but I expect this will be rare.

    As I see more and more CPAN modules using YAML::PP, I decided to make these changes as soon as possible.

    I will explain all changes and the reasons.

  • Introducing KBOS

    Starting even before Moose, we (in the Perl 5 world) have a plethora of Modules extending the syntax of the language with Perl 6 and more in mind. The following article sums up not only my 2 and a half cents on the subject but also an attempt to implement it. It should be of interest to anybody thinking about programming in general.

    As many here know, Kephra is the project closest to my heart and during the latest iteration, I decided to extend the language itself to get a more expressive, less repetitive code base. I want a fast, extendable type system with helpful error messages, real private attributes, real private methods, signatures with typed, positional, named and optional arguments, relaxed professional error handling, I want to know all instances of a class, reuse by delegation and incorporate any foreign objects. Last not least should the system support me in marshalling all attributes, so I can fully restore a program state after restart or switch into a remote session / other window.

    The Kephra Base Object System (KBOS - read: ok boss) is designed to deliver on all that and I just want to discuss here my decisions. Some seem to be strange, like no inheritance (a feature), class types (not even Raku has them) or 4 different method scopes. But hej its my pile of garbage, stay away. I want this to become the optimal object system for Kephra's needs. It is not clear to me if I will release it or parts as a separate distribution in future.

  • Postponing some feature removals in Python 3.9

    Python 2 was officially "retired" on the last day of 2019, so no bugs will be fixed or changes made in that version of the language, at least by the core developers—distributions and others will continue for some time to come. But there are lots of Python projects that still support Python 2.7 and may not be ready for an immediate clean break. Some changes that were made for the upcoming Python 3.9 release (which is currently scheduled for October) are causing headaches because support for long-deprecated 2.7-compatibility features is being dropped. That led to a discussion on the python-dev mailing list about postponing those changes to give a bit more time to projects that want to drop Python 2.7 support soon, but not immediately.

    There will actually be one final release of Python 2, Python 2.7.18, in April. It is something of a celebratory release that will be made in conjunction with PyCon. There were some fixes that accumulated in the branch between the 2.7.17 release in October and the end of the year, so those fixes will be flushed and the branch retired. Other than the release itself, no other changes will be allowed for that branch in 2020.

  • SUSE Hack Week Spotlight: Guerrilla AI Team

    SUSE Hack Week is a week-long sprint permitting developers time off from their day jobs to work on something entirely of their own design or wishes. This week we will be showcasing some of the amazing projects coming out of SUSE Hack Week and the brilliant minds behind them. Stay tuned all week long for more features.

More in Tux Machines

Torvalds Blasts "Beyond Stupid" Flushing L1d On Context Switches - Reverts Code For Now

As part of the initial set of changes merged today for Linux 5.8 was the x86/mm material that included the controversial feature of opt-in flushing of the L1 data cache on context switching. Linus Torvalds ended up deciding to revert this functionality as for now at least he views it as crazy. While this feature is opt-in via new prctl options and not enabled by default and done in the name of helping those concerned about snoop assisted data sampling vulnerabilities or cache leakage via side channels and yet to be uncovered CPU vulnerabilities, for the time being Linux creator Linus Torvalds is not convinced. Read more Original:

  • Re: [GIT PULL] x86/mm changes for v5.8
    >  - Provide an opt-in (prctl driven) mechanism to flush the L1D cache on context switch.
    >    The goal is to allow tasks that are paranoid due to the recent snoop assisted data
    >    sampling vulnerabilites, to flush their L1D on being switched out.
    
    Am I mis-reading this?
    
    Because it looks to me like this basically exports cache flushing
    instructions to user space, and gives processes a way to just say
    "slow down anybody else I schedule with too".
    
    I don't see a way for a system admin to say "this is stupid, don't do it".
    
    In other words, from what I can tell, this takes the crazy "Intel
    ships buggy CPU's and it causes problems for virtualization" code
    (which I didn't much care about), and turns it into "anybody can opt
    in to this disease, and now it affects even people and CPU's that
    don't need it and configurations where it's completely pointless".
    
    To make matters worse, it has that SW flushing fallback that isn't
    even architectural from what I remember of the last time it was
    discussed, but most certainly will waste a lot of time going through
    the motions that may or may not flush the L1D after all.
    
    I don't want some application to go "Oh, I'm _soo_ special and pretty
    and such a delicate flower, that I want to flush the L1D on every task
    switch, regardless of what CPU I am on, and regardless of whether
    there are errata or not".
    
    Because that app isn't just slowing down itself, it's slowing down others too.
    
    I have a hard time following whether this might all end up being
    predicated on the STIBP static branch conditionals and might thus at
    least be limited only to CPU's that have the problem in the first
    place.
    
    But I ended up unpulling it because I can't figure that out, and the
    explanations in the commits don't clarify (and do imply that it's
    regardless of any other errata, since it's for "undiscovered future
    errata").
    
    Because I don't want a random "I can make the kernel do stupid things"
    flag for people to opt into. I think it needs a double opt-in.
    
    At a _minimum_, SMT being enabled should disable this kind of crazy
    pseudo-security entirely, since it is completely pointless in that
    situation. Scheduling simply isn't a synchronization point with SMT
    on, so saying "sure, I'll flush the L1 at context switch" is beyond
    stupid.
    
    I do not want the kernel to do things that seem to be "beyond stupid".
    
    Because I really think this is just PR and pseudo-security, and I
    think there's a real cost in making people think "oh, I'm so special
    that I should enable this".
    
    I'm more than happy to be educated on why I'm wrong, but for now I'm
    unpulling it for lack of data.
    
    Maybe it never happens on SMT because of all those subtle static
    branch rules, but I'd really like to that to be explained.
    
                        Linus
    

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

  • Want A More Secure Computer At The Cost Of Performance? Linux 5.8 Landing L1d Flushing

    For those very concerned about CPU data sampling vulnerabilities, the Linux 5.8 kernel comes with the ability to flush the L1 data cache on each context switch. That's good for security, but will hurt the system performance with all the excess L1 cache flushing. This work stems from a proposal earlier this year to flush the L1d cache on context switches due to recent snoop assisted data sampling vulnerabilites or the cache data leaked via side channels. This work was carried out by an Amazon engineer so presumably there is some interest in offering this functionality in the AWS space.

  • AMD Radeon Linux Driver Sees Patches For New "Sienna Cichlid" GPU

    Still digging through the 207 patches for the AMD Radeon Sienna Cichlid, but will update if seeing anything else of note. For the most part it's leveraging the existing Navi code paths but the usual churn surrounding firmware, clock-gating / power management differences, and other modifications in the usual spots for bringing up new hardware. The main code additions primarily pertain to the new DCN3 and VCN3 blocks. Given the timing of these patches, the AMD Sienna Cichlid won't be mainlined until the Linux 5.9 merge window opening in August and then releasing in stable around October. That timeframe at least does point to Sienna Cichlid likely being the "RDNA 2" graphics card launch coming later in the calendar year.

  • 2020-06-01 | Linux Headlines

    The Linux kernel packs version 5.7 with exciting additions, version 2.2 of the Foliate eBook reader is out with support for many more formats, and members of the Association of American Publishers sue the Internet Archive over their library lending practices.

  • Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 20.04 LTS overview | Ubuntu, traditionally modern.

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu Cinnamon Remix 20.04 LTS and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • SUSE Update Infrastructure Access Through the Data Center

    In Step 2 Toward Enhanced Update Infrastructure Access the time-line for enabling access to the SUSE update infrastructure in the Public Cloud via routing through the data center was announced. As of June 1, 2020 we have started the work necessary to make this possible for all regions in AWS, Azure, and GCE. This marks the beginning of the final phase of a process that started almost 1 year ago with A New Update Infrastructure For The Public Cloud. We expect to have everything completed by no later than the end of June 2020, but will most likely be much faster. The changes from a global IP based access control mechanism to an instance based access mechanism apply to both SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server For SAP Applications (SLES For SAP) on-demand instances and any images released in the future that might access the update infrastructure.

  • Learn how to save money, reduce complexity with SUSE Manager [Ed: Linux has been around since the 1970s, it says. OK, whatever...]

    “The first is cost,” he says. “Linux has been around since the 1970s and has come a long way in that time. In one month (April 2020), Linux installations grew from 1,3% of the total installed base to a 3%. This might not sound like a lot, but it represents massive growth. For some Linux distributions, the grow rate was better than 600%.” [...] Brink points out that switching to a Linux front-end and an effective back-end management tool could save organisations a massive chunk of their end user license costs. SUSE Manager monitors an organisation’s infrastructure and manages how they deploy services on to front-end devices from a central point.

  • OSI Charting a Course for 2020 and Beyond [Ed: Why does the OSI take pride in becoming a home for a Microsoft front group like ClearlyDefined?]

    The key to understanding how we move forward is to first remember how we got here. OSI as we know it didn't exist until 2013. Founded in 1998, the organization was held together in its first decade through strong board leadership in Michael Tiemann (2001-2012) and Danese Cooper (2002-2011). Deb Bryant (2012-present), Karl Fogel (2011-2014), Mike Milinkovich (2012-2018), and Simon Phipps (2010-2020) helped OSI begin professionalizing, by hiring General Manager Patrick Masson (2013-present), and becoming more democratic, with the introduction of a community-elected board. Molly de Blanc (2016-2020), Allison Randal (2014-2019), and Stefano “Zack” Zacchiroli (2014-2017) fostered better ties with the free software community. Richard Fontana (2013-2019) elevated legal discussions, taking OSI’s licensing work from knowledgeable hackers to expert practitioners and defining a review process. And Pam Chestek (2019-present) has brought a new level of professionalism to the license review process. This is a reductionist and inevitably incomplete view of OSI’s history, but the point is this: OSI has come a long way, and I am forever grateful to the talented and generous individuals who collectively invested decades to get us here. Over the last seven years, OSI has: sustained its core mission, shaped policy around the globe, worked tirelessly to mitigate open washing, built an alliance of more than 125 organizations representing hundreds of thousands of people, provided a home for projects like ClearlyDefined, and rolled out programs like FLOSS Desktops for Kids and Open Source Technology Management courses with Brandeis University.

  • Priyanka Sharma Joins CNCF as General Manager

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • Fedora Community Blog monthly summary: May 2020

    This is the first in what I hope to make a monthly series summarizing the past month on the Community Blog. [...] In May, we published 31 posts. The site had 4,964 visits from 2,392 unique viewers. Readers wrote 13 comments. 202 visits came from Fedora Planet, while 716 came from search engines.

  • Red Hat Success Stories: A foundation for network automation and betting on OpenShift

    You hear the expression "betting" on platforms all the time. But Bilyoner Interactive Services in Turkey is really betting on Red Hat OpenShift by deploying a live betting platform on OpenShift with Red Hat Ansible Automation. When live sports betting was legalized in Turkey, Bilyoner Interactive Services needed a supported, scalable, and highly available technology foundation to support this new service. By migrating from community open source to Red Hat OpenShift and Red Hat Ansible Automation Platform, Bilyoner used container and microservices technology to quickly create and launch its new live betting platform. As a result, the company reports a five-fold increase in traffic and close to 100% service uptime.

  • Kafka Monthly Digest – May 2020

    In this 28th edition of the Kafka Monthly Digest, I’ll cover what happened in the Apache Kafka community in May 2020.

  • Free cloud native security conference hosted by IBM Developer

    Security concerns remain one of the key factors in enterprises unlocking the true value of the cloud. From modernizing applications with containerized microservices, to securing data while training AI models, or building continuous, secure DevOps pipelines in a growing complex hybrid cloud, developers face myriad challenges when it comes to security in a cloud native hybrid cloud environment. IBM Developer wants security to be one less thing you have to worry about when you’re building high-performance solutions. That’s why we put together the Digital Developer Conference: Cloud Native Security on June 24, 25, and July 1. [...] Learn the skills to react with speed and confidence by using solutions on IBM Cloud and Red Hat OpenShift alongside leading open source contributions by IBM and Red Hat to Kubernetes, Istio, Open Container Initiative, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and Apache Foundation.

  • Enable Sysadmin celebrates one-year anniversary with Sudoers Program

    What started as an idea in early 2019 has now blossomed into a publishing platform with a growing community with more than 100 writers. As we celebrate the one-year anniversary of the Enable Sysadmin publication, we’re excited to announce a new program for our community of writers. On May 5, 2020, we officially launched the Sudoers program for the Enable Sysadmin community. The Sudoers program recognizes our most trusted and committed contributors and provides a framework for becoming an established writer on the site. The editorial team has been working closely with 10 of our writers to help establish the first group of members in the Sudoer program. To date, this group of amazing sysadmins has collectively published more than 100 articles on the Enable Sysadmin publication.

  • Enable Sysadmin: A year by the numbers