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KDE: This Week in KDE, KDE Plasma 5.18 and Videos From KDE Talks at FOSDEM

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  • This week in KDE: Plasma bug-fixing and Samba bug-squashing

    Plasma 5.18 has been released! A ton of work went into this release and we’re very proud of it. However I’d like to apologize for it being a bit buggier than we’d have preferred. We’ve gone balls-to-the-wall off the chain bananas fixing the issues you folks are reporting! Almost all of the highest-profile issues are fixed already, to be released with Plasma 5.18.1 in a few days! And we’ve got the less major regressions in our sights too! But still, we know that stability hasn’t always been our strong suit and we’re aiming for a higher standard next time, discussing how we can get there. So thank you for your patience and understanding, and enjoy Plasma 5.18!

  • KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS Offers Better Integration With GTK/GNOME Applications

    The KDE community has come out with the new release of the open-source KDE Plasma Desktop environment, which is also the LTS (Long Term Support) version designed to run on GNU/Linux distributions.

    Offering a host of new features, Plasma 5.18 succeeds the aging Plasma 5.12 LTS.

    With the latest version, users can look forward to much better integration with GTK/GNOME applications. It also includes a varied change-log with tweaks affecting almost every part of the desktop experience.

    The developers behind Plasma 5.18 said that this new version of their favorite desktop environment is “easier and more fun” and also allows you to do more tasks faster.

  • Videos From KDE Talks at FOSDEM

    How QML, a language prominently used for designing UI, could be used to create title video clips containing text and/or images. The videos can then be rendered and composited over other videos in the video-editing process. Kdenlive's Google Summer of Code 2019 project tried to achieve this and is still under active development.

    QML is used primarily for UI development in Qt Applications. It provides an easy way of designing and creating interactive, clean and a modern UI. Kdenlive is a popular non-linear open-source video editor and it currently makes use of XML to describe title clips -- clips which contain text or images used to composite over videos. XML requires more processing in the backend as one needs to explicitly write code for, say an animation of the text. Using QML eases this restriction, making the backend more robust and maintainable as rendering in QML makes use of a dedicated Qt Scene Graph. Kdenlive's Google Summer of Code 2019 student Akhil Gangadharan Kurungadathil tried to achieve this by creating a new rendering backend library and a new MLT QML producer which is still under active development. Owing to the dedicated scene graph while rendering, this could also possibly lead to greater overall performance.

KDE Sees Improvements For Samba Shares, Fixing Mouse Input...

  • KDE Sees Improvements For Samba Shares, Fixing Mouse Input For GTK Apps On XWayland

    While this week marked the release of KDE Plasma 5.18 LTS, KDE developers haven't let up on their bug fixing activities and other improvements to this open-source desktop environment.

    Some of the highlights for other work this week besides pushing Plasma 5.18.0 out the door includes:

    - Support for creating and pasting files on Samba shares within Dolphin. There is also support for URLs beginning with cifs:// for paths to Samba shares and other KDE Dolphin improvements around Samba mounts, including support for showing the amount of free space on such shares.

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today's howtos