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Programming: Thoughts From Jussi Pakkanen, Releases From Debian Developers, GSoC Projects and Python Leftovers

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  • Jussi Pakkanen: Open source does not have a reward mechanism for tedious

    Many software developers are creators and builders. They are drawn to problems of the first type. The fact that they are difficult is not a downside, it is a challenge to be overcome. It can even be a badge of merit which you can wave around your fellow developers. These projects include things like writing your own operating system or 3D game engine, writing device drivers that saturate the fastest of transfer links, lock free atomic parallelism, distributed file systems that store exabytes of data as well as embedded firmware that has less than 1 kilobyte of RAM. Working on these kinds of problems is rewarding on its own, even if the actual product never finishes or fails horribly when eventually launched. They are, in a single word, sexy.

    Most problems are not like that, but are instead the programming equivalent of ditch digging. They consist of a lot of hard work, which is not very exciting on its own but it still needs to be done. It is difficult to get volunteers to work on these kinds of problems and this is where the problem gets amplified in open source. Corporations have a very strong way to motivate people to work on tedious problems and it is called a paycheck. Volunteer driven open source development does not have a way to incentivise people in the same way. This is a shame, because the chances of success for any given software project (and startup) is directly proportional to the amount of tedious work people working on it are willing to do.

  • ledger2beancount 2.0 released

    I released version 2.0 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

  • digest 0.6.25: Spookyhash bugfix

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, and spookyhash algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects. It is a fairly widely-used package (currently listed at 889k monthly downloads with 255 direct reverse dependencies and 7340 indirect reverse dependencies) as many tasks may involve caching of objects for which it provides convenient general-purpose hash key generation.

    This release is a one issue fix. Aaron Lun noticed some issues when spookyhash is used in streaming mode. Kendon Bell, who also contributed spookyhash quickly found the issue which is a simple oversight. This was worth addressing in new release, so I pushed 0.6.25.

  • Google announces 200 open-source mentors for the 2020 GSoC event

    With this year's Google Summer of Code event right around the corner, the organizers considered this to be the perfect time to announce the mentoring organizations for the participants. In this year's edition of GSoC, there will be 200 mentoring organizations, including 30 new teams. Read on to find out more details of this open-source event.

  • Python 101 2nd Edition Sample Chapters

    I have put together some sample chapters for the 2nd edition of Python 101 which is coming out later this year. You can download the PDF version of these sample chapters here. Note that these chapters may have minor typos in them. Feel free to let me know if you find any bugs or errors.

  • Python 3.7.6 : The SELinux python package.

    The tutorial for today is about the SELinux python package.

  • Release 0.7.0 of GooCalendar
  • Python in Production

    I’m missing a key part from the public Python discourse and I would like to help to change that.

    The other day I was listening to a podcast about running Python services in production. While I disagreed with some of the choices they made, it acutely reminded me about what I’ve been missing in the past years from the public Python discourse.

  • Python Packaging Metadata

    Since this topic keeps coming up, I’d like to briefly share my thoughts on Python package metadata because it’s – as always – more complex than it seems.

    When I say metadata I mean mostly the version so I will talk about it interchangeably. But the description, the license, or the project URL are also part of the game.

  • Better Python tracebacks with Rich

    One of my goals in writing Rich was to render really nice Python tracebacks. And now that feature has landed.

    I've never found Python tracebacks to be a great debugging aid beyond telling me what the exception was, and where it occurred. In a recent update to Rich, I've tried to refresh the humble traceback to give enough context to diagnose errors before switching back to the editor.

Google Summer of Code 2020 Mentoring Organizations Announced

  • Google Summer of Code 2020 Mentoring Organizations Announced

    You can find the full list of organizations/projects on GSoC website. For each company, you can click on “View Idea List” to see more details about the potential projects. Students will be invited to apply and submit proposals between March 16-31. Selected students will be working on the project between May 19, 2020 – August 11, 2020, with regular evaluation and final results on August 26, 2020.

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More in Tux Machines

Python Programming

  • PyCharm IDE 2020.1 Released with Interactive Rebasing

    PyCharm IDE 2020.1 was released a day ago as the first major release in 2020. The new version features interactive rebasing, smarter debugging, and JetBrains Mono font.

  • Flask Delicious Tutorial : Building a Library Management System Part 3 - Routes

    I have configured what we need in this repo: DeliciousFlask-3.1. Download it, and run app.py (If you are new to python see Part2). In this part we explore some concepts related to routes.

  • Talk Python to Me: #259 From Academia to Tech Industry and Python

    Did you come to Python from the academic side of the world? Maybe got into working with code for research or lab work and found you liked coding more than your first field of study. Whatever the reason, many people make the transition from the academic world over to tech and industry. On this episode, you'll meet three women who have made this transition, and you'll hear their stories. I'm excited to speak with Jennifer Stark, Kaylea Haynes, and Eslene Bikoumou about their journey to the tech field.

  • Test and Code: 108: PySpark - Jonathan Rioux

    Apache Spark is a unified analytics engine for large-scale data processing. PySpark blends the powerful Spark big data processing engine with the Python programming language to provide a data analysis platform that can scale up for nearly any task. Johnathan Rioux, author of "PySpark in Action", joins the show and gives us a great introduction of Spark and PySpark to help us decide how to get started and decide whether or not to decide if Spark and PySpark are right you.

  • Temporary Contact Number based Contact Tracing

    I have already talked here before about privacy preserving contact tracing to fight Covid-19 but I figured I give an update to this. I have spent the last week now investigating different approaches to this and my view has changed quite a bit. I strongly believe that contact tracing through phone apps is one of our best chances to return to normal and without losing our civil liberties. If you want to understand why, have a look at previous post about this topic. [...] If your local government is planning on implementing a covid tracing app it might be worth directing them towards Co-Epi. It already has an implementation of many of the same ideas in their GitHub repository. If they do want a centralized approach the Singaporean government Open Sourced their application under GPL3 under the name BlueTrace. It avoids largely unnecessary cloud infrastructure from what I can tell.

today's howtos

Jupiter Broadcasting (Bought by Linux Academy, Now Cloud Guru) Publishes Last Shows

  • Hiatus | Choose Linux 33

    Choose Linux enters indefinite hiatus.

  • Goodbye from Linux Action News

    In what turns out to be our final publication, we say goodbye.

  • 2020-04-09 | Linux Headlines

    The Fintech Open Source Foundation is joining The Linux Foundation, Samsung releases user-space exFAT tools for Linux, Docker Compose is getting a formal specification with the help of a new open source community, and the latest Windows 10 Insider Preview includes File Explorer integration in the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

  • Compromised Networking | Self-Hosted 16

    We share some WiFi tips and essential network ideas. And discuss one of our most significant compromises in the show so far.

Android Leftovers